Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

What techniques do you use for end-user input?

Expand Messages
  • Nick Gassman
    It seems to me that much of the discussion on UX/UCD in Agile centers around techniques that are used within the team, or within the meeting room - with much
    Message 1 of 3 , Jun 25, 2008
    • 0 Attachment
      It seems to me that much of the discussion on UX/UCD in Agile centers
      around techniques that are used within the team, or within the meeting
      room - with much of the emphasis on paper prototyping when interacting
      with end users. This is clearly all of interest, but I'd also like to
      hear what other techniques use.

      In our case, our end users are the public, who are not part of our
      organisation. ba.com is a b2c ecommerce site. Typically we'll conduct
      interview-based usability sessions with real customers (end users) in
      a studio. We've also used or considered other technques, including

      - eye tracking
      - closed forums
      - use of public forums
      - remote testing
      - websites that facilitate feedback through registered users
      - internal testing on staff
      - posting design mockups or prototypes and asking for feedback
      - interviews in the departure lounge
      - etc

      There's also a whole glut of surverys, personas, segmentations, site
      metrics etc available to us to provide further information on who our
      customers are, what they want, what they actually do on our site, and
      what they do on other sites and offline.

      Now here's the question.

      Which techniques do you use in Agile developments? Are there some
      techniques that work better for waterfall v Agile or vice-versa? Would
      it depend on the type/size/importance of the project, or the stage the
      project is at?

      thanks

      * Nick Gassman - Usability and Standards Manager - http://ba.com *
    • James Page
      What has worked well for me before working out the test methods is creating well defined Key Performance Indicators (KPI s) or critical parameters , there has
      Message 2 of 3 , Jun 25, 2008
      • 0 Attachment
        What has worked well for me before working out the test methods is creating well defined Key Performance Indicators (KPI's) or "critical parameters", there has been some research in the HCI community going all the way back to Card, and Moran at Zerox on this. The HCI community calls KPI's "critical parameters". Well worth a read is William Newman's 1997 paper on them. See: http://www.xrce.xerox.com/Publications/Attachments/1997-103/EPC-1997-103.pdf

        Once the KPI's have been decided then one can work out the best way of tracking them. Very agile methods include the RITE method from Microsoft, and the various forms of remote testing, both synchronous and asynchronous. I have also used a consumer panel where the consumer was interview afterwards. This was quite effective. But the method chosen depends on the KPI's.

        What I have seen as critical is to increase the understanding of the whole team. Hence the need for KPI's, and CP's....

        The challenge one has with travel sites is that people will make several visits before making the purchase, this is especially true of non-business traveller. The users goals will be different on each visit. Testing this realistically is hard. I think somebody at BA once said that the web was a very good buying system, but not so good as a selling system.

        I would also try to incorporate some of the testing and research done by your marketing teams. I have found in the past there in much knowledge that can be found in testing consumers from the marketers, especially the direct marketers. (these people live or die on the response rates on their promotions). Also the direct marketers have allot of experience in being fast, and responsive.

        All the best

        James


        On Wed, Jun 25, 2008 at 8:29 PM, Nick Gassman <nick@...> wrote:

        It seems to me that much of the discussion on UX/UCD in Agile centers
        around techniques that are used within the team, or within the meeting
        room - with much of the emphasis on paper prototyping when interacting
        with end users. This is clearly all of interest, but I'd also like to
        hear what other techniques use.

        In our case, our end users are the public, who are not part of our
        organisation. ba.com is a b2c ecommerce site. Typically we'll conduct
        interview-based usability sessions with real customers (end users) in
        a studio. We've also used or considered other technques, including

        - eye tracking
        - closed forums
        - use of public forums
        - remote testing
        - websites that facilitate feedback through registered users
        - internal testing on staff
        - posting design mockups or prototypes and asking for feedback
        - interviews in the departure lounge
        - etc

        There's also a whole glut of surverys, personas, segmentations, site
        metrics etc available to us to provide further information on who our
        customers are, what they want, what they actually do on our site, and
        what they do on other sites and offline.

        Now here's the question.

        Which techniques do you use in Agile developments? Are there some
        techniques that work better for waterfall v Agile or vice-versa? Would
        it depend on the type/size/importance of the project, or the stage the
        project is at?

        thanks

        * Nick Gassman - Usability and Standards Manager - http://ba.com *


      • Nick Gassman
        ... You can set some top-level parameters like can buy a ticket of type x , gets all the information they need etc, but by the nature of a new development
        Message 3 of 3 , Jun 25, 2008
        • 0 Attachment
          On Wed, 25 Jun 2008 21:21:05 +0100, James Page wrote:

          >What has worked well for me before working out the test methods is creating well defined Key Performance Indicators (KPI's) or "critical parameters", there has been some research in the HCI community going all the way back to Card, and Moran at Zerox on this.
          >The HCI community calls KPI's "critical parameters". Well worth a read is William Newman's 1997 paper on them. See: http://www.xrce.xerox.com/Publications/Attachments/1997-103/EPC-1997-103.pdf
          >
          You can set some top-level parameters like 'can buy a ticket of type
          x', 'gets all the information they need' etc, but by the nature of a
          new development before you test it, you don't always know what some of
          the critical features will be.
          >
          >Once the KPI's have been decided then one can work out the best way of tracking them. Very agile methods include the RITE method from Microsoft, and the various forms of remote testing, both synchronous and asynchronous.
          >I have also used a consumer panel where the consumer was interview afterwards. This was quite effective. But the method chosen depends on the KPI's.
          >
          Agreed. There are some types of questions that you need quantitative
          data for, and others that you can usability test with 10 people. And
          that's the question I'm asking of people who have done Agile - what
          are the measures you're after, and what methods have you used?
          >
          >The challenge one has with travel sites is that people will make several visits before making the purchase, this is especially true of non-business traveller.
          >The users goals will be different on each visit.
          >
          Yes, we understand this. We know quite a bit about how people behave
          and use the site, and what they say they want.
          >
          >I would also try to incorporate some of the testing and research done by your marketing teams. I have found in the past there in much knowledge that can
          >be found in testing consumers from the marketers, especially the direct marketers. (these people live or die on the response rates on their promotions). Also the direct marketers have allot of experience in being fast, and responsive.

          The way it works for us, we do the testing of the site and new
          developments, and support marketing with this knowledge. They
          independently track the metrics that relate to campaigns.

          * Nick Gassman - Usability and Standards Manager - http://ba.com *
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.