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Help with Pulse coil

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  • magnetman12003
    I am in the final stages of making an Adams motor. I wish to constuct a 12 to 24 DC pulse coil that will be powerfull and efficient repelling a 7/16 inch
    Message 1 of 3 , Oct 13, 2005
      I am in the final stages of making an Adams motor.

      I wish to constuct a 12 to 24 DC pulse coil that will be powerfull and
      efficient repelling a 7/16 inch (diameter) neodymium rod magnet.

      Can anyone give me advice as how to construct this coil. My power
      supply is a regulated 12 volts DC and puts out 2.5 amps. I plan to use
      24 volts DC later so the coil should be able to handle that also. Any
      and all advice is most welcome. Thanks, Tom
    • Russel Prier
      Hi Tom, I certainly don t have all the answers but a bit more info might help. What is the core you are using for your coil? Is it pure iron or some less
      Message 2 of 3 , Oct 13, 2005

        Hi Tom,

        I certainly don’t have all the answers but a bit more info might help.  What is the core you are using for your coil?  Is it pure iron or some less effective material?  If it is pure iron it will need to be equal in diameter to the magnet and if it is just soft iron wire or lamination plate it will need to be bigger in cross section than the magnets to avoid magnetic saturation which will make your motor generator run very slow and not show OU effects.  I have not got a formula for the size of wire or number of turns but would suggest 26 gauge SWG wire with a 10 ohm resistance.  So you can work out how many meters of wire you will need like for 26 gauge you need 74.6 meters of wire to get 10 ohms.  Your voltage is probably too low for neos magnets and you will go far better at low voltages with ferrite magnets and use neos for higher voltages like 48 volts upwards.  You may need to build 2 or 3 coils to get a good result unless someone can give you very accurate information.  All the best as we are all just learning this stuff.

        Regard Russel P.

      • TOM FERKO
        Hi Russel, Thanks for the info. My magnets are 7/16 inch in diameter. So I will experiment using iron or grade 1010 soft steel 7/16 inch diameter rods and
        Message 3 of 3 , Oct 14, 2005
          Hi Russel,
           
          Thanks for the info. My magnets are 7/16 inch in diameter. So I will experiment using iron or grade 1010 soft steel 7/16 inch diameter rods and bolts as a core. I am using a steel bolt presently for the coil core.    It looks like 244 feet 9 inches of 26 gauge wire will bring a 10 ohm resistance.  I will have to get a variable voltage power supply somewhere capable of an output more than 12 volts.    Let you know what happens.         Tom
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Thursday, October 13, 2005 2:51 PM
          Subject: RE: [adamsmotor] Help with Pulse coil

          Hi Tom,

          I certainly don¬ít have all the answers but a bit more info might help.  What is the core you are using for your coil?  Is it pure iron or some less effective material?  If it is pure iron it will need to be equal in diameter to the magnet and if it is just soft iron wire or lamination plate it will need to be bigger in cross section than the magnets to avoid magnetic saturation which will make your motor generator run very slow and not show OU effects.  I have not got a formula for the size of wire or number of turns but would suggest 26 gauge SWG wire with a 10 ohm resistance.  So you can work out how many meters of wire you will need like for 26 gauge you need 74.6 meters of wire to get 10 ohms.  Your voltage is probably too low for neos magnets and you will go far better at low voltages with ferrite magnets and use neos for higher voltages like 48 volts upwards.  You may need to build 2 or 3 coils to get a good result unless someone can give you very accurate information.  All the best as we are all just learning this stuff.

          Regard Russel P.

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