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Book Learning; was:Re: [agile-usability] Apprentiship and first person learning

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  • PaulOldfield1@aol.com
    (responding to Jeff) Sorry I m late, just catching up on my mail backlog... Saw this and just had to jump in. ... Strongly agreed. I recall the first time I
    Message 1 of 1 , Feb 24, 2007
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      (responding to Jeff)
       
      Sorry I'm late, just catching up on my mail backlog...
      Saw this and just had to jump in.
      > That experience changed the way I read books.  I now
      believe
      > there's something important every author can't get across
      in
      > their text - something important about the /way/ they
      practice. 
      > So, while I read the books, it's critical for me to find face
      time
      > with these thinkers to watch them work, hear some anecdotal
      > stories, and really understand what's important to
      them
       
      Strongly agreed. 
       
      I recall the first time I started reading 'agile' writings. I was doing
      quite well fitting in what was said to my current world view, and
      as a result just not 'getting' what the author was really saying.
       
      Then I started getting worried by the number of 'loose end'
      disconnects. I began to suspect that maybe I needed to change
      my world view (having needed to do that several times before,
      I spotted the symptoms).
       
      In this case, I thought a bit about what the author might mean,
      and began to realise that it fitted very well with the way I'd
      been developing software for the 7 years before I got inducted
      into the Rigorous Software Methodology way of thinking.
      What the agile approach was doing was adding rigour to the
      way I used to work.
       
      What books can't do for you very easily is change your world
      view. One has a natural tendency to fit any new ideas into an
      existing world view, and it's hard to change world view without
      some degree of interaction with a person that holds the new
      world view.
       
      Paul Oldfield
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