Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [Acoustic Guitarist Guild] New player...

Expand Messages
  • Meg & Peter Broome
    Shape is to do with it; and construction. The Classical guitar is curved around the shell right up to the neck, whereas folk guitars have a flat section
    Message 1 of 12 , Sep 30, 2004
    View Source
    • 0 Attachment
      Shape is to do with it; and construction.

      The Classical guitar is curved around the shell right up to the neck,
      whereas folk guitars have a flat section leading to the neck (hence
      sometimes called "flat tops"). Classical are built (as has been said) for
      nylon strings (including the bottom three = nylon with wire wound around
      them), whereas folk are built for steel strings.

      As has been said, the neck is narrower on folk guitars, and slightly
      curved(which hasn't), to make barre chords easier to hold (the first finger
      will naturally form a curve more easily than a dead straight, with pressure
      applied); the wider neck makes fingering individual strings, for melody and
      chords easier, and it's easier for a beginner to differentiate when learning
      the chord shapes (less buzzed strings where the finger touches the next
      string to the one desired).

      If classical is your thing then swap for a classical guitar. Otherwise it
      would be like trying to play Mozart's horn concerto on a saxophone.

      HTH

      PeterB
    • Lance Kragenbrink
      A little Interjection if I may.. A flat top is called a flat top not because of the shape or outline of the body (shell) or the area where the neck joins,
      Message 2 of 12 , Oct 1, 2004
      View Source
      • 0 Attachment
        A little Interjection if I may..

        A "flat top" is called a flat top not because of the shape or outline of
        the body (shell) or the area where the neck joins, but rather because of
        the top being flat, hence the term "flat top".
        Flat top guitars were literally flat on top, back when gut strings were
        the norm. Steel strings apply more tension, or pull to the top of a
        guitar, so there had to be change's made to strengthen the top of a
        (flat top). Now and for most of the last century guitar builders of
        (flat top) guitars put a dome in the top. I use a 30 foot radius dome on
        my guitars, this dome creates a stronger top, more resistant to the
        constant pull of the higher tension steel strings.
        The typical fretboard for a steel string guitar is 1 11/16 wide at the
        nut, for fingerstyle players the nut width is typical 1 3/4's wide. This
        allows more freedom and space between strings. The string to string
        spacing at the saddle is also adjusted for the style of player.
        Typically 2 1/8th is the norm, fingerstyle guitarists prefer 2 1/4.
        The most typical radius of a steel string fretboard is 16". Were as a
        Classical guitar has little or no fretboard radius.
        Classical guitars sport a true flattop and a much lighter bracing
        design. The nylon strings do not put nearly as much pull on the top.
        They also do not generate as much energy when plucked, there for, a
        lighter bracing system is needed in order to get an acceptable sound.
        Steel string guitars or (flat top's) for the purpose of this discussion,
        employ an X brace bracing system. The X intersects about 1.5 inches
        above the bridge, between the bridge and sound hole. This bracing system
        is much better suited to with stand the pull of steel strings.



        Just my 2 cents, not trying to ruffle any feathers :-)



        Best
        Lance Kragenbrink
        www.kragenbrinkguitars.com

        -----Original Message-----
        From: Meg & Peter Broome [mailto:guitar@...]
        Sent: Thursday, September 30, 2004 3:19 PM
        To: acousticguitaristguild@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [Acoustic Guitarist Guild] New player...


        Shape is to do with it; and construction.

        The Classical guitar is curved around the shell right up to the neck,
        whereas folk guitars have a flat section leading to the neck (hence
        sometimes called "flat tops"). Classical are built (as has been said)
        for nylon strings (including the bottom three = nylon with wire wound
        around them), whereas folk are built for steel strings.

        As has been said, the neck is narrower on folk guitars, and slightly
        curved(which hasn't), to make barre chords easier to hold (the first
        finger will naturally form a curve more easily than a dead straight,
        with pressure applied); the wider neck makes fingering individual
        strings, for melody and chords easier, and it's easier for a beginner to
        differentiate when learning the chord shapes (less buzzed strings where
        the finger touches the next string to the one desired).

