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Re: [agile-usability] cooper on agile

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  • Steve Freeman
    ... His last section essentially described the phases of RUP. That s not necessarily bad in itself but it suggests either he didn t want to say it out loud
    Message 1 of 69 , Aug 23, 2008
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      On 12 Aug 2008, at 17:33, Robert Biddle wrote:
      >
      > One point that puzzled me was the suggestion, I think, that iterative
      > and incremental programming was necessary to deal with the
      > technical challenges in writing the code. He seemed to suggest that
      > the "business" aspects could be worked out in advance. I realize he
      > advocates research and design before programming, but this seemed a
      > heavier line than I expected.
      >
      > (He generally merged the "business" and UI aspects, but I'll leave
      > that issue for another time.)
      >
      > Then, as I understood it, he suggested that the software be written
      > twice, once iteratively, incrementally, and in collaboration with the
      > UI people and customer. And the again in a production step, which did
      > not need to be iterative, incremental, or collaborative. I did not
      > understand why.


      His last section essentially described the phases of RUP. That's not
      necessarily bad in itself but it suggests either he didn't want to say
      it out loud because he thought it would upset us, or that he didn't
      know.

      His contention that, having done it once, us coders could sit in quiet
      rooms and type it in (because by then we'd know everything we needed
      to about the design) was not popular on my table.

      I prefer Don Norman's line. I saw him talk years ago just after he
      joined Apple. "Gee", he said (more or less), "until I joined a product
      company, I'd no idea writing software was so hard."

      S.


      Steve Freeman
      http://www.mockobjects.com

      Winner of the Agile Alliance Gordon Pask award 2006
    • Steve Freeman
      ... His last section essentially described the phases of RUP. That s not necessarily bad in itself but it suggests either he didn t want to say it out loud
      Message 69 of 69 , Aug 23, 2008
      • 0 Attachment
        On 12 Aug 2008, at 17:33, Robert Biddle wrote:
        >
        > One point that puzzled me was the suggestion, I think, that iterative
        > and incremental programming was necessary to deal with the
        > technical challenges in writing the code. He seemed to suggest that
        > the "business" aspects could be worked out in advance. I realize he
        > advocates research and design before programming, but this seemed a
        > heavier line than I expected.
        >
        > (He generally merged the "business" and UI aspects, but I'll leave
        > that issue for another time.)
        >
        > Then, as I understood it, he suggested that the software be written
        > twice, once iteratively, incrementally, and in collaboration with the
        > UI people and customer. And the again in a production step, which did
        > not need to be iterative, incremental, or collaborative. I did not
        > understand why.


        His last section essentially described the phases of RUP. That's not
        necessarily bad in itself but it suggests either he didn't want to say
        it out loud because he thought it would upset us, or that he didn't
        know.

        His contention that, having done it once, us coders could sit in quiet
        rooms and type it in (because by then we'd know everything we needed
        to about the design) was not popular on my table.

        I prefer Don Norman's line. I saw him talk years ago just after he
        joined Apple. "Gee", he said (more or less), "until I joined a product
        company, I'd no idea writing software was so hard."

        S.


        Steve Freeman
        http://www.mockobjects.com

        Winner of the Agile Alliance Gordon Pask award 2006
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