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How To Be A Marketing Queen

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  • Steve
    You have permission to publish this article electronically or in print, free of charge, as long as the bylines are included. A courtesy copy of your
    Message 1 of 1 , Jan 3, 2010
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      You have permission to publish this article electronically
      or in print, free of charge, as long as the bylines are
      included. A courtesy copy of your publication would be
      appreciated - send to sue@....

      Title: How To Be A Marketing Queen

      Word Count: 726
      Author: Sue Painter
      Email: sue@...
      Category: Business - General
      Article URL: http://www.submityourarticle.com/articles/easypublish.php?art_id=78773

      The article is preformatted to 60CPL.



      How To Be A Marketing Queen

      Here's a story about a savvy marketing women and how she
      fulfilled a customer need by creative thinking and going
      the extra mile.

      Background: For a marketing campaign, I wanted to offer a
      gift card toward a cup of coffee to a business networking
      group's membership. I needed 150 gift cards, each worth two
      dollars. First I called Starbucks and was told that they
      would not do gift cards for less than five dollars each.

      Next I called Border's and was assured that yes, they could
      do the two dollar gift cards but they refused to get them
      started over the phone (would not take a credit card for
      them by phone. I had to show up in person and stand there
      while they processed 150 two dollar gift cards. Given that,
      I canceled an appointment and drove over to stand in line,
      only to be told when I got to the head of the line that
      "oh, sorry, I was so wrong, we can only do gift cards for
      five dollars or more." So much for the training of Border's
      employees.

      Next stop, McDonald's. Guess what? They ALSO can only do
      five dollars. But at least the manager there offered their
      printed "McDonald dollars" gift books that I could tear
      apart and use. The only problem was that she had only $85
      worth of these in the entire store, I needed $300. I took
      what she had and left, daunted at the prospect of stopping
      by another 2 or 3 McDonald's to find the rest.

      The real deal: Hardee's is not far down the street so I
      thought it was worth a stop to ask there. Jan Sweet, the
      manager, was very welcoming and said she could do the two
      dollar gift cards, even though she had to ring them up one
      at a time. Setting to her task, she was shocked to find out
      that Hardee's computers were like everyone else's,
      programmed to accept only five dollars or more. "This is
      crazy," she said, frowning. "We have people come in here
      all the time who need a few dollars for sports teams and
      teachers." Determined, she called both her district manager
      and her marketing person only to hear that their computers
      did not serve her need.

      Queen of Marketing struts her stuff: Jan was absolutely
      determined to make her customer (me) happy AND quickly
      realized I was sending 150 people her way, who would more
      than likely purchase more than the two dollars worth of
      coffee I was gifting them with. She rooted in the safe for
      "Hardee dollars" only to find that they were out. She
      actually offered to stay late that evening and print up a
      special coupon just for me, pointing out that the only
      downside would be that the recipients would then have to
      come to her store - she couldn't make and sell a special
      coupon that would be good at any Hardee's. It wasn't a
      perfect solution for me, but it WAS a solution. I agreed to
      it.

      Giving me something free to drink, she disappeared into her
      office while I waited. Suddenly, she re-appeared with some
      gift coupons in her hand left over from another in-store
      promotion. They were for an entire Hardee's breakfast
      (about $4.00 in value). Waving them at me, she offered to
      sell them to me for $2.50 each, and she had enough to
      fulfill all I needed. Deal done!

      The smarts: Jan is one smart manager. She took care of an
      urgent need from her customer (I needed the things the next
      morning), she upsold me, she offered me a great value
      allowing me to look even better to my gift recipients, and
      she made sure I knew that she'd be glad to always come up
      with something special and give me a good deal if I ever
      needed something in the future. A good business
      relationship was made! I will talk her up to everyone I
      know as one of the rare managers who is a small cog in a
      huge machine and who actually provides true customer
      service.

      The next time a potential customer asks you for something
      you don't offer, think about how you can work around it to
      get the job done. It'll help your business and make a
      loyal customer, too!

      (c) Sue Painter


      About the Author:

      Sue Painter spends her time coaching people to create work
      that is rich in spirit and profit. You can check out her
      marketing tips at http://www.confidentmarketer.com and on
      the YouTube channel confidentmarketer. Sue's marketing
      expertise and strong insight leads her clients to call her
      a marketing therapist. She can help you build your business
      from the inside out.

















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