        If classical is your thing then swap for a classical guitar. Otherwise
        it would be like trying to play Mozart's horn concerto on a saxophone.

        HTH

        PeterB






        Yahoo! Groups Links
      • Vince Pawless
        no ruffling of feathers on this end. You re correct in my book! My flattops have a radiused dome also. I think also a side advantage of this... is the
        Message 3 of 12 , Oct 1, 2004
        View Source
        • 0 Attachment
          no ruffling of feathers on this end. You're correct in my book! My
          "flattops" have a radiused dome also. I think also a "side advantage"
          of this... is the guitar top is stronger, (not that the owner INTENDS to
          do this), in the event of pressure being put on the top by "incidental"
          weight or pressure from traveling and handling. It keeps the tendency
          of the top being pushed inward therefore avoiding damage.

          vp


          www.pawless.com


          -----Original Message-----
          From: Lance Kragenbrink [mailto:lance@...]
          Sent: Friday, October 01, 2004 7:05 AM
          To: acousticguitaristguild@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: RE: [Acoustic Guitarist Guild] New player...


          A little Interjection if I may..

          A "flat top" is called a flat top not because of the shape or outline of
          the body (shell) or the area where the neck joins, but rather because of
          the top being flat, hence the term "flat top".
          Flat top guitars were literally flat on top, back when gut strings were
          the norm. Steel strings apply more tension, or pull to the top of a
          guitar, so there had to be change's made to strengthen the top of a
          (flat top). Now and for most of the last century guitar builders of
          (flat top) guitars put a dome in the top. I use a 30 foot radius dome on
          my guitars, this dome creates a stronger top, more resistant to the
          constant pull of the higher tension steel strings. The typical fretboard
          for a steel string guitar is 1 11/16 wide at the nut, for fingerstyle
          players the nut width is typical 1 3/4's wide. This allows more freedom
          and space between strings. The string to string spacing at the saddle is
          also adjusted for the style of player. Typically 2 1/8th is the norm,
          fingerstyle guitarists prefer 2 1/4. The most typical radius of a steel
          string fretboard is 16". Were as a Classical guitar has little or no
          fretboard radius. Classical guitars sport a true flattop and a much
          lighter bracing design. The nylon strings do not put nearly as much pull
          on the top. They also do not generate as much energy when plucked, there
          for, a lighter bracing system is needed in order to get an acceptable
          sound. Steel string guitars or (flat top's) for the purpose of this
          discussion, employ an X brace bracing system. The X intersects about 1.5
          inches above the bridge, between the bridge and sound hole. This bracing
          system is much better suited to with stand the pull of steel strings.



          Just my 2 cents, not trying to ruffle any feathers :-)



          Best
          Lance Kragenbrink
          www.kragenbrinkguitars.com

          -----Original Message-----
          From: Meg & Peter Broome [mailto:guitar@...]
          Sent: Thursday, September 30, 2004 3:19 PM
          To: acousticguitaristguild@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [Acoustic Guitarist Guild] New player...


          Shape is to do with it; and construction.

          The Classical guitar is curved around the shell right up to the neck,
          whereas folk guitars have a flat section leading to the neck (hence
          sometimes called "flat tops"). Classical are built (as has been said)
          for nylon strings (including the bottom three = nylon with wire wound
          around them), whereas folk are built for steel strings.

          As has been said, the neck is narrower on folk guitars, and slightly
          curved(which hasn't), to make barre chords easier to hold (the first
          finger will naturally form a curve more easily than a dead straight,
          with pressure applied); the wider neck makes fingering individual
          strings, for melody and chords easier, and it's easier for a beginner to
          differentiate when learning the chord shapes (less buzzed strings where
          the finger touches the next string to the one desired).

          If classical is your thing then swap for a classical guitar. Otherwise
          it would be like trying to play Mozart's horn concerto on a saxophone.

