Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Anointing Oil & Kaneh Bosem

Expand Messages
  • Aaron
    ... I am a devotee of this final interpretation. It just makes sense, as this oil was intended for the Priests to use when establishing communication with
    Message 1 of 11 , Jun 16, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      --- In abramelin@yahoogroups.com, Khem Caigan <Khem@...> wrote:

      > See the entry "Exodus ยป Chapter 30", from
      > 'Navigating the BIBLE', on on bible.ort.org:
      >
      > fragrant cane
      >
      > Keneh bosem in Hebrew. Ancient sources identify this with
      > the sweet calamus (Septuagint; Rambam on Kerithoth 1:1;
      > Saadia; Ibn Janach). This is the sweetflag or flag-root,
      > Acoras calamus which grows in Europe.
      >
      > It appears that a similar species grew in the Holy Land,
      > in the Hula region in ancient times (Theophrastus, History
      > of Plants 9:7). Other sources apparently indicate that
      > it was the Indian plant, Cympopogan martini, which has
      > the form of red straw (Yad, Kley HaMikdash 1:3).
      >
      > On the basis of cognate pronunciation and Septuagint
      > readings, some identify Keneh bosem with the English
      > and Greek *cannabis*, the hemp plant.

      I am a devotee of this final interpretation. It just makes sense, as
      this oil was intended for the Priests to use when establishing
      communication with Yahweh. To use a psycho-active oil is basic
      shamanic technique.

      One of my favorite authors on this subject is Chris Bennett:

      http://forbiddenfruitpublishing.com/chris/

      And you can read his take on "Cannabis in the Old Testament" here:

      http://www.cannabisculture.com/backissues/cc05/kanehb.html

      LVX
      Aaron
    • Khem Caigan
      ... Hi, Tony ~ The article that you cite overlooks the fact that Calamus is itself a mistranslation of the Torah s *Kaneh Bosem*. Calamus is a dead end, no
      Message 2 of 11 , Feb 19, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
        Tony doth schreibble:
        >
        > For quite a number of years I've been following Crowley's instructions
        > for making Abramelin oil.
        >
        > I came across the following interesting article which emphatically
        > states that calamus should be used in place of galangal:
        >
        > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abramelin_oil
        >
        > The reason is that the Mathers translation derives from an incomplete
        > French manuscript copy of the book. Earlier versions apparently use
        > calamus. I suppose we'll all find out in August.
        >
        > The article also suggests alternate methods of making the oil.
        >
        > Any thoughts?

        Hi, Tony ~


        The article that you cite overlooks the fact that Calamus
        is itself a mistranslation of the Torah's *Kaneh Bosem*.

        Calamus is a dead end, no matter whether you are employing
        it as a scent or for the asarone content.

        Galangal is found throughout Europe and the Middle East
        as a matter in perfumes and as a spice in cooking - and
        Calamus is not.

        And neither Calamus nor Galangal are anywhere employed as
        perfume AND spice AND textile, and *Kaneh Bosem* is.

        Cors in Manu Domine,


        ~ Khem Caigan
        <Khem@...>

        ' Oft on the Mouldering Keep by Night

        Earl Roger takes his Stand,

        With the Sword that Shone at Hastings' fight,

        Firm Grasped in his Red, Right Hand ! '
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.