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looking for the name of a visual design technique

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  • Jeff Patton
    When working on fine grain visual design changes I find that I ll make a change then have to flip back to the way it was before the change to really
    Message 1 of 8 , Apr 5 4:37 PM
      When working on fine grain visual design changes I find that I'll make
      a change then have to flip back to the way it was before the change
      to really understand the impact - and then back to the change again.
      Basically the way to best see the change is by seeing the screen
      without the change then as quickly as possible with the change.

      The same thing happens with ctrl-z in Photoshop - it toggles between
      undo and redo to let you flip back and forth between a change you just
      made. Now that I know what that feature is for, I find it handy.

      And, I think it's sort of the same thing my optometrist does when I'm
      getting a new lense prescription: "Is A clearer, or is B clearer? A
      or B.... A or B."

      Basically when differences are slight, it's hard to detect the
      "quality" of the difference without oscillating between both options.

      This seems like a common technique that there has to be a name for -
      and I'm wondering if anyone knows what it is.

      Finally, part of the reason I ask is because I hit lots of these sorts
      of decision points daily. Points where I really can't tell the
      difference between one decision and another without comparing the
      outcome of each quickly.

      What's the name of this technique? Does anyone know an optometrist?

      thanks,

      -Jeff
    • William Pietri
      ... I don t know what designers call it, but I know astronomers make use of a device called a blink comparator: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blink_comparator
      Message 2 of 8 , Apr 5 4:58 PM
        Jeff Patton wrote:
        > Basically when differences are slight, it's hard to detect the
        > "quality" of the difference without oscillating between both options.
        >
        > This seems like a common technique that there has to be a name for -
        > and I'm wondering if anyone knows what it is.

        I don't know what designers call it, but I know astronomers make use of
        a device called a blink comparator:

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blink_comparator

        William
      • Sue Heim
        I use layers in PhotoShop to do basically the same thing. You can turn a layer on and off, to see if you like whatever it is. But as to the name of the
        Message 3 of 8 , Apr 5 5:02 PM
          I use layers in PhotoShop to do basically the same thing. You can turn a
          layer on and off, to see if you like whatever it is.

          But as to the name of the toggling feature, nope. No idea. This one? That
          one? Can you hear me now? :)

          ...sue


          >From: "Jeff Patton" <jpatton@...>
          >Reply-To: agile-usability@yahoogroups.com
          >To: agile-usability@yahoogroups.com
          >Subject: [agile-usability] looking for the name of a visual design
          >technique
          >Date: Wed, 05 Apr 2006 23:37:23 -0000
          >
          >When working on fine grain visual design changes I find that I'll make
          >a change then have to flip back to the way it was before the change
          >to really understand the impact - and then back to the change again.
          >Basically the way to best see the change is by seeing the screen
          >without the change then as quickly as possible with the change.
          >
          >The same thing happens with ctrl-z in Photoshop - it toggles between
          >undo and redo to let you flip back and forth between a change you just
          >made. Now that I know what that feature is for, I find it handy.
          >
          >And, I think it's sort of the same thing my optometrist does when I'm
          >getting a new lense prescription: "Is A clearer, or is B clearer? A
          >or B.... A or B."
          >
          >Basically when differences are slight, it's hard to detect the
          >"quality" of the difference without oscillating between both options.
          >
          >This seems like a common technique that there has to be a name for -
          >and I'm wondering if anyone knows what it is.
          >
          >Finally, part of the reason I ask is because I hit lots of these sorts
          >of decision points daily. Points where I really can't tell the
          >difference between one decision and another without comparing the
          >outcome of each quickly.
          >
          >What's the name of this technique? Does anyone know an optometrist?
          >
          >thanks,
          >
          >-Jeff
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
        • Larry Constantine
          ... Engineers sometimes refer to this technique as A-B-ing but I have also heard the term used to refer to side-by-side comparison of two approaches--another
          Message 4 of 8 , Apr 6 1:09 AM
            Jeff wrote:

            > And, I think it's sort of the same thing my optometrist does when I'm
            > getting a new lense prescription: "Is A clearer, or is B clearer? A
            > or B.... A or B."
            >
            > Basically when differences are slight, it's hard to detect the
            > "quality" of the difference without oscillating between both options.
            >
            > This seems like a common technique that there has to be a name for -
            > and I'm wondering if anyone knows what it is.
            >
            > What's the name of this technique? Does anyone know an optometrist?

            Engineers sometimes refer to this technique as "A-B-ing" but I have also
            heard the term used to refer to side-by-side comparison of two
            approaches--another design operation I often use.

            --Larry Constantine, IDSA
          • Bruce Tsuji
            In psychology this is called the method of paired comparisons. If you have 20 things to compare, you take every possible pair of items and ask for a judgment.
            Message 5 of 8 , Apr 6 7:02 AM
              In psychology this is called the method of paired comparisons. If you
              have 20 things to compare, you take every possible pair of items and
              ask for a judgment. See
              http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paired_comparisons

              Best regards,

              -Bruce Tsuji.