          HTH

          PeterB






          Yahoo! Groups Links












          Yahoo! Groups Links
        • Meg & Peter Broome
          Thanks for the clarification Laurence - I was obviously misinformed. However, my comment did allow us to read your excellent description, so we re all wiser
          Message 4 of 12 , Oct 2, 2004
          View Source
          • 0 Attachment
            Thanks for the clarification Laurence - I was obviously misinformed.
            However, my comment did allow us to read your excellent description, so
            we're all wiser now - Thanks !

            ps: I have ruffleless feathers !

            Best regards,
            PeterB
            mail is usually read at about 07.00 British time
          • Lance Kragenbrink
            Thanks Stan.. Just trying to help :-) ... From: stan thomison [mailto:rondathomison@sbcglobal.net] Sent: Monday, November 01, 2004 10:03 AM To:
            Message 5 of 12 , Oct 2, 2004
            View Source
            • 0 Attachment
              Thanks Stan.. Just trying to help :-)

              -----Original Message-----
              From: stan thomison [mailto:rondathomison@...]
              Sent: Monday, November 01, 2004 10:03 AM
              To: acousticguitaristguild@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: [Acoustic Guitarist Guild] New player...


              Hey Lance
              Great explanation. Stan Thomison see you at olf
              ----- Original Message -----
              From: Lance Kragenbrink
              To: acousticguitaristguild@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Friday, October 01, 2004 6:04 AM
              Subject: RE: [Acoustic Guitarist Guild] New player...


              A little Interjection if I may..

              A "flat top" is called a flat top not because of the shape or outline
              of
              the body (shell) or the area where the neck joins, but rather because
              of
              the top being flat, hence the term "flat top".
              Flat top guitars were literally flat on top, back when gut strings
              were
              the norm. Steel strings apply more tension, or pull to the top of a
              guitar, so there had to be change's made to strengthen the top of a
              (flat top). Now and for most of the last century guitar builders of
              (flat top) guitars put a dome in the top. I use a 30 foot radius dome
              on
              my guitars, this dome creates a stronger top, more resistant to the
              constant pull of the higher tension steel strings.
              The typical fretboard for a steel string guitar is 1 11/16 wide at the
              nut, for fingerstyle players the nut width is typical 1 3/4's wide.
              This
              allows more freedom and space between strings. The string to string
              spacing at the saddle is also adjusted for the style of player.
              Typically 2 1/8th is the norm, fingerstyle guitarists prefer 2 1/4.
              The most typical radius of a steel string fretboard is 16". Were as a
              Classical guitar has little or no fretboard radius.
              Classical guitars sport a true flattop and a much lighter bracing
              design. The nylon strings do not put nearly as much pull on the top.
              They also do not generate as much energy when plucked, there for, a
              lighter bracing system is needed in order to get an acceptable sound.
              Steel string guitars or (flat top's) for the purpose of this
              discussion,
              employ an X brace bracing system. The X intersects about 1.5 inches
              above the bridge, between the bridge and sound hole. This bracing
              system
              is much better suited to with stand the pull of steel strings.



              Just my 2 cents, not trying to ruffle any feathers :-)



              Best
              Lance Kragenbrink
              www.kragenbrinkguitars.com

              -----Original Message-----
              From: Meg & Peter Broome [mailto:guitar@...]
              Sent: Thursday, September 30, 2004 3:19 PM
              To: acousticguitaristguild@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: [Acoustic Guitarist Guild] New player...


              Shape is to do with it; and construction.

              The Classical guitar is curved around the shell right up to the neck,
              whereas folk guitars have a flat section leading to the neck (hence
              sometimes called "flat tops"). Classical are built (as has been said)
              for nylon strings (including the bottom three = nylon with wire wound
              around them), whereas folk are built for steel strings.

              As has been said, the neck is narrower on folk guitars, and slightly
              curved(which hasn't), to make barre chords easier to hold (the first
              finger will naturally form a curve more easily than a dead straight,
              with pressure applied); the wider neck makes fingering individual
              strings, for melody and chords easier, and it's easier for a beginner
              to
              differentiate when learning the chord shapes (less buzzed strings
              where
              the finger touches the next string to the one desired).

              If classical is your thing then swap for a classical guitar.
              Otherwise
              it would be like trying to play Mozart's horn concerto on a saxophone.

