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need a word

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  • Jean Richardson
    I m writing an SRS for a new app related to an existing app, and I need to refer to certain metaphors in the old app. I m not sure that metaphor is the
    Message 1 of 5 , Aug 27, 2007
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      I’m writing an SRS for a new app related to an existing app, and I need to refer to certain “metaphors” in the old app.  I’m not sure that “metaphor” is the right word.  We have four things that are related to each other:  Scope, Layout, Analysis, and Reports.  Each of these things exists for the user as a “thing” in the application.  There are many scopes, layouts, analyses, and reports, and these scopes and reports item have a many-to-many relationship to each other.  What it the appropriate noun to use when referring to all four of these things at once?  Are they metaphors in the interface?

       

      Help!

       

      -- Jean

       

      Jean Richardson , PMP

      Senior Business Systems Analyst

      Harland Financial Solutions

      400 SW 6th Ave

      Portland OR 97204

      (503) 790-9222 x2390

      jean.richardson@...

       

    • Jason Goodwin
      Can you just make up a word? - SLAR comes to mind. What s an SRS, btw? ... -- Jason Goodwin justmyhead@gmail.com http://agiledesigner.blogspot.com
      Message 2 of 5 , Aug 27, 2007
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        Can you just make up a word? - SLAR comes to mind. What's an SRS, btw?

        On 8/27/07, Jean Richardson < jean.richardson@...> wrote:

        I'm writing an SRS for a new app related to an existing app, and I need to refer to certain "metaphors" in the old app.  I'm not sure that "metaphor" is the right word.  We have four things that are related to each other:  Scope, Layout, Analysis, and Reports.  Each of these things exists for the user as a "thing" in the application.  There are many scopes, layouts, analyses, and reports, and these scopes and reports item have a many-to-many relationship to each other.  What it the appropriate noun to use when referring to all four of these things at once?  Are they metaphors in the interface?

         

        Help!

         

        -- Jean

         

        Jean Richardson, PMP

        Senior Business Systems Analyst

        Harland Financial Solutions

        400 SW 6th Ave

        Portland OR 97204

        (503) 790-9222 x2390

        jean.richardson@...

         




        --
        Jason Goodwin
        justmyhead@...
        http://agiledesigner.blogspot.com
      • marjoriepries
        ... things ... What does the user call these things when they talk about them in their day-to-day work? Some terms come to mind --- Components , functional
        Message 3 of 5 , Aug 27, 2007
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          --- In agile-usability@yahoogroups.com, "Jean Richardson"
          <jean.richardson@...> wrote:
          >
          >.... We have four things that are related to
          > each other: Scope, Layout, Analysis, and Reports. Each of these
          things
          > exists for the user as a "thing" in the application. There are many
          > scopes, layouts, analyses, and reports, and these scopes and reports
          > item have a many-to-many relationship to each other. What it the
          > appropriate noun to use when referring to all four of these things at
          > once? Are they metaphors in the interface?

          What does the user call these things when they talk about them in their
          day-to-day work?

          Some terms come to mind --- "Components", "functional areas," "work
          areas", --- for example, but whatever term you settle on should reflect
          the users mental image and working language. Since your application is
          being used to support some business activity that has a tangible
          outcome, the best term to use is a term that names that outcome or
          names the physical thing that users employ to collect or refer to the
          physical outputs of your application.

          For example, if your application supports design activity related to
          physical construction projects then maybe "project" (the outcome)
          or "portfolio", (the storage device) or "proposal" resonates with your
          users. Or maybe this application is for production of print or web
          publications, then you could consider a term like "publication". Or
          maybe this is an application for managing an advisory engagement
          (consulting work) -- then "engagement" is a viable candidate.

          Aslong as the term is rooted in your users' culture it will work.
        • Joannes Vandermeulen
          ... I m writing an SRS for a new app related to an existing app, and I need to refer to certain metaphors in the old app.  I m not sure that metaphor is
          Message 4 of 5 , Aug 27, 2007
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            In agile-usability@yahoogroups.com Jean Richardson wrote:

            --------------
            I'm writing an SRS for a new app related to an existing app, and I need to refer to certain "metaphors" in the old app.  I'm not sure that "metaphor" is the right word.  We have four things that are related to each other:  Scope, Layout, Analysis, and Reports.  Each of these things exists for the user as a "thing" in the application.  There are many scopes, layouts, analyses, and reports, and these scopes and reports item have a many-to-many relationship to each other.  What it the appropriate noun to use when referring to all four of these things at once?  Are they metaphors in the interface?
            --------------

            Jean, assuming that SRS stands for Software Requirements Specification and that your intended readers are engineers, I'd call this coherent assembly of concepts a 'conceptual model'.

            If your target audience consists of designers or psychologists, 'mental model' will resonate. Mental models are akin to metaphors.

            If you target audience are users and you are looking for a label in the user interface under which to group the four concepts, try not to need the word. In naturalistic taxonomies, not all groups have labels.

            Joannes Vandermeulen, Namahn
          • Jean Richardson
            TKS. An SRS is a Software Requirements Specification. ________________________________ From: agile-usability@yahoogroups.com
            Message 5 of 5 , Aug 27, 2007
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              TKS.  An SRS is a Software Requirements Specification.

               


              From: agile-usability@yahoogroups.com [mailto:agile-usability@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Jason Goodwin
              Sent: Monday, August 27, 2007 11:39 AM
              To: agile-usability@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: [agile-usability] need a word

               

              Can you just make up a word? - SLAR comes to mind. What's an SRS, btw?

              On 8/27/07, Jean Richardson < jean.richardson@ harlandfs. com> wrote:

              I'm writing an SRS for a new app related to an existing app, and I need to refer to certain "metaphors" in the old app.  I'm not sure that "metaphor" is the right word.  We have four things that are related to each other:  Scope, Layout, Analysis, and Reports.  Each of these things exists for the user as a "thing" in the application.  There are many scopes, layouts, analyses, and reports, and these scopes and reports item have a many-to-many relationship to each other.  What it the appropriate noun to use when referring to all four of these things at once?  Are they metaphors in the interface?

               

              Help!

               

              -- Jean

               

              Jean Richardson, PMP

              Senior Business Systems Analyst

              Harland Financial Solutions

              400 SW 6th Ave

              Portland OR 97204

              (503) 790-9222 x2390

              jean.richardson@ harlandfs. com

               




              --
              Jason Goodwin
              justmyhead@gmail. com
              http://agiledesigne r.blogspot. com

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