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How to copy files to an iPod?

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  • Phlip
    Guys: My imp got an iPod nano. How do I copy MP3 files into it (from PC)? The iTunes GUI doesn t seem to have a button for this. Note this is a meta-question,
    Message 1 of 7 , Jan 22, 2006
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      Guys:

      My imp got an iPod nano.

      How do I copy MP3 files into it (from PC)?

      The iTunes GUI doesn't seem to have a button for this.

      Note this is a meta-question, folks.

      --
      Phlip
      http://www.greencheese.org/ZeekLand <-- NOT a blog!!
    • Phlip
      ... Now if iPod was invented by the greatest usability experts in the world, why should a GUI specialist have to ask such a question? At least I wasn t asking
      Message 2 of 7 , Sep 9, 2006
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        > My imp got an iPod nano.

        > How do I copy MP3 files into it (from PC)?

        Now if iPod was invented by the greatest usability experts in the world, why
        should a GUI specialist have to ask such a question?

        At least I wasn't asking "where's the Delete key on my Mac?"...

        Here's what was happening. To get the iPod icon in the iTunes interface, you
        have to plug in the iPod, and let its driver raise iTunes automatically.

        This means when my Imp wants to charge her iPod, I have her plug it into a
        computer without iTunes installed. Because when iTunes pops up, it switches
        the desktop preferrences (without permission) so all my MP3s and online
        radio run in iTunes.

        Oh, and it changes them for every user, not just the currently logged in
        user. And it changes them each time, not just the first time it runs.

        Then, to add insult to attrocity, if the iPod is registered to one user (my
        Imp), and I plug in the iPod while another user is active (me), the iPod
        pretends it thinks I'm trying to "borrow" the tunes locked in its storage,
        and it offers to switch ownership to me and erase the iPod.

        Focus on the line "pretends it thinks". That's what it's all about, folks.
        Ripping people off under the excuse you are preventing them from ripping you
        off.

        --
        Phlip
        http://www.greencheese.us/ZeekLand <-- NOT a blog!!!
      • Desilets, Alain
        ... Yep. Now buy a new computer and see how long it will take you to transfer your iPod songs to that new computer. Took me the better part of a day to do it,
        Message 3 of 7 , Sep 11, 2006
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          > > My imp got an iPod nano.
          >
          > > How do I copy MP3 files into it (from PC)?
          >
          > Now if iPod was invented by the greatest usability experts in
          > the world, why
          > should a GUI specialist have to ask such a question?

          Yep. Now buy a new computer and see how long it will take you to
          transfer your iPod songs to that new computer. Took me the better part
          of a day to do it, hunting around in various forums and mailing list.
          The solution involved copying all my iTunes files to an external HD,
          then copying them to the new computer, and then registering the new
          computer so that it could use tunes from my iTunes account.

          So much for Apple Usability. I must admit thouh, Napster is no better
          either, as I have ranted about previously on this list.

          Alain
        • Phlip
          ... But.. but you might be STEALING those songs! (Put another way, iPod s number 1 customer is the RIAA, not you!) Then a Mac-rophile visits and sees my music
          Message 4 of 7 , Sep 11, 2006
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            Desilets, Alain wrote:

            > Yep. Now buy a new computer and see how long it will take you to
            > transfer your iPod songs to that new computer.

            But.. but you might be STEALING those songs!

            (Put another way, iPod's number 1 customer is the RIAA, not you!)

            Then a Mac-rophile visits and sees my music library, stored as, uh,
            files, and the first thing he asks is "why aren't you using iTunes",
            as if the choice was obvious. (Like "Why aren't you usind TDD?")

            Sigh...

            --
            Phlip
            http://c2.com/cgi/wiki?ZeekLand <-- NOT a blog!!
          • Adrian Howard
            On 11 Sep 2006, at 14:29, Phlip wrote: [snip] ... [snip] Don t get be started on the iPod s modal volume control :-) To bring this vaguely on topic... Would an
            Message 5 of 7 , Sep 11, 2006
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              On 11 Sep 2006, at 14:29, Phlip wrote:
              [snip]
              > Then a Mac-rophile visits and sees my music library, stored as, uh,
              > files, and the first thing he asks is "why aren't you using iTunes",
              > as if the choice was obvious. (Like "Why aren't you usind TDD?")
              [snip]

              Don't get be started on the iPod's modal volume control :-)

              To bring this vaguely on topic...

              Would an agile approach have built a better product?

              Adrian
            • mobilehaqwin
              ... Well, there are a bit of a difference here. The software part yes, maybe. Or maybe just to check what people actually whant to have, instead of focusing on
              Message 6 of 7 , Sep 11, 2006
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                --- In agile-usability@yahoogroups.com, Adrian Howard <adrianh@...> wrote:
                > Would an agile approach have built a better product?

                Well, there are a bit of a difference here. The software part yes, maybe. Or maybe just to check what people actually whant to have, instead of focusing on the shiny white plasic.

                However, the hardware part is harder to do fully agile, when a button is place its hard to move around. You can't just refactor the hardware of iPod without considerable cost. But the paper (or in this case shiny white plastic) mockup could be done agile. And yes I think both hardware and software would be better.

                / Håkan Reis / Dotway / http://blog.reis.se 


              • david broschinsky
                if you are doing a full hardware build, yes a button is hard to move. If you are making mockups with modeling materials,(wood, shaped plastics or even clay to
                Message 7 of 7 , Sep 12, 2006
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                  if you are doing a full hardware build, yes a button is hard to move.
                  If you are making mockups with modeling materials,(wood, shaped plastics
                  or even clay to start with) the ability to change a button becomes much
                  easier. Very akin to paper prototyping which I would recommend to anyone.

                  daveb

                  mobilehaqwin wrote:
                  >
                  > However, the hardware part is harder to do fully agile, when a button
                  > is place its hard to move around. You can't just refactor the hardware
                  > of iPod without considerable cost. But the paper (or in this case
                  > shiny white plastic) mockup could be done agile. And yes I think both
                  > hardware and software would be better.
                  >
                  > / Håkan Reis / Dotway <http://www.dotway.se> / http://blog.reis.se
                  >
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