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Charlie

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  • ando maya
    Dear AAPN member, The below issue in San Francisco in the U.S. is about animal rights and animal caregivers rights. This is not happened in Asia, but I just
    Message 1 of 4 , Jan 14, 2013
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      Dear AAPN member,
      The below issue in San Francisco in the U.S. is about animal rights and animal caregivers' rights. This is not happened in Asia, but I just want to raise voice out that even developed country like the U.S., legal system and human egos bullying innocent people and animals. Now it is a good time for us to think if legal system is fairly protecting animals rights.
      Someone has invited me to sign petition for a dog called Charlie who has been captured at Animal Control Centre in San Francisco in August last year for freedom. The young dog has been in a small cage over many months without owner's visits and exercise after he was captured by ACC due to claimed aggressions of Charlie at a police horse at an off-leash area for dog when a police officer was riding horse entering the play field. Charlie was surprised by sudden appearance of horse and barked and bite that horse. This was made animal instinct of " fight or flight". If you can support, please voice and be a part of supporter for help Charlie and his owner David. I am sure voices from animal rescue groups in Asia could give some useful advice for supporters. http://www.facebook.com/HelpSaveCharlie?ref=stream
      http://www.examiner.com/article/charlie-the-pit-bull-has-been-granted-life-saving-reprieve
      http://www.causes.com/causes/790698-help-save-charlie/actions/1723977

      Thank you very much for your attention.
      Thanks again for posting non-Asia issue.
      Regards,
      Maya in Hong Kong
    • Merritt Clifton
      Ando Maya s account of the Charlie incident in San Francisco is grossly misinformed. Far from being surprised by sudden appearance of the horse he
      Message 2 of 4 , Jan 14, 2013
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        Ando Maya's account of the "Charlie" incident in San Francisco is grossly misinformed.

        Far from being "surprised by sudden appearance of the horse" he attacked, the pit bull "Charlie" ran more than 100 meters across an open field to launch his attack, began by leaping up and biting the police officer who was on the horse, then pulled the horse and rider down, knocking the police officer unconscious, chased the horse for approximately one mile, and attacked the horse multiple times thereafter, all in front of many uninvolved witnesses.

        The San Francisco Police Department statement is below. The map of the incident posted at the police web site is even more informative.

        As I come originally from the San Francisco Bay area, I am familiar with the geography, and guarantee that any dog who ran that far, to inflict thirteen bites on a running horse, was hellbent on doing harm, and would not be safe around any other human or animal.

        --Merritt Clifton, editor, ANIMAL PEOPLE.

        ----------------------------------------------------------------------------

        http://sf-police.org/index.aspx?recordid=585&page=3763
        Department News and Updates

        SFPD Statement on Decision in Vicious & Dangerous Dog Investigation
        12-158
        Posted Date:
        12/13/2012
        Following the August 6, 2012 attack of a United States Park Police Department mounted officer and his horse by a dog near Crissy Field in the Presidio, the San Francisco Police Department s Vicious and Dangerous Animal Unit conducted a hearing. During that hearing, evidence was presented by both the US Park Police, which had completed a comprehensive investigation of the incident and by the owner of the dog.

        In this case, a US Park Police Officer was patrolling an area of the Park that is open to off leash, voice control exercise of dogs. This area is not a fenced in dog run or dog park as has been alluded to in other accounts. Dog owners using this area are required to maintain control of their pets.

        While passing through this area, a dog identified as an American Staffordshire Terrier saw the Park Police mounted team and ran towards them, covering approximately 200 feet. Upon reaching the equestrian team, the dog leapt up and bit the officer on his leg. The officer ordered the dog owner to take control of his dog. The owner failed to do so allowing the dog to attack the horse, biting him on the abdomen, then locking on the horse s leg. The horse fell and threw the officer who landed on the ground and was knocked unconscious. The horse ran from the scene with the dog in pursuit. The investigation determined that the horse ran (approximately one mile) back to its stable, a place of safety. Unfortunately, the stable doors were closed and the pursuing dog attacked the horse a second time, inflicting additional injuries. The horse ran to the rear of the stable where the dog attacked for a third time. Escaping this attack, the desperate horse ran in a westerly direction (another one-half mile) to the area of Armistead Road and Ramsel Court with the dog still on attack. A Park Police Motorcycle Officer caught up to the pair and intervened ending any further attack.

        The fleeing horse covered approximately one and a half miles in its efforts to get away from the pursuing dog. As a result of this attack, the horse was bitten thirteen times, sustaining serious bite wounds to its legs, hind quarters, chest and abdominal areas. As a result, the horse was stabled for over twenty days and has returned to limited service. The Officer s riding boot prevented injury from the dog s bite, but he did sustain a serious injury when he was thrown from the horse. The officer has since returned to duty.
        In coming to a decision in this investigation, the Police Department s Vicious and Dangerous Animals Unit took into consideration the circumstances of the case, the willingness and ability of the dog s owner to take responsibility for the animal and the health, safety and welfare of the community.

