Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Today's article on UseIt.com

Expand Messages
  • Bonnie
    ... In this section, Nielsen frames the problem of long-term coherence of a large piece (or even a suite) of software that Agile techniques don t deal with
    Message 1 of 76 , Nov 20, 2008
    • 0 Attachment
      >"Another issue is that, with Agile, a product's development is broken
      >down into smaller parts that are completed one at a time. Such an
      >approach risks undermining the concept of an integrated total user
      >experience, where the different features work consistently and help
      >users build a coherent conceptual model of the system."


      In this section, Nielsen frames the problem of long-term coherence of
      a large piece (or even a suite) of software that Agile techniques
      don't deal with directly. I agree with others who have posted that
      iterations allow for increased interactions with UX designers and can
      actually result in the better UX execution of the feature at hand, but
      this says nothing of the risks of long-term serial production of
      features.

      Nielsen's suggestion that companies store "basic knowledge about user
      work flows, personas, and usability guidelines outside individual
      projects so it can be reused for years across many projects" seems
      sensible, but also requires maintenance, so how do you fit it into the
      Agile process? Long-term architectural and UX consistency are concerns
      that have been raised by CTOs and technical advisors I've worked with
      - how do you embrace change while ensuring you're not producing an
      inconsistent patchwork of features?
    • Desilets, Alain
      ... that ... one ... http://forums.construx.com/blogs/stevemcc/archive/2008/03/27/productivit y- ...
      Message 76 of 76 , Jan 9, 2009
      • 0 Attachment
        > > There are other studies (I don't have the exact quote) that show
        that
        > > the difference between a top-notch developer and a run-of-the-mill
        one
        > > is a factor of 10 or so.
        >
        > The back up for that is here :-
        >
        http://forums.construx.com/blogs/stevemcc/archive/2008/03/27/productivit
        y-
        >
        variations-among-software-developers-and-teams-the-origin-of-quot-10x-qu
        ot.aspx

        Thx James. I always assumed that this was indeed supported by actual
        studies, but still had a small nagging doubt that it might be one of
        those urban legends that start with "studies show that ...." ;-). This
        is a good reference which eliminates that doubt.

        Alain
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.