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RE: [agile-usability] Why are we here? (Was QWERTY, mouse, and novel input)

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  • Dymond, Robin
    Thanks Ron. This is starting to hit on it. On good Agile teams, cross functional team members are critical. Having: * Testers that can create requirements, *
    Message 1 of 1 , Dec 7, 2005
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      Thanks Ron. This is starting to hit on it.

      On good Agile teams, cross functional team members are critical. Having:
      * Testers that can create requirements,
      * Business analysts that can test,
      * Testers that can create automated tests,
      * Developers that can create tests,
      * Developers that can understand the business goals and language of the
      customer,
      * PMs that can pick up in any of these areas, and
      * PMs that are servant/leaders that can quickly remove impediments to
      team progress

      So we have a good group of problem solvers with their unique expertise
      and perspective do these things to create software. The least
      crossfunctional tasks are development tasks.

      What activities do we include from UX, and when? How does the UX person
      participate in this team?

      - Robin Dymond.


      -----Original Message-----
      From: agile-usability@yahoogroups.com
      [mailto:agile-usability@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Ron Vutpakdi
      Sent: Wednesday, December 07, 2005 2:19 PM
      To: agile-usability@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [agile-usability] Re: QWERTY, mouse, and novel input


      --- In agile-usability@yahoogroups.com, "Dymond, Robin"
      <robin.dymond@c...> wrote:
      >
      > How come no one in this group is discussing ideas on integrating
      > usability and agile?
      >
      We have before, just not recently. You might want to check the
      archives.

      > How are you integrating agile
      > methods with usability ideas on a daily basis? Are you? Or do you have

      > waterfall processes, in which the IAs do usability as part of the
      > "Design" process, with mockups from photoshop, that may or may not
      > become actual software?

      A number of people are integrating agile and usability successfully.
      One method is to basically be one iteration or otherwise just slightly
      ahead of the developers while trying to keep an eye out for a general
      idea of what might be coming down the road.

      On the usability and design side, a lot of practices involve scaling
      activities appropriately.

      On the development side, one practice seems to involve learning how to
      engage and consult usability rather than assuming that they don't
      matter.

      >
      > This group has been a bit of a disappointment. I think there is lots
      > of work to be done. Usability practitioners will benefit from better
      > integration with agile teams building better software quickly. But
      > teams will adopt Agile with or without usability practitioners or
      > their ideas on board.

      So it's just the usability practioners and designers who have to adapt,
      and not the whole team?

      >
      > But maybe, with all of the good feedback agile teams get from working
      > closely with a customer, usability is inherent, and IAs are largely
      > irrelevant for most projects?
      >

      Design still does matter as does usability. So does everyone learning
      how to work together as a team and draw from the best of everyone's
      skills so that the whole team is more than the sum of the individual
      members.

      I don't normally see teams where customers, through their feedback
      effectively design the internal or backend architecture. Why should
      the interface be any different? Yes, the feedback and input matter, are
      highly important, and should be used to influence the design.
      But, that doesn't mean that you want to give the customer the task of
      designing the interface for you.

      Ron







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