        It was determined that the dog exhibited human directed aggression and an extremely high degree of prey drive demonstrated by its extensive pursuit and multiple attacks on the horse. The suggestion that the attacking dog was reacting out of fear is inappropriate as the location of the horse s wounds were not consistent with injuries that would be caused by a fearful dog, which typically bite at hooves and ankles. The pursuit and bites to the horse s torso are indicative of a desire to seriously injure or kill. Weighing the evidence presented at the hearing, the hearing officer made the difficult decision that the dog was a vicious and dangerous animal and had no alternative but to order the animal be euthanized.

        The Vicious and Dangerous Animals Unit does not take such decisions lightly and makes every effort to find remedies to keep animals with their owners. In the vast majority of dog bite cases, accommodations are made allowing the dog to remain with the owner, with certain restrictions. Unfortunately, there are cases in which an animal is deemed dangerous and the safety and welfare of the community dictates that the animal be euthanized. The Unit receives, on average, 450 dog bite reports per year. Of those cases, the Unit holds approximately 120 vicious and dangerous dog hearings where sadly five percent of those hearings result in an order to euthanize. In some of those cases, the owners come to the same conclusion and voluntarily have the animal put down.
        --
        _____________________________

        Merritt Clifton
        Editor, ANIMAL PEOPLE
        P.O. Box 960
        Clinton, WA 98236

        Telephone: 360-579-2505
        Cell: 360-969-0450
        Fax: 360-579-2575
        E-mail: anmlpepl@...
        Web: www.animalpeoplenews.org

        [Your donations help to support ANIMAL PEOPLE, providing original investigative coverage of animal protection worldwide since 1992. Our global readership includes the decision-makers at more than 7,000 animal protection organizations. We have no alignment or affiliation with any other entity. Free online; $24/year by post; for free sample, please send postal address. Our annual Watchdog Report on Animal Charities, evaluating 174 of the most prominent animal charities in the U.S. and abroad, is $25.]
      • ando maya
        Hi Merritt, The fact was perhaps inaccurately reported, but please follow all events in the past and unfairness of judgement for this case. I did not see it
        Message 3 of 4 , Jan 14, 2013
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          Hi Merritt,
          The fact was perhaps inaccurately reported, but please follow all events in the past and unfairness of judgement for this case. I did not see it with my eyes, but government covering up the facts in order to not let others to view in their report with black inks are certainly not right. Why police run into off leash area? What is their purpose? It is good to cite a bias, but I certainly emphasize that psychological torture to animals who do not understand reasons is equal to cruelty. If the need to detain animals, ACC should open what kind of condition captured animals are in. Even offenders who are locked in prison, there are at least standard level of life by having visitors, exercising, etc...

          "surprised by sudden appearance of the horse" he attacked, the pit bull "Charlie" ran more than 100 meters across an open field to launch his attack, began by leaping up and biting the police officer who was on the horse, then pulled the horse and rider down, knocking the police officer unconscious, chased the horse for approximately one mile, and attacked the horse multiple times thereafter, all in front of many uninvolved witnesses.
          It is also better to verify the sources where it came from. There are always bias between facts and reported incidents, but at least, blind hold to dogs in small cage for month and month is not right. I know you are speaking out your opinion based on your experiences, unless Psychopath or Sociopath, human is treatable. So if dog is once attacked instinctively without any control, does it mean that the dog is killed??? I do not think so. You and I have different opinion and that is all. Justice for fairness, that is what I wanted to say and not for debating. Thanks, Maya

          To: aapn@yahoogroups.com
          From: anmlpepl@...
          Date: Mon, 14 Jan 2013 22:24:20 -0800
          Subject: Re: [aapn] Charlie


























          Ando Maya's account of the "Charlie" incident in San Francisco is grossly misinformed.



          Far from being "surprised by sudden appearance of the horse" he attacked, the pit bull "Charlie" ran more than 100 meters across an open field to launch his attack, began by leaping up and biting the police officer who was on the horse, then pulled the horse and rider down, knocking the police officer unconscious, chased the horse for approximately one mile, and attacked the horse multiple times thereafter, all in front of many uninvolved witnesses.



          The San Francisco Police Department statement is below. The map of the incident posted at the police web site is even more informative.



          As I come originally from the San Francisco Bay area, I am familiar with the geography, and guarantee that any dog who ran that far, to inflict thirteen bites on a running horse, was hellbent on doing harm, and would not be safe around any other human or animal.



          --Merritt Clifton, editor, ANIMAL PEOPLE.



          ----------------------------------------------------------



          http://sf-police.org/index.aspx?recordid=585&page=3763

          Department News and Updates



          SFPD Statement on Decision in Vicious & Dangerous Dog Investigation

          12-158

          Posted Date:

          12/13/2012

          Following the August 6, 2012 attack of a United States Park Police Department mounted officer and his horse by a dog near Crissy Field in the Presidio, the San Francisco Police Department s Vicious and Dangerous Animal Unit conducted a hearing. During that hearing, evidence was presented by both the US Park Police, which had completed a comprehensive investigation of the incident and by the owner of the dog.



          In this case, a US Park Police Officer was patrolling an area of the Park that is open to off leash, voice control exercise of dogs. This area is not a fenced in dog run or dog park as has been alluded to in other accounts. Dog owners using this area are required to maintain control of their pets.



