Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [agile-usability] Distributing Persona Work to Developers

Expand Messages
  • William Pietri
    ... One team I coached dealt with this by having a number of portable or mobile whiteboards. Wherever the team went, so did the team environment. William
    Message 1 of 5 , Jun 4, 2008
    • 0 Attachment
      Leina wrote:
      > In the age of hot-desking where developers have no place to position
      > anything such as a posters [...]

      One team I coached dealt with this by having a number of portable or
      mobile whiteboards. Wherever the team went, so did the team environment.

      William
    • Baker, Lisa
      Our persona posters are in conference rooms, the lunch room cupboards, on the way to the bathroom, the executive conference room, the cube walls that create
      Message 2 of 5 , Jun 6, 2008
      • 0 Attachment
        Our persona posters are in conference rooms, the lunch room cupboards,
        on the way to the bathroom, the executive conference room, the cube
        walls that create the bull pen, the hallway walls... they're in
        marketing...

        We're a retail company so we have a 'family' of personas. When out on
        trips I typically email back a quick briefing of the trip and try to tie
        in a persona name of the type of person (or people) we talked to... then
        we use the persona name in use cases, etc.

        The personas are actually more popular in marketing and exec staff, I
        think. Each time we get a new design firm I think we reintroduce them.

        I have a presentation introducing all of them... I give it regularly to
        groups of new developers or visitors from our other geos. (I think I'm
        doing it again next week...)

        What about baseball-card sized persona's? 'Collect and trade them all.'


        Lisa Baker

        Human Factors Lead
        LANDesk, an Avocent(r) Company
        Lisa.baker@...
        801.208.1315


        "Simplifying our customers' work"


        ________________________________________________________________________
        ________________________________________________________________________
        2a. Re: Distributing Persona Work to Developers
        Posted by: "Jeff White" jwhite31@... jawsadieemail
        Date: Wed Jun 4, 2008 9:09 am ((PDT))

        Most of the teams I have worked with in the past have had various
        documents
        hanging around their Scrum/sprint board. Primary team goal statements,
        team
        values, sprint goals, etc. You could have smaller one page versions of
        one
        or more personas and hang them there if your teams have such a setup.

        The idea of a persona screensaver seems cool for sure, but it's only
        there
        when the worker is away, although it would be visible to anyone else
        around
        which would definitely be beneficial. Just doesn't seem like the best
        place
        for primary access to personas.

        What really has worked for me in the past when it comes to communicating
        any
        type of research/user modeling is two things:

        1. Quick, verbal reports of research findings. Often I would invite the
        team
        to a 10-15 minute synopsis of recent research findings, followed by a
        team
        discussion. Usually a more formal version of the research would get
        posted
        on a wiki.

        2. Role sharing. The best way to get developers to really pay attention
        to
        research is to put them in a position where they really *need* it to
        make
        decisions. Collaborative design sessions, where participants bring in
        sketches that solve a design problem to be critiqued by the entire team
        have
        worked wonders in communicating research findings - each participant is
        has
        a huge incentive to leverage the research in order to make design
        decisions.
        This approach has a lot of other benefits as well.

        Hope this helps,

        Jeff

        On Tue, Jun 3, 2008 at 1:35 PM, Leina <leina_elgohari@...> wrote:

        > Our outputs for our persona/segmentation work are usually in A1
        poster
        > format.
        >
        > In the age of hot-desking where developers have no place to position
        > anything such as a posters (even if it is done in minature form) there
        > is a need to create less physical forms of distributing the persona
        > work. Providing PowerPoint slides is not seen as highly desirable
        > however, creating an animated persona screen saver may be seen as a
        > possible solution. But we need to make it highly attractive for
        > developers to be proud to have it as their screen saver.
        >
        > Do others have any other suggestions?
        > Many Thanks
        > Lee
        >
        >
        >

        Messages in this topic (3)
        ________________________________________________________________________
        2b. Re: Distributing Persona Work to Developers
        Posted by: "William Pietri" william@... william_pietri
        Date: Wed Jun 4, 2008 9:12 am ((PDT))

        Leina wrote:
        > In the age of hot-desking where developers have no place to position
        > anything such as a posters [...]

        One team I coached dealt with this by having a number of portable or
        mobile whiteboards. Wherever the team went, so did the team environment.

        William
      • lanehalley
        I agree that this is a really useful technique for helping your personas stay relevant and alive. The more you help people identify behavior patterns in the
        Message 3 of 5 , Jun 9, 2008
        • 0 Attachment
          I agree that this is a really useful technique for helping your
          personas stay relevant and alive. The more you help people identify
          behavior patterns in the real world and tie them back to your persona
          set, the more likely they will remember the personas and use them as a
          design tool.

          -lane

          --- In agile-usability@yahoogroups.com, "Baker, Lisa" <lisa.baker@...>
          wrote:
          >
          <clip>...
          >
          > ... When out on trips I typically email back a quick briefing of the
          > trip and try to tie in a persona name of the type of person (or
          > people) we talked to... then we use the persona name in use cases,
          > etc.
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.