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Re: [agile-usability] Re: Inline Editing vs. Separate Page

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  • James Page
    ... You can use a bit of javascript and regular expressions to do it in the browser. Give the user feedback as they enter the data. Look at some of the
    Message 1 of 27 , Jan 7, 2009
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      There must be some kind of web2.0-y way of providing ongoing feedback as
      to whether the cell contents are valid. Has anyone seen any examples of
      this type of inline cell validation anywhere?

      You can use a bit of javascript and regular expressions to do it in the browser. Give the user feedback as they enter the data. Look at some of the password strength form items in some sign up forms.

      Validation of dates can be done via a pop up calender.

      James
       

      2009/1/7 fitzgeraldsteele <fitzgeraldsteele@...>

      I thought Faith gave excellent advice...empathy is a key tool in user
      experience evaluation.

      So it appears the group is, in general, in favor of inline editing where
      possible. I'm thinking about Excel's cell validation functionality,
      which doesn't have the best experience in my mind. You can define rules
      for a cell, but the rules only get validated when you're done editing
      the cell. And, you get an ugly modal error message.

      There must be some kind of web2.0-y way of providing ongoing feedback as
      to whether the cell contents are valid. Has anyone seen any examples of
      this type of inline cell validation anywhere?

      Someone mentioned Flickr...but that's mostly unvalidated text data.

      The closest thing I can think of is http://www.mint.com, an online
      personal finance site. It gives a standard table view of your
      transactions. When you click on a row, the fields turn editable.
      Additional information that might otherwise appear on a separate edit
      page is instead provided in context in a layer that appears under the
      cell. That might be a model you could use.

      Any others?

      Also, check out the jQuery Validation Plugin.
      http://bassistance.de/jquery-plugins/jquery-plugin-validation/

      This has been an interesting discussion...thanks everyone!

      --- In agile-usability@yahoogroups.com, William Pietri <william@...>
      wrote:


      >
      > Jon Kern wrote:
      > > I have found that users really enjoy inline editing on their
      webpages.
      > > Or at least a simple transition between going from the "view" of the
      > > page to being able to "edit" the page. While sometimes entry of the
      data
      > > (e.g., an image requires browse/upload) is different than the
      display
      > > (just the image or a thumbnail), users seem to prefer "in-line
      editing"
      > > over going to some other admin-like page to control content.
      > >
      > > I think the basic reason is -- like in document authoring -- when
      you
      > > see a page that needs editing, it makes sense to edit it right where
      you
      > > are versus going off to some other unrelated place.
      >
      >
      > When you describe it that way, that makes a lot of sense.
      >
      > I think Flickr was the first site I saw to get that really right for
      me.
      > If you want to edit a photo title or description, you just click on
      it,
      > and it does some AJAX magic to make the field editable. (As long as
      you
      > have access, that is.) There's no need to figure out which affordance
      to
      > click on, what the right menu choice is, or what tab to go to. It was
      > such a superior interaction that my opinion on JavaScript changed 180
      > degrees in an instant.
      >
      > And from the development perspective, that can sometimes be easier
      than
      > a separate interface, especially one where you can edit a bunch of
      > things before submitting. If the user's only editing one element at a
      > time as they work inline, then although you have to handle a bunch of
      > different editing operations, they're all clear and sequential, rather
      > than complex and interdependent.
      >
      > If I were you, Dave, I'd try sketching a few different possibilities,
      > perhaps as part of a joint design session with the users. And yes, I'd
      > agree that a spike beforehand might be helpful. Then you can go off
      and
      > estimate each set of options. If nothing else, this will let you have
      > new and interesting disagreements, rather than one you perhaps have
      had
      > your fill of.
      >
      > William
      >


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