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4023Re: [agile-usability] Leverage a small UX team?

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  • Adrian Howard
    Feb 1, 2008
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      On 31 Jan 2008, at 09:45, Manish Pillewar wrote:
      [snip]
      > >> 3) We're thinking that the best times to bring in the UX
      > specialists are
      > >> (a) project inception, prior to forming the team, to help guide
      > initial
      > >> user research (ethnography, persona development, etc.) and (b)
      > during
      > >> release planning (or maybe between each sprint), to help the
      > team ID
      > >> what tools from the world of user-centered design will be most
      > helpful
      > >> for the coming work, and how the UX team can support that.
      >
      > This is perfect. You can also choose to involve the designers for
      > POC activities or use their creativity to conceptulize UI solutions
      > during sales pitches or/and do competitive benchmarking exercises
      > as a showcase of Ux capabilities. QA is one more arena where the
      > designer can help in. She can do design reviews or usability
      > evaluations( heuristics,etc), even quick usability testing on the
      > developed screens at every iteration end, to ensure that the UX
      > standards are maintained.

      [snip]

      Not sure that I'd describe it as perfect :-)

      I find that you get a _lot_ more value by having UX folk involved
      with the team as close to 100% as possible. While there is obviously
      a lot "big" UX work that sits on the customer side, communicating it
      is much better done in person than with documents. There are also
      always UX issues that pop up during development. Having a UX person
      on-hand makes sure that they'll be addressed in an appropriate manner.

      So my perfect set up has at least one UX person as a member of the
      team 100% of the time.

      Which of course sucks as a solution if, like the OP, you only fewer
      UX folk than development teams...

      Assuming that hiring a bunch more UX dudes isn't practical, I'd be
      looking at spending a lot more time in general education of the whole
      team in UX issues. That way there's more chance that UX issues that
      pop up mid-iteration are handled well (even/especially when the
      method is "get a UX dude here stat" :-)

      Cheers,

      Adrian
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