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The Story Definition of "DONE DONE." Where Does the Usability / UI Design Fit?

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  • imaginethepoet
    On many projects using an agile approach we run into problems with different teams agreeing on the definition of done done. Developers say it is DONE DONE
    Message 1 of 248 , May 13, 2008
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      On many projects using an agile approach we run into problems with
      different teams agreeing on the definition of "done done." Developers
      say it is "DONE DONE" the moment the story is functionig. Now if the
      story is sliced appropriately it may be just a simple yet valuable
      piece of functionality. Of course, this is usability group and that
      is what I do UI/Interaction Design. I want to see and hear other
      peoples approaches to the inclusion of UI design into an agile
      process.

      I know there are many answers and many more questions on where does
      the "UI portion" get developed in the story. So I'm not going to
      provide any answer or practices I do. What I want to see is how those
      that use Story cards, tasks, sprint planning, and release planning
      figure out when to load UI stories (if at all).

      So let the discussion begin!

      I have added this an open discussion at my new forums as well(to keep
      better track of this). If anyone wants to talk about this indepth. I
      know I do!

      http://www.uidesignguide.com/design_forum/comments.php?
      DiscussionID=1&page=1#Item_1
    • Desilets, Alain
      ... in ... That s such a great idea! Every developer needs a license to hack every once in a while. It s good for mental hygiene ;-). Alain
      Message 248 of 248 , Jun 4, 2008
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        > Another is to encourage people to have wild ideas. One client has a
        > monthly hack day, where people are encouraged to try out crazy stuff.
        > Another has beers once a week, with bold notions jotted down and put
        in
        > the backlog for later examination.

        That's such a great idea! Every developer needs a license to hack every
        once in a while. It's good for mental hygiene ;-).

        Alain
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