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RE: [agile-usability] Norman's Activity Centered Design - does it change anything?

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  • Desilets, Alain
    -- Larry wrote: So, yes, user interface design is not easy, and really good user interface design requires genuine talent that not everyone has and special
    Message 1 of 38 , Oct 26, 2005
      -- Larry wrote:
      So, yes, user interface design is not easy, and really good user
      interface design requires genuine talent that not everyone has and
      special skills that only a minority are likely to acquire. In this I am
      in agreement with Alan Cooper and my friend Helmut Windl. On the other
      hand, there is too much work to be done to depend on third-degree
      wizards like you and Alan and Helmut. Thus, for one client I am training
      all of the developers in usage-centered design, so that a design
      perspective informs all their work. In reviewing their design exercises
      after a week of training I would say that many of them were not all that
      good, but they were a darn sight better than they were a week earlier
      and probably good enough to give the project the competitive edge it
      needed. Would I rather see them led by an elite team of senior
      interaction designers? Probably. But that was not in the cards. In fact,
      the manager had been burned in the past when design responsibility had
      been too tightly concentrated and separated from development.
      ----

      -- Alain adds:
      Even when the project can afford an elite team of senior interaction
      designers to lead the development, I think it pays off tremendously to
      have developers (in fact everyone on the team) have some basic skill in
      interaction design.

      One of the great things about XP is the concept of collective ownership,
      which in turn implies collective responsibility. In other words, testing
      and defect removal is the responsibility of everyone, not just some
      elite team of senior testing people. Design is the responsibility of
      everyone, not just some elite team of software architects. And
      similarly, usability is the responsibility of everyone, not just some
      elite team of UI designers. To take a page from the OpenSource book:
      "Given a sufficiently large number of eyeballs, every bug/usability
      issue/design flaw is trivial."

      I think it's a good idea to have a specialist on the team whose primary
      job is testing/design/usability if you can afford it (not all projects
      and organisations can afford all three... Many projects are 2-3 people
      teams). But even if you have such an expert, everyone on the team should
      be concerned with and be minimally competent in those disciplines.
      ----
    • Ash Donaldson
      ... Entourage is Microsoft¹s excuse for not porting their Outlook behemoth (who would want that job) to the Mac. It looks and feels like something alien to
      Message 38 of 38 , Oct 30, 2005
        Re: [agile-usability] was norman, now teensy fonts On 30/10/05 2:26 AM, "Jon Kern" <jonkern@...> wrote:
        Entourage?
        Now that's a bizarre product name... Does it organize your posse and groupies, let everyone know your schedule  so they can follow you around?

        Entourage is Microsoft’s excuse for not porting their Outlook behemoth (who would want that job) to the Mac.  It looks and feels like something alien to the Mac and does inexplicable things.  If it was meant to organise your posse and groupies, it would probably forget to tell them where you are and make you feel like it was your fault by saying there was some configuration error with your Exchange server.

        Cheers,

        Ash Donaldson
        OZCHI 2005 Conference Chair
        chair@...

        OZCHI 2005
        Citizens Online: Considerations for today & the future
        www.ozchi.org


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