Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Remote versus collocated teams.

Expand Messages
  • owen_paul_thomas
    Hello people. Maybe this is not a hotly debated topic any more since the outsourcing to India fire appears to have died down a little. I am 33 years old, and
    Message 1 of 146 , May 28, 2007
    • 0 Attachment
      Hello people.

      Maybe this is not a hotly debated topic any more since the
      outsourcing to India fire appears to have died down a little. I am 33
      years old, and got interested in software development a long time ago
      (when I was about 12) because as well as promising me a stimulating
      avenue to apply my prodigious intellect (no, truly), it was the ideal
      job that I could do without having to travel to or work in an office
      block with other people.

      More than twenty years on, I find that I am trapped in the absurd
      position where not only am I ensconced in a cubical, but that
      contemporary software development by and large, mandates collocation
      as a practise that is critical to the successful outcome of a
      project. The future is promising me no release from the clutches of
      this intrusive practise that is a vestige of the industrial era
      factory floor. While it appears as if a significant proportion of
      people find as I have, many also appear to have resigned themselves
      to the ignorant mediocrity of the masses.

      There appears to be very little comparative evidence between
      collocated and remote teams. All I hear is charismatic evangelists
      sprouting off the natural advantages that collocation offers, and
      condemning remote teaming. I'd like to use all of my charisma to
      point out that these people whom everyone dotes over for wisdom and
      guidance, appear to me, almost as ignorant as I am.

      What are people's opinions on what I've just said?

      I think there'd be a juicy PhD there for someone; maybe me. Although
      to be honest, I cut code. I'd rather be a code-cutting member of a
      remote, virtual team.

      Thanks for your consideration, and I'd love to hear what you've got
      to say.

      Owen.
    • kswaters1
      Here here Ron! Remote teamwork may be possible but it certainly isn t ideal. Close collaboration without co-location is a compromise, sometimes an essential
      Message 146 of 146 , Jul 11, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
        Here here Ron! Remote teamwork may be possible but it certainly
        isn't ideal. Close collaboration without co-location is a
        compromise, sometimes an essential one, but not one you'd advocate
        as part of any methodology.

        I sometimes like to think of this in terms of new business
        startups. How many people would start a business and think, "I
        know, let's base our development teams in multiple locations and
        have the business owners of the product we're building in a
        different place to the developers." For logistical reasons, sales
        and other field-based teams maybe, for product development I think
        not.

        Kelly Waters
        http://www.allaboutagile.com


        --- In agile-usability@yahoogroups.com, Ron Jeffries
        <ronjeffries@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hello, Owen. On Sunday, June 3, 2007, at 11:01:30 PM, you wrote:
        >
        > > I realise that many people aren't in my position such that they
        would
        > > want hard facts to decide. Many are going to trust the opinions
        of other
        > > people they may think have seasoned opinions, because they
        haven't got
        > > the time or the interest to decide for themselves. However, if
        John
        > > Kern's business, as a case in point, can demonstrate that the use
        > > communications tools to facilitate a remote team discussion is
        possible,
        > > then shouldn't the Agile community be a little less hard on
        remote
        > > teaming?
        >
        > Owen, even Jon said that together would be better. Why would we
        want
        > to recommend something that wasn't the best we know?
        >
        > Ron Jeffries
        > www.XProgramming.com
        > The fact that we know more today, and are more capable today,
        > is good news about today, not bad news about yesterday.
        >
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.