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The "P" word

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  • Jon Kern
    Anyone work in an org that is concerned with Productivity of developers? see this post: http://technicaldebt.com/archives/2006_12.html#000581 curious what you
    Message 1 of 7 , Dec 15, 2006
      Anyone work in an org that is concerned with Productivity of developers?

      see this post: http://technicaldebt.com/archives/2006_12.html#000581

      curious what you have found/seen...

      --

      jon
      blog: http://technicaldebt.com
    • Adrian Howard
      ... And the connection to agile usability is? Adrian
      Message 2 of 7 , Dec 16, 2006
        On 16 Dec 2006, at 03:06, Jon Kern wrote:

        > Anyone work in an org that is concerned with Productivity of
        > developers?
        >
        > see this post: http://technicaldebt.com/archives/2006_12.html#000581
        >
        > curious what you have found/seen...

        And the connection to agile usability is?

        Adrian
      • Jon Kern
        the connection is... Some folks who get usability can arrive at a good UI design 10 times more quickly than another, or maybe the good design is never
        Message 3 of 7 , Dec 16, 2006
          the connection is...

          Some folks who "get" usability can arrive at a good UI design 10 times
          more quickly than another, or maybe the good design is never arrived at.

          And the client of said result may be none the wiser?

          How do you measure the goodness of the UI and the ROI of the effort to
          get there?

          jon
          blog: http://technicaldebt.com



          Adrian Howard said the following on 12/16/06 4:42 AM:
          >
          >
          > On 16 Dec 2006, at 03:06, Jon Kern wrote:
          >
          > > Anyone work in an org that is concerned with Productivity of
          > > developers?
          > >
          > > see this post: http://technicaldebt.com/archives/2006_12.html#000581
          > <http://technicaldebt.com/archives/2006_12.html#000581>
          > >
          > > curious what you have found/seen...
          >
          > And the connection to agile usability is?
          >
          > Adrian
          >
          >
        • Brian Weiss
          With existing, production products, that s easy. Increases in productivity, revenue or savings after UE review compared to my time and expenses to do the
          Message 4 of 7 , Dec 21, 2006
            With existing, production products, that's easy. Increases in productivity, revenue or savings after UE review compared to my time and expenses to do the review plus the cost of the implementation. ($15,000 to do study, $15,000 to implement changes, $300,000 increase in revenue, ROI = 10x) This satisfies the case of "A project team or a company likely has both A and B type developers, but rarely has the opportunity to compare parallel solutions to the same problem." "A" was current production, "B" is production after UE review.
             
            For new projects, at the company I'm at now, we measure ROI with project man hour savings, productivity increases by internal users and bottom line revenue or customer service savings for customer facing applications.
             
            Granted, this is *post* project. So on the first project, any company will just have to take a flier and trust the User Experience expert. It's alot easier to measure ROI after some metrics are in place.
             
            Here's how I've calculated ROI for internal facing projects for them: Per project, several serious usability problems are found in the business case and requirements gathering portion of the project by introducing wireframes to the users (or doing something else like card sorting or rapid prototyping). Given similar projects, we looked at man hours to fix UI/usability problems after code freeze and production. Multiplied number of problems found by UE review up front by the average man hours per incident/ticket/complaint compared to the hours it took to do review and came up with an ROI.
            ROI = # of UE problems found x post code freeze man hours per ticket
            compare that to time it took me to find and document those problems.
             
            Salary and benefits being equal (which we all know isn't exactly true) some issues can have a huge ROI...easy example: it could take 8 man hours to fix a small problem (like say rearranging main navigation in a web app) in production given issue diagnosis, problem ticket write up, code fix time, QA time and build to production time. Not to mention all the hands that have to touch a ticket like business owner, project manager, team manager etc...10 issues = 80 man hours. Compared to my time to find those issues - which could be as little as 20-40 hours...
             
            Added benefits but harder to quantify are customer satisfaction, uptime and resource freedom. The coders can move on to new projects quicker.
             