              HTH

              PeterB






              Yahoo! Groups Links









              Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
              ADVERTISEMENT





              ------------------------------------------------------------------------
              ------
              Yahoo! Groups Links

              a.. To visit your group on the web, go to:
              http://groups.yahoo.com/group/acousticguitaristguild/

              b.. To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
              acousticguitaristguild-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

              c.. Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
              Service.



              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





              Yahoo! Groups Links
            • stan thomison
              Hey Lance Great explanation. Stan Thomison see you at olf ... From: Lance Kragenbrink To: acousticguitaristguild@yahoogroups.com Sent: Friday, October 01, 2004
              Message 6 of 12 , Nov 1, 2004
              View Source
              • 0 Attachment
                Hey Lance
                Great explanation. Stan Thomison see you at olf
                ----- Original Message -----
                From: Lance Kragenbrink
                To: acousticguitaristguild@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Friday, October 01, 2004 6:04 AM
                Subject: RE: [Acoustic Guitarist Guild] New player...


                A little Interjection if I may..

                A "flat top" is called a flat top not because of the shape or outline of
                the body (shell) or the area where the neck joins, but rather because of
                the top being flat, hence the term "flat top".
                Flat top guitars were literally flat on top, back when gut strings were
                the norm. Steel strings apply more tension, or pull to the top of a
                guitar, so there had to be change's made to strengthen the top of a
                (flat top). Now and for most of the last century guitar builders of
                (flat top) guitars put a dome in the top. I use a 30 foot radius dome on
                my guitars, this dome creates a stronger top, more resistant to the
                constant pull of the higher tension steel strings.
                The typical fretboard for a steel string guitar is 1 11/16 wide at the
                nut, for fingerstyle players the nut width is typical 1 3/4's wide. This
                allows more freedom and space between strings. The string to string
                spacing at the saddle is also adjusted for the style of player.
                Typically 2 1/8th is the norm, fingerstyle guitarists prefer 2 1/4.
                The most typical radius of a steel string fretboard is 16". Were as a
                Classical guitar has little or no fretboard radius.
                Classical guitars sport a true flattop and a much lighter bracing
                design. The nylon strings do not put nearly as much pull on the top.
                They also do not generate as much energy when plucked, there for, a
                lighter bracing system is needed in order to get an acceptable sound.
                Steel string guitars or (flat top's) for the purpose of this discussion,
                employ an X brace bracing system. The X intersects about 1.5 inches
                above the bridge, between the bridge and sound hole. This bracing system
                is much better suited to with stand the pull of steel strings.



                Just my 2 cents, not trying to ruffle any feathers :-)



                Best
                Lance Kragenbrink
                www.kragenbrinkguitars.com

                -----Original Message-----
                From: Meg & Peter Broome [mailto:guitar@...]
                Sent: Thursday, September 30, 2004 3:19 PM
                To: acousticguitaristguild@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: Re: [Acoustic Guitarist Guild] New player...


                Shape is to do with it; and construction.

                The Classical guitar is curved around the shell right up to the neck,
                whereas folk guitars have a flat section leading to the neck (hence
                sometimes called "flat tops"). Classical are built (as has been said)
                for nylon strings (including the bottom three = nylon with wire wound
                around them), whereas folk are built for steel strings.

                As has been said, the neck is narrower on folk guitars, and slightly
                curved(which hasn't), to make barre chords easier to hold (the first
                finger will naturally form a curve more easily than a dead straight,
                with pressure applied); the wider neck makes fingering individual
                strings, for melody and chords easier, and it's easier for a beginner to
                differentiate when learning the chord shapes (less buzzed strings where
                the finger touches the next string to the one desired).

                If classical is your thing then swap for a classical guitar. Otherwise
                it would be like trying to play Mozart's horn concerto on a saxophone.

                HTH

                PeterB






                Yahoo! Groups Links









                Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
                ADVERTISEMENT





                ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                Yahoo! Groups Links

                a.. To visit your group on the web, go to:
                http://groups.yahoo.com/group/acousticguitaristguild/

                b.. To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                acousticguitaristguild-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

                c.. Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.



                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.