          While passing through this area, a dog identified as an American Staffordshire Terrier saw the Park Police mounted team and ran towards them, covering approximately 200 feet. Upon reaching the equestrian team, the dog leapt up and bit the officer on his leg. The officer ordered the dog owner to take control of his dog. The owner failed to do so allowing the dog to attack the horse, biting him on the abdomen, then locking on the horse s leg. The horse fell and threw the officer who landed on the ground and was knocked unconscious. The horse ran from the scene with the dog in pursuit. The investigation determined that the horse ran (approximately one mile) back to its stable, a place of safety. Unfortunately, the stable doors were closed and the pursuing dog attacked the horse a second time, inflicting additional injuries. The horse ran to the rear of the stable where the dog attacked for a third time. Escaping this attack, the desperate horse ran in a westerly direction (another one-half mile) to the area of Armistead Road and Ramsel Court with the dog still on attack. A Park Police Motorcycle Officer caught up to the pair and intervened ending any further attack.



          The fleeing horse covered approximately one and a half miles in its efforts to get away from the pursuing dog. As a result of this attack, the horse was bitten thirteen times, sustaining serious bite wounds to its legs, hind quarters, chest and abdominal areas. As a result, the horse was stabled for over twenty days and has returned to limited service. The Officer s riding boot prevented injury from the dog s bite, but he did sustain a serious injury when he was thrown from the horse. The officer has since returned to duty.

          In coming to a decision in this investigation, the Police Department s Vicious and Dangerous Animals Unit took into consideration the circumstances of the case, the willingness and ability of the dog s owner to take responsibility for the animal and the health, safety and welfare of the community.



          It was determined that the dog exhibited human directed aggression and an extremely high degree of prey drive demonstrated by its extensive pursuit and multiple attacks on the horse. The suggestion that the attacking dog was reacting out of fear is inappropriate as the location of the horse s wounds were not consistent with injuries that would be caused by a fearful dog, which typically bite at hooves and ankles. The pursuit and bites to the horse s torso are indicative of a desire to seriously injure or kill. Weighing the evidence presented at the hearing, the hearing officer made the difficult decision that the dog was a vicious and dangerous animal and had no alternative but to order the animal be euthanized.



          The Vicious and Dangerous Animals Unit does not take such decisions lightly and makes every effort to find remedies to keep animals with their owners. In the vast majority of dog bite cases, accommodations are made allowing the dog to remain with the owner, with certain restrictions. Unfortunately, there are cases in which an animal is deemed dangerous and the safety and welfare of the community dictates that the animal be euthanized. The Unit receives, on average, 450 dog bite reports per year. Of those cases, the Unit holds approximately 120 vicious and dangerous dog hearings where sadly five percent of those hearings result in an order to euthanize. In some of those cases, the owners come to the same conclusion and voluntarily have the animal put down.

          --

          _____________________________



          Merritt Clifton

          Editor, ANIMAL PEOPLE

          P.O. Box 960

          Clinton, WA 98236



          Telephone: 360-579-2505

          Cell: 360-969-0450

          Fax: 360-579-2575

          E-mail: anmlpepl@...

          Web: www.animalpeoplenews.org



          [Your donations help to support ANIMAL PEOPLE, providing original investigative coverage of animal protection worldwide since 1992. Our global readership includes the decision-makers at more than 7,000 animal protection organizations. We have no alignment or affiliation with any other entity. Free online; $24/year by post; for free sample, please send postal address. Our annual Watchdog Report on Animal Charities, evaluating 174 of the most prominent animal charities in the U.S. and abroad, is $25.]


















          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Merritt Clifton
          ... Chrissy Field is not an off-leash area. That s the first of the many colossal lies told by the defenders of the pit bull Charlie. Dogs are allowed to be
          Message 4 of 4 , Jan 14, 2013
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            > Why police run into off leash area?

            Chrissy Field is not an off-leash area. That's the first of the many colossal lies told by the defenders of the pit bull "Charlie."

            Dogs are allowed to be off-leash in Chrissy Field if under control of their people. But Chrissy Field is also heavily used by joggers, bicyclists, people playing Frisbee, people playing other ball games and badminton, sunbathers, and small children.

            A dog who cannot be safely off-leash among large numbers of exercising people and animals does not belong at Chrissy Field at all.


            Merritt Clifton
            Editor, ANIMAL PEOPLE
            P.O. Box 960
            Clinton, WA 98236

            Telephone: 360-579-2505
            Cell: 360-969-0450
            Fax: 360-579-2575
            E-mail: anmlpepl@...
            Web: www.animalpeoplenews.org

            [Your donations help to support ANIMAL PEOPLE, providing original investigative coverage of animal protection worldwide since 1992. Our global readership includes the decision-makers at more than 7,000 animal protection organizations. We have no alignment or affiliation with any other entity. Free online; $24/year by post; for free sample, please send postal address. Our annual Watchdog Report on Animal Charities, evaluating 174 of the most prominent animal charities in the U.S. and abroad, is $25.]
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