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RE: [SPAM] - [agile-usability] Re: Role of UCD in agile processes - Email found in subject

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  • Baker, Lisa
    ... In the standard MRD/PRD world, I would agree. But are there people doing this in the agile world? It seems in the agile world they re sort of still trying
    Message 1 of 2 , Jan 27, 2005
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      > more usability and design mature
      > organizations usually separate the interaction design and
      > usability/human factors roles (and then pair two+ people on the

      > same team).



      In the standard MRD/PRD world, I would agree. But are there people doing
      this in the agile world? It seems in the agile world they're sort of
      still trying to figure out where HF/usability/interaction design fits
      period...much less having two + people with complementary skill sets
      assigned to a team.


      Lisa



      ________________________________

      From: Ron Vutpakdi [mailto:vutpakdi@...]
      Sent: Wed 1/26/2005 1:53 PM
      To: agile-usability@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [SPAM] - [agile-usability] Re: Role of UCD in agile processes -
      Email found in subject


      --- In agile-usability@yahoogroups.com, Hugh Beyer <beyer@i...> wrote:
      >
      > What got me was realizing that as soon as you become part of an agile
      > customer team, you're really not a usability person at all anymore.
      Your
      > training may well give you a powerful mindset, but your role is to
      be the
      > customer voice.

      Possibly being a little nitpicky here, but I don't agree that a
      "usability person" should have the role of being the "customer's
      voice." The customer and the user aren't the same thing. The
      customer is the fellow buying the system, but the user is the poor
      sucker who has to use it, and the two often aren't the same person.
      The "usability person" has to know about the customer and her
      needs/position/motivation, but the user is the one the "usability
      person" represents.

      Even if the customer and the user are the same person, being the
      "user's voice" is a rather risky proposition. I see usability people
      as user *advocates* who have a deep understanding of the users and
      push for things on their behalf but also know that, in the end, the
      only person who can speak for the user properly is the user himself.
      Thus, the importance of having real users involved in the process if
      possible.

      >And that requires a deep understanding of the user's work
      > practice, of rational design, and also of usability issues.
      Usability folks
      > who walk into this role without realizing this are likely to be
      surprised.

      I believe that most usability folks who are really involved throughout
      the entire process (rather than tacked on at the end), *will* know
      that the need to understand the user's work practice and usability
      issues.

      Whether or not they also need to be good interaction designers depends
      on the person and team make up (more usability and design mature
      organizations usually separate the interaction design and
      usability/human factors roles (and then pair two+ people on the same
      team). Whether or not a "usability person" can be a good interaction
      designer is also in considerable doubt by some very vocal interaction
      designers.

      Ron





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