Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: being in the same room Re: [agile-usability] Re:are you making efficient designs?

Expand Messages
  • Jon Kern
    the team fracturing is not so much when we are in a war (?) room temporarily collaborating. but rather when folks go off on their own tangents, designing,
    Message 1 of 341 , Jan 31, 2007
      the team fracturing is not so much when we are in a "war" (?) room
      temporarily collaborating. but rather when folks go off on their own
      tangents, designing, coding, etc.

      some simple examples...

      when i worked with a team in St. Petersburg, RU, I would be onsite 2
      weeks per month. i would have been more effective being onsite 100% of
      the time. (We were developing software products at TogetherSoft.)
      However, being a distributed team meant i had to increase the level to
      which we ensured we always worked by being open, communicative, and
      extra visible. so, we were more certain to have collaborative tools...

      * tools to control the features -- not a bunch of cards physically
      limited to sitting in some room.
      * models and design ideas on wikis
      * design by interface to avoid dependencies whose impact can be
      exaggerated in distributed team dev
      * web meetings to discuss items with the team (usually said
      documentation and design ideas)
      * plans and progress visible in wiki

      the benefit? this not only served the local purposes of the team, but it
      was useful for anybody else who might be interested, or who wished to
      collaborate -- without having to be in the same room (or continent)

      some teams would be content with doing just enough to meet their local
      needs. which is fine. (an extreme example might be a solo developer that
      does not docs or design or project wiki.) my point was that if you want
      to succeed and you are doing distributed team dev, you better adopt some
      best practices that help keep everyone on the same page. this can lead
      to a distributed team having to go further than a local team would in
      terms of building a collaborative workspace and artifacts. Obviously,
      nothing precludes a local team from doing the same activities, it is
      just that a local team need not to it to succeed; whereas, a distributed
      team lives and dies by proper collaborative techniques and tools.

      maybe a corollary to my point... if you cannot do development well
      locally, you likely will not get any better results when you add in 12
      time zones.

      we have been doing agile development with teams across 4 continents
      now... with success. sure, sometimes i wish we were together, but skype
      and other techniques can help bridge the gap.

      jon
      blog: http://technicaldebt.com



      Desilets, Alain said the following on 1/31/07 10:15 AM:
      >
      > > what i was referring to was a case where teams in the same
      > > building had a habit of fracturing into little pockets of
      > > doing their own things, leaving other team members out of the
      > > conversations.
      >
      > Even when those various teams were all together in the same war room?
      >
      > I have seen teams located in the different parts of the same building
      > have little communication (in fact, I see it all the time) but never
      > when they are all together in a same room.
      >
      > I think we all agree that co-location does not GUARANTEE good
      > communication (alhtough in the case of people in a same war room, I
      > would say it's pretty close). But certainly, the solution is not to
      > break people further appart! So I'm still puzzled by what you wrote
      > earlier:
      >
      > > * being further apart can have the unintended consequence of
      > > engendering greater degrees of communication
      >
      > Have you actually seen this happen? If so, please share your experience,
      > because it's important.
      >
      > I'm not being sarcastic btw. Breakthroughs in science often come from
      > finding out that one of your mostly deeply held beliefs is (at least
      > partly) wrong.
      >
      > Alain
      >
      >
    • Alexander Johannesen
      ... I just got back from another planet, it seems, so pardon me for asking dumb questions, but what *did* you expect? I myself do a lot of agile UX (note,
      Message 341 of 341 , Feb 23, 2007
        On 2/23/07, Robert Hoekman, Jr. <rhoekmanjr@...> wrote:
        > Without any hard feelings intended, the best thing I could do here is to simply
        > stop engaging in this conversation. I'm sorry if this bothers you, but this list is
        > simply not what I hoped it would be, and I believe I need to explore my
        > interests elsewhere.

        I just got back from another planet, it seems, so pardon me for asking
        dumb questions, but what *did* you expect? I myself do a lot of agile
        UX (note, small 'a'; there is no Agile) and I'm on this list, so I'm
        curious about your "Great Wall of Agile on this list"; what is it?

        Sure, a lot of people have *their* meaning of Agile and their way of
        doing things, and as you say, that's ok. Do you feel some people
        advocate only one way of Agile, perhaps a tad too much? That their
        passion is getting in the way of pragmatism?


        Regards,

        Alex
        --
        ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Project Wrangler, SOA, Information Alchymist, UX, RESTafarian, Topic Maps
        ------------------------------------------ http://shelter.nu/blog/ --------
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.