Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [agile-usability] Design Values

Expand Messages
  • Todd Zaki Warfel
    ... This clearly shows you have a misconception of what user experience research is. Unfortunately, there s a lot of bad research going on in the UX field by
    Message 1 of 37 , Jul 12, 2009
    • 0 Attachment

      On Jul 12, 2009, at 7:37 AM, Larry Constantine wrote:

      I would never presume to suggest that user experience research is bad (although it is over-rated and even over-used, but I would never say that because anyone who does is clearly deranged or evil or both)[...]

      This clearly shows you have a misconception of what user experience research is. Unfortunately, there's a lot of bad research going on in the UX field by people who are misinformed and untrained. The fact of the matter is quite the opposite of what you propose—user experience, which I prefer to refer to as design research, is not only not over-rated, but in fact typically under-used. 

      I am curious why you think it is over-used (not to be an instigator, but really am curious). In my experience working w/user experience practitioners, business people, and software developers I frequently hear "we don't have time for user research." This is bullocks. There's always time. You just have to know what method to use given your constraints. 

      In the example of Don Norman, yes, some people like Don Norman, Jonathan Ives, Jared Spool and others have been doing this so long that their expert input is quite valid and can serve as A data point. But I'm sure if you speak to Jared (I use him as I know him personally) he'll tell you that he's continually learning things as times are changing. And frankly, if Don Norman and Jonathan Ives don't think they're continually learning, then I wouldn't trust their "expert opinion." SMEs are only one data point. Relying solely on them is dangerous and rarely produces innovation. 

      BTW, Apple's innovation comes from design exploration and not listening to "the experts." So, I would consider Ives an expert who doesn't listen to "expert opinion." 

      Finally, you state that "I have worked in spaces in which the organization, political, practical, and fiscal constraints have made field research essentially impossible and validated data has been unavailable. This has not prevented us from going forward and designing good products, even outstanding successes."

      First, how do you determine good products and success? If you don't have some type of base research to determine what it is suppose to be (based on user need, not some bogus marketing requirements document), what do you measure against to determine you've met your goal? Further, if it was outstandingly successful, imagine how astronomically successful it would have been if it had been informed by some good design research. 


      Cheers!

      Todd Zaki Warfel
      Principal Design Researcher
      Messagefirst | Designing Information. Beautifully.
      ----------------------------------
      Contact Info
      Voice: (215) 825-7423
      Email: todd@...
      Twitter: zakiwarfel
      ----------------------------------
      In theory, theory and practice are the same.
      In practice, they are not.




    • Jeremy Kriegel
      One of Jeff s points resonated strongly with me. To put it flippantly, no one cares how we build products, just how much they get from using them. Ideally, the
      Message 37 of 37 , Jul 27, 2009
      • 0 Attachment
        One of Jeff's points resonated strongly with me. To put it flippantly, no one cares how we build products, just how much they get from using them. Ideally, the way we work makes us happy, makes our customers happy, and makes our bosses happy. (note: money is often a significant component of said happiness)

        Adherence to the process can be almost comical. At a prior company, when talking to someone about why they missed their release deadline (yeah, I know. Agile and deadlines are not the best of friends) he explained that a certain activity had to be done 2 sprints prior to release, but that its associated story got cut from the sprint it needed to happen in. Clearly, there is a lot at work here that I'm not going to bother to dissect, but this team was more focused on the agile process than the success of the product and the perceptions of the company leadership. It was not pretty. 

        -jer

        "Be well, do good work & keep in touch."
            - Garrison Keillor


        On Sun, Jul 26, 2009 at 11:00 PM, Ron Jeffries <ronjeffries@...> wrote:
         

        Hello, John. On Sunday, July 26, 2009, at 10:53:07 PM, you wrote:

        > Heh. It would never occur to me to recommend something that I wasn't
        > doing myself.

        I often recommend exercise and eating sensibly ... War remains the decisive human failure.
        -- John Kenneth Galbraith


      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.