              On 4/6/06, Larry Constantine <lconstantine@...> wrote:
              >
              > Jeff wrote:
              >
              > > And, I think it's sort of the same thing my optometrist does when I'm
              > > getting a new lense prescription: "Is A clearer, or is B clearer? A
              > > or B.... A or B."
              > >
              > > Basically when differences are slight, it's hard to detect the
              > > "quality" of the difference without oscillating between both options.
              > >
              > > This seems like a common technique that there has to be a name for -
              > > and I'm wondering if anyone knows what it is.
              > >
              > > What's the name of this technique? Does anyone know an optometrist?
              >
              > Engineers sometimes refer to this technique as "A-B-ing" but I have also
              > heard the term used to refer to side-by-side comparison of two
              > approaches--another design operation I often use.
              >
              > --Larry Constantine, IDSA
              >
              >
              >
              > Jeff wrote:
              >
              > > And, I think it's sort of the same thing my optometrist does when I'm
              > > getting a new lense prescription: "Is A clearer, or is B clearer? A
              > > or B.... A or B."
              > >
              > > Basically when differences are slight, it's hard to detect the
              > > "quality" of the difference without oscillating between both options.
              > >
              > > This seems like a common technique that there has to be a name for -
              > > and I'm wondering if anyone knows what it is.
              > >
              > > What's the name of this technique? Does anyone know an optometrist?
              >
              > Engineers sometimes refer to this technique as "A-B-ing" but I have also
              > heard the term used to refer to side-by-side comparison of two
              > approaches--another design operation I often use.
              >
              > --Larry Constantine, IDSA
              >
              >
              >
              >
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            • Jade Ohlhauser
              I think it s called a subjective refraction test. That device you look through during the test is called a phoropter.
              Message 6 of 8 , Apr 6 7:58 AM
                I think it's called a "subjective refraction" test. That device you look through during the test is called a phoropter.
                 
                Sorry, that's not a very cool name. Tell you what, you can call it a "Jade's Test" if you like.
                 

                Jade Ohlhauser
                Product Manager
                RPM Software                          
                www.rpmsoftware.com 403-265-6727

                 


                From: agile-usability@yahoogroups.com [mailto:agile-usability@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Jeff Patton
                Sent: Wednesday, April 05, 2006 5:37 PM
                To: agile-usability@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: [agile-usability] looking for the name of a visual design technique

                When working on fine grain visual design changes I find that I'll make
                a  change then have to flip back to the way it was before the change
                to really understand the impact - and then back to the change again.
                Basically the way to best see the change is by seeing the screen
                without the change then as quickly as possible with the change. 

                The same thing happens with ctrl-z in Photoshop - it toggles between
                undo and redo to let you flip back and forth between a change you just
                made.  Now that I know what that feature is for, I find it handy.

                And, I think it's sort of the same thing my optometrist does when I'm
                getting a new lense prescription: "Is A clearer, or is B clearer?  A
                or B.... A or B."

                Basically when differences are slight, it's hard to detect the
                "quality" of the difference without oscillating between both options.

                This seems like a common technique that there has to be a name for -
                and I'm wondering if anyone knows what it is.

                Finally, part of the reason I ask is because I hit lots of these sorts
                of decision points daily.  Points where I really can't tell the
                difference between one decision and another without comparing the
                outcome of each quickly.

                What's the name of this technique?  Does anyone know an optometrist?

                thanks,

                -Jeff



              • Phlip
                ... That s called blink comparator , and astronomers used it to find stars & planets, back in the days of big negatives. -- Phlip
                Message 7 of 8 , Apr 6 11:06 AM
                  Jeff Patton wrote:

                  > When working on fine grain visual design changes I find that I'll make
                  > a change then have to flip back to the way it was before the change
                  > to really understand the impact - and then back to the change again.
                  > Basically the way to best see the change is by seeing the screen
                  > without the change then as quickly as possible with the change.
                  >
                  > The same thing happens with ctrl-z in Photoshop - it toggles between
                  > undo and redo to let you flip back and forth between a change you just
                  > made. Now that I know what that feature is for, I find it handy.

                  That's called "blink comparator", and astronomers used it to find
                  stars & planets, back in the days of big negatives.

                  --
                  Phlip
                  http://www.greencheese.org/ZeekLand <-- NOT a blog!!
                • Jade Ohlhauser
                  So let s call it a blink comparison Jade Ohlhauser Product Manager RPM Software www.rpmsoftware.com
                  Message 8 of 8 , Apr 6 11:20 AM
                    So let's call it a "blink comparison"
                     

                    Jade Ohlhauser
                    Product Manager
                    RPM Software                          
                    www.rpmsoftware.com 403-265-6727

                     


                    From: agile-usability@yahoogroups.com [mailto:agile-usability@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Phlip
                    Sent: Thursday, April 06, 2006 12:06 PM
                    To: agile-usability@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: Re: [agile-usability] looking for the name of a visual design technique

                    Jeff Patton wrote:

                    > When working on fine grain visual
                    design changes I find that I'll make
                    > a  change then have to flip
                    back to the way it was before the change
                    > to really understand the impact
                    - and then back to the change again.
                    > Basically the way to best see the
                    change is by seeing the screen
                    > without the change then as quickly as
                    possible with the change.
                    >
                    > The same thing happens with ctrl-z in
                    Photoshop - it toggles between
                    > undo and redo to let you flip back and
                    forth between a change you just
                    > made.  Now that I know what that
                    feature is for, I find it handy.

                    That's called "blink comparator", and astronomers used it to find
                    stars & planets, back in the days of big negatives.

                    --
                      Phlip
                      http://www.greencheese.org/ZeekLand  <-- NOT a blog!!
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