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RE: [agile-usability] Interaction design rules of thumb - do they exist?

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  • David LaRue
    ... Alain, I m enjoying this discussion. I do slightly resent the implication that pointers in C/C++ are somehow a bad thing. A good design in any language or
    Message 1 of 42 , Jul 11, 2006
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      On Tue, 11 Jul 2006 15:18:22 -0400, Desilets, Alain wrote:

      >! was mostly expressing my high level of frustration about Web apps in
      >general which I believe are much worse than traditional non web
      >applications (and that's not much to say).
      >
      >-- Alain:
      >Obviously you haven't used NRC's time tracking system, which is not a
      >web-based app (it's SAP based) ;-).
      >
      >But I agree with you that web apps in general seem less usable than
      >their offline counterparts. That COULD be due to what you mention, i.e.
      >the fact that you need to have to go through complex hoops in order to
      >achieve basic levels of interaction that are a lot easier to implement
      >in non Web applications. But I'm not sure. Many offline apps are
      >written in C/C++ and we all know the hoops you have to jump through to
      >make those work! Most web apps are implemented using languages that
      >don't require you to spend half your time chasing pointer bugs ;-).
      >-----

      Alain,

      I'm enjoying this discussion.

      I do slightly resent the implication that pointers in C/C++ are
      somehow a bad thing. A good design in any language or toolset
      should provide a reliable product. The pointer bugs are created
      by developers that don't understand their tools and use them
      unwisely - IMHO.

      I have a fairly rich set of C/C++ code for classic and web
      development and the tools rarely become a problem. Larger
      projects natually take a bit more thought.

      I think the problems on the development side stem from
      expecting too many novice and inexperienced people to
      create products and the tools to create them, and at
      the same time expect those developers and products to
      stand up against the mastery level expectations the
      general public would prefer.

      Just as many developers and managers don't really consider
      the implications of how their data entry tasks affect the
      user, the developers themselves don't consider the
      implications to the user or to themselves. To use a
      woodworking analogy -- the novice or home woodworker turns
      out mass produced goods that the world community finds less
      than perfect most of the time. Certainly a master craftsman
      would cost more, create more solid products, and hopefully
      injure themselves less often. It is easy to blame the hammer
      when you hit your thumb, but you were the one swinging the
      hammer in the first place. Likewise, those that choose to
      use C/C++ and pointer concepts and not take adequate steps
      to insure a quality product, may have the world see what
      a shoddy product they created in the first place.

      Perhaps the best rule to remember is that your product will
      be used and misused by any number of people and the
      responsibility for the good or bad that comes from it rests
      with the people who develop the product as much as those that
      use and abuse it.

      David
    • Chris Pehura
      For me, I found sequence diagrams work well. Buy it may just be my style. Chris Pehura chris@pehura.com 630-696-8101 ... From: Desilets, Alain
      Message 42 of 42 , Jul 14, 2006
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        For me, I found sequence diagrams work well. Buy it may just be my style.

        Chris Pehura
        chris@...
        630-696-8101

        -----Original Message-----
        From: "Desilets, Alain" <alain.desilets@...>
        Date: Fri, 14 Jul 2006 07:20:27
        To:<agile-usability@yahoogroups.com>
        Subject: RE: [agile-usability] Interaction design rules of thumb - do they exist?

        BTW, one of the things that doesn't work often enough is asking the users to report what they were doing. Many times I have seen users do one thing and then tell me that they did it differently. I would have doubted my sanity if I hadn't had co-observers with me. 
         
        -- Alain:
        Does this happen even in talk-aloud situations?
        ----
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