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Re: {Possible Spam?} [agile-usability] bug or missing feature?, was: just one bug's enough to make a program useless

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  • Jeff Patton
    ... In the situation I was thinking about, making changes to the delivered product to better support testers would have broken business rules in the
    Message 1 of 23 , Jan 3, 2006
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      --- In agile-usability@yahoogroups.com, Brian Marick <marick@t...>
      wrote:
      > P.S. Making changes to improve the usability for testers does have
      > business value, unless their time costs nothing. I have some faith,
      > but no evidence, that it would also improve the code, much like
      > catering to JUnit or Fit does.

      In the situation I was thinking about, making changes to the delivered
      product to better support testers would have broken business rules in
      the application. Basically it would have made it easier/faster for the
      tester to set up and tear down test data by forgoing some of the rules
      around creating and deleting - and also installing quick navigation to
      jump from creation directly to transaction entry, again, inapropriate
      for our app, but workflow the testers did often.

      Alain is right that lots of these tedious bits of testing should be
      automated.

      You're right that spending a little money to help testers complete
      their work faster - or not go crazy doing it - is a good idea. We just
      need to know why we're doing it. If it was a feature strictly for
      testing, I'd want some way to hide or disable it from a production
      release.

      But, your point is well taken. Also Michael's point you referred to as
      well.

      thanks,

      -Jeff
    • Larry Constantine
      ... Many bugs (both code bugs and usability defects) can be avoided by effective design practices and found prior to having running software through
      Message 2 of 23 , Jan 4, 2006
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        Alain wrote:

        > By their nature, bugs cannot be caught by design. They can only be
        > caught after the buggy implementation has been implemented. This is one
        > of the great advantage of early delivery and TDD. They allow you to get
        > actual running software in the hands of users early, and catch bugs
        > early on in the process.

        Many bugs (both code bugs and usability defects) can be avoided by effective
        design practices and found prior to having running software through
        inspections and walkthroughs. Multiple research studies and extensive
        practice have shown inspections to be more cost effective than is testing
        for finding and eliminating bugs (both kinds).

        --Larry Constantine, IDSA [mailto:lconstantine@...]
          Chief Scientist | Constantine & Lockwood, Ltd.

        > -----Original Message-----
        > From: agile-usability@yahoogroups.com
        [mailto:agile-usability@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
        > Of Desilets, Alain
        > Sent: Tuesday, 03 January 2006 11:40 AM
        > To: agile-usability@yahoogroups.com
        > Subject: RE: [agile-usability] just one bug's enough to make a program
        useless
        >
        > How can we usabilitists catch these blind spots in design, before they
        > lose us customers?
        >
        > -- Alain:
        > Sorry for late response... Catching up on pre-Xmas break email.
        >
        > ----
        >
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