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Re: [agile-usability] Scrum and UCD

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  • sigbackup
    Hi Linda,unfortunately I don t have an answer for you right now. I m still trying to figure out the best way to include UCD within the Agile methodology I use
    Message 1 of 9 , Mar 5 12:52 PM
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      Hi Linda,
      unfortunately I don't have an answer for you right now. I'm still trying to figure out the best way to include UCD within the Agile methodology I use to optimize processes (from my point of view software is not the goal but the mean).
      However I would like to suggest you some interesting websites and articles:

      http://www.uie.com/events/uiconf/2008/seminars/patton/  (on the right column you can find a good article and the inteview with Jeff Patton about this topic)



      Hope this helps.

      PS Let us know how your thesis is going on ...



      Sig






      2009/3/4 linda.hellman <linda.hellman@...>

      Hi,
      I'm writing my Master's Thesis at the moment and in my Thesis I'm trying to find the biggest problems between the two methods and then to integrate Scrum and UCD and create new user-centered Scrum.
      My Thesis is based on literature about integrating user-centered design and agile methods. My Thesis is almost ready and at the moment I am starting to introduce my process to one software project where I am the UE designer.

      I would like hear from You, what kind of actual troubles and problems You have had when using both Scrum and User-Centered Design?
      And what advantages has the use of both methods brought to the project?

      Waiting for your opinions,
      Linda.


    • William Pietri
      ... Hi, Linda. This may be a slightly more philosophical answer than you want, but I think one important set of issues can be summed up by Voltaire s maxim,
      Message 2 of 9 , Mar 7 10:20 AM
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        linda.hellman wrote:
        > I would like hear from You, what kind of actual troubles and problems You have had when using both Scrum and User-Centered Design?
        > And what advantages has the use of both methods brought to the project?
        >

        Hi, Linda. This may be a slightly more philosophical answer than you
        want, but I think one important set of issues can be summed up by
        Voltaire's maxim, "The perfect is the enemy of the good."

        In my youth, I was very excited by the design of the internals of a
        system, what is sometimes called a system's architecture. (Although
        that's definitely distinct from the sort of design you're thinking of,
        bear with me a bit.) Every time some problem came up in a live system,
        the answer to me was obvious. I should have spend more time researching,
        put more effort into analyzing, drawn just a few more beautiful diagrams.

        For every new system, I'd redouble my efforts. But that never worked,
        not like I wanted it to. Every time I'd put my theories into practice,
        I'd learn something. Every time we'd try to build something, the world
        would change on us. Every time we released something perfect, the world
        would show us what we'd missed. I resented that terribly.

        Agile methods, though, gave me the ability to make that a source of
        strength, not a source of weakness. Now I start rough, and let the world
        tell me what it needs. That doesn't mean that I don't put plenty of time
        and effort into research and planning, as planning is a great way to
        think things through. But it does mean I rarely have to bet heavily on
        the perfection of my plans. Instead of a thousand bets being resolved on
        one roll of the dice, I get to make my bets a few at a time, following
        up on the wins and learning from the losses.

        In the end, I get better results with less effort and less stress. I'd
        never go back. A lot of software architects feel the same way.


        This relates to your question because I think the world of user-facing
        design is going through a similar transition that the software
        architecture world has spent the last decade or so going through.
        Designers face a lot of the same issues that software architects did,
        with one added burden: they had to depend on those architects, giving
        them even less control over both the process and the outcome.

        It's my firm belief that things will turn out similarly. People will
        create new approaches, new ways of working, and new techniques that make
        short cycles and tight feedback loops a source of great power for
        continuous improvement. In fact, they are creating and using them right
        now. I've visited quite a number of agile shops over the last few years,
        and although I've seen my share of disgruntled designers, I've seen many
        more who say they are very happy, and even a few who say weekly releases
        are great, but they'd love it to be faster.

        William
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