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Google tricked me by making me think it was going to do something stupid

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  • Phlip
    AU: Here s a report from a user in the field. I hit http://maps.google.com to look up driving directions. The resulting map is, of course, very nice. And each
    Message 1 of 5 , Apr 30, 2005
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      AU:

      Here's a report from a user in the field.

      I hit http://maps.google.com to look up driving directions.

      The resulting map is, of course, very nice. And each leg of the
      driving directions has a little clicker. I figure the clicker will
      generate a closup map of that intersection, so I use Open In New
      Window to see one.

      I prefer Open in New Window because I dislike losing a base page.

      However the clicker was JavaScript, so it affected the current page.

      It raised a little callout above the intersection, with a map detail,
      and the option for a satelite photo!

      My familiarity with other web pages, and with Google, and my
      understanding how difficult thick clients are on the web, lead me to
      assume the implementation would be naive. So my advanced experience
      worked against me.

      Does this contrast with the usability principle that advanced users
      are expected to fall into the advanced features?

      --
      Phlip
    • aacockburn
      Thanks for that lead, Phlip ! I went and tried it and it has the real Google trademark fun stuff. I loved dragging the map to pan, especially in the satellite
      Message 2 of 5 , Apr 30, 2005
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        Thanks for that lead, Phlip ! I went and tried it and it has the real
        Google trademark fun stuff. I loved dragging the map to pan,
        especially in the satellite view, and watching it fill in under me
        (even with a slow phone line). But then I couldn't work out how to
        get the place I wanted in the center of the map so that I could zoom
        in on it (I was trying to hit Key West, and kept getting full screens
        of ocean). and there aren't very many tips posted on the screen.

        So finally, just for the sake of argument, I double-clicked somewhere
        in the picture, and it panned the map slowly until that place became
        the center! (so now I know how to center a location).

        OK, so the "center this location" wasn't obvious, but it's there, and
        it's entertainment all by itself to watch the map pan over to the
        spot.

        ... and then type "pizza" in the local-search box and watch the pizza
        restaurant markers pop onto the satellite image (or watch the drive
        route overlay the satellite image).

        I did check the satellite image for my house, but I couldn't tell if
        my dog was in the yard or not ;-)

        --- In agile-usability@yahoogroups.com, Phlip <phlip2005@g...> wrote:
        > AU:
        >
        > Here's a report from a user in the field.
        >
        > I hit http://maps.google.com to look up driving directions.
        >
        > The resulting map is, of course, very nice. And each leg of the
        > driving directions has a little clicker. I figure the clicker will
        > generate a closup map of that intersection, so I use Open In New
        > Window to see one.
        >
        > I prefer Open in New Window because I dislike losing a base page.
        >
        > However the clicker was JavaScript, so it affected the current page.
        >
        > It raised a little callout above the intersection, with a map
        detail,
        > and the option for a satelite photo!
        >
        > My familiarity with other web pages, and with Google, and my
        > understanding how difficult thick clients are on the web, lead me to
        > assume the implementation would be naive. So my advanced experience
        > worked against me.
        >
        > Does this contrast with the usability principle that advanced users
        > are expected to fall into the advanced features?
        >
        > --
        > Phlip
      • Phlip
        ... All the refreshes happen inside an , so they get rid of the danged twitch in the topmost page that we have come to know and love over the last
        Message 3 of 5 , Apr 30, 2005
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          aacockburn wrote:

          > ... and then type "pizza" in the local-search box and watch the pizza
          > restaurant markers pop onto the satellite image (or watch the drive
          > route overlay the satellite image).

          All the refreshes happen inside an <iframe>, so they get rid of the
          danged twitch in the topmost page that we have come to know and love
          over the last decade:

          if (!_nxsl) {document.write('<iframe id="nxsl" onload="_loadnxsl()"
          src="/maps?file=sf"></iframe>');}

          Then notice how the _loadnxsl() thing happens _after_ the iframe has
          loaded its source page and adjusted the geometry. This means
          _loadnxsl() can do its thing quietly and smoothly.

          The Chimp Test passed at Google HQ!

          Now if someone could just do that <iframe> trick for a Wiki test runner... ;-)

          --
          Phlip
        • Jon Kern
          so what do you suppose the business model is/will be for supplying these links to assorted businesses? near my hometown in PA, i tried ice cream, ford,
          Message 4 of 5 , May 1 11:41 AM
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            so what do you suppose the business model is/will be for supplying these links to assorted businesses?
            near my hometown in PA, i tried ice cream, ford, paintball, software development, website development, agile software development, ... pretty impressive

            here is one link i was led to: http://www.parshift.com/Essays/essay005.htm

            kind of an interesting essay (from 1995) on agile concepts!
            -- jon
            
            


            Phlip said the following on 4/30/2005 9:04 PM:
            aacockburn wrote:

            > ... and then type "pizza" in the local-search box and watch the pizza
            > restaurant markers pop onto the satellite image (or watch the drive
            > route overlay the satellite image).

            All the refreshes happen inside an <iframe>, so they get rid of the
            danged twitch in the topmost page that we have come to know and love
            over the last decade:

            if (!_nxsl) {document.write('<iframe id="nxsl" onload="_loadnxsl()"
            src="/maps?file=sf"></iframe>');}

            Then notice how the _loadnxsl() thing happens _after_ the iframe has
            loaded its source page and adjusted the geometry. This means
            _loadnxsl() can do its thing quietly and smoothly.

            The Chimp Test passed at Google HQ!

            Now if someone could just do that <iframe> trick for a Wiki test runner... ;-)

            --
            Phlip
          • Phlip
            ... Raw mindshare. And note there s not a pop-up ad in sight. -- Phlip
            Message 5 of 5 , May 1 12:03 PM
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              Jon Kern wrote:

              > so what do you suppose the business model is/will be for supplying these
              > links to assorted businesses?

              Raw mindshare. And note there's not a pop-up ad in sight.

              --
              Phlip
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