            For external, e-commerce things, all the above applies plus each moment the company isn't making or saving as much money as it could = ROI. For internal, all the above plus any quanifyable productivity increases applies (i.e. Suzie could input 15% more leads in the CRM tool during her work day after new interface).
             
            The CIO likes the approach I've taken as it gives her something tangible to show her peers - which helps me continue getting good projects and budget. The circle of life :)
             
            In new projects tho, the A vs B can't be shown up front. Only experience can guide a company there...
             
            -Brian


            Jon Kern <jonkern@...> wrote:
            the connection is...

            Some folks who "get" usability can arrive at a good UI design 10 times
            more quickly than another, or maybe the good design is never arrived at.

            And the client of said result may be none the wiser?

            How do you measure the goodness of the UI and the ROI of the effort to
            get there?

            jon
            blog: http://technicaldeb t.com

            Adrian Howard said the following on 12/16/06 4:42 AM:
            >
            >
            > On 16 Dec 2006, at 03:06, Jon Kern wrote:
            >
            > > Anyone work in an org that is concerned with Productivity of
            > > developers?
            > >
            > > see this post: http://technicaldeb t.com/archives/ 2006_12.html# 000581
            > <http://technicaldeb t.com/archives/ 2006_12.html# 000581>
            > >
            > > curious what you have found/seen.. .
            >
            > And the connection to agile usability is?
            >
            > Adrian
            >
            >

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          • Adrian Howard
            ... Actually - that s something that s become harder now that I work in more agile environments. In my pre-agile days my usability work mostly consisted of
            Message 5 of 7 , Jan 4, 2007
              On 16 Dec 2006, at 14:44, Jon Kern wrote:

              > the connection is...
              >
              > Some folks who "get" usability can arrive at a good UI design 10 times
              > more quickly than another, or maybe the good design is never
              > arrived at.
              >
              > And the client of said result may be none the wiser?
              >
              > How do you measure the goodness of the UI and the ROI of the effort to
              > get there?

              Actually - that's something that's become harder now that I work in
              more agile environments.

              In my pre-agile days my usability work mostly consisted of working
              separately from the development team - doing analysis work, or
              critiquing existing systems. In those cases it's fairly easy to see
              the effect of UI improvements since they're implemented in a separate
              process.

              For example if you redesign the UI of a search engine and it gets x10
              more usage - it's fairly easy to show that you've made an improvement.

              Now that the usability work I do is /much/ more integrated with the
              general development process it's much harder to separate it out and
              note what particular elements of UI work give the ROI.

              I wonder if this is one of the reasons some usability folk dislike
              agile methods. They're special sauce becomes less obvious...

              Curiously enough this doesn't appear to matter to the people I work
              with, since they're interested in the ROI of the product as a whole :-)

              Adrian
            • Tim Wright
              Hi Adrian, I m assuming you mean their instead of they re . Somehow I doubt that usability folk are special sauce... (usually I wouldn t bother replying,
              Message 6 of 7 , Jan 4, 2007
                Hi Adrian,

                I'm assuming you mean "their" instead of "they're". Somehow I doubt that usability folk are special sauce...

                (usually I wouldn't bother replying, but found this one quite amusing:)

                Tim


                On 1/5/07, Adrian Howard <adrianh@...> wrote:


                I wonder if this is one of the reasons some usability folk dislike
                agile methods. They're special sauce becomes less obvious...




                --
                Kei te kōrero tiki au. Kei te kōrero tiki koe. Ka kōrero tiki tāua. Kōrero ai tiki tāua.
              • Adrian Howard
                ... ... Adrian
                Message 7 of 7 , Jan 7, 2007
                  On 4 Jan 2007, at 21:36, Tim Wright wrote:

                  >
                  > Hi Adrian,
                  >
                  > I'm assuming you mean "their" instead of "they're". Somehow I doubt
                  > that usability folk are special sauce...
                  >
                  > (usually I wouldn't bother replying, but found this one quite
                  > amusing:)

                  <hangs head in shame>

                  :-)

                  Adrian
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