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RE: [agile-usability] business reqs and ucd

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  • Miinalainen, Petteri
    Age old problem - cost. You can either do eveything that is needed at variable cost. Or then you can do what you can with fixed (low) costs. Your just can t
    Message 1 of 62 , May 23, 2006
      Age old problem - cost. You can either do eveything that is needed at variable cost. Or then you can do what you can with fixed (low) costs. Your just can't have them both.
      I can offer only some practical advice on how to keep your workload/ cost as low as possible - and you should take with a grain of salt!
       
      Things to consider:
      -explain that you cannot fully take responsibility on usability of the finished product without necessary steps
       
      -explain that fixed cost must be based on your estimate (otherwise you can only do as much as the money lasts, unless this is strategically important client)
       
      -explain that you want them to sign-off on some draft of the IA design. *And that things not included in the draft are not included without extra cost/ TnM
       
      -ask your client to select major features that you would prototype to full extent. Create only wireframes of the less important features. Use the 20 /80 rule:
          -ask your stakeholders to name the 3 most important things a visitor should be able to do with the service.
           (some priorization is necessary)
          -test these features with your co-workers and then have a walk-through with (some of) your stakeholders.
           (some form of testing is necessary)
       
      In situations like this, I then try to use UI design patterns that have worked in similar situations /designs. I'd make a draft of the overall design, navigation design, IA etc. Then i'd try to make the client sign-off on that. Only after that i would create an extensive prototype and only from agreed on features. Otherwise, you'll end up redoing the prototype quite a few times :-)
       
      Hope this gives some ideas. Cheers,
       
      Petteri
       
       


      From: agile-usability@yahoogroups.com [mailto:agile-usability@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Colette Elisa Buscarini
      Sent: 23. toukokuuta 2006 13:44
      To: agile-usability@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: RE: [agile-usability] business reqs and ucd

      My other issue here cost.  When your client (private or government) expect you to deliver an on-line solution under a pre-defined budget/time, you find yourself having to create an information architecture/UI prototype based on thin air.  As the lead IA and usability consultant, I find myself having to create a full site architecture based upon marketing and branding requirements...there is no time/money to to do the right thing...interviewing users and stakeholders, defining business strategy, defining business processes, providing use cases...and put together a user requirement document.  As part of the digital team, WE seem to re-invent the wheel each time!
       
      What is the best approach when business reqs and UCD do not apply and the company (who is a London, UK, leading branding and marketing agency) runs their digital projects as their print/campaign based work?  
       
      Thank you.
       
      Colette
       
       
       
       


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    • William Pietri
      ... Which, honestly, I don t think is unreasonable. From the perspective of the waterfall person, all problems can be solved with a little more planning, and
      Message 62 of 62 , Aug 31, 2006
        Alexander Johannesen wrote:
        > If you can hide your work from them,
        > then great, but there is this notion of teamwork going on here that
        > requires a certain ... mediation to old progroms.
        >

        Which, honestly, I don't think is unreasonable. From the perspective of
        the waterfall person, all problems can be solved with a little more
        planning, and failing to plan it all up front looks dangerous and the
        fast route to failure. Until you have seen it work, it's easy to believe
        that agile processes are impossible. I sure did.

        When dealing with people like that I'll generally try one of two
        approaches. The first is "Well, let's try an experiment." We find some
        level of risk that they are comfortable with and try out agile methods
        in that context. If the experiment is a success, we try a bigger experiment.

        The other is, "You do what you think it takes." If they want a big spec,
        then sure, they can write one up as we have our discussions around the
        product. If they think a continuously updated spec is important, then
        great, they should keep updating it. If they want a big MS Project
        thingy, fine, we'll make sure all the necessary data is on our wall of
        cards.

        I don't know if those are helpful to you, but they've worked for me.

        William
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