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Re: [a_film_by] Re: Ripleymania

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  • Fred Camper
    I ve seen The Chase about twice but decades ago. I liked it very much, and it has a scene, maybe five minutes, of true delirium, in which a character as no
    Message 1 of 14 , Mar 26, 2004
      I've seen "The Chase" about twice but decades ago. I liked it very much,
      and it has a scene, maybe five minutes, of true delirium, in which a
      character as no idea what's happening, full of repetitions or
      semi-repitions, that's great. If somenoe remembers the scene and likes
      it as much as I do, feel free to provide a better description.

      - Fred C.
    • Robert Keser
      It s not fair, I think, to describe the delirium scene from The Chase if some people are going to see it for the first time soon because it s a major plot
      Message 2 of 14 , Mar 26, 2004
        It's not fair, I think, to describe the "delirium" scene from
        The Chase if some people are going to see it for the first time
        soon because it's a major plot twist and kicks the movie into
        a different register (which is partly what makes it memorable).
        A number of elements in the film reminded me of Welles,
        especially the Havana scenes that exude that sense of
        rotting grandeur in Touch of Evil, and there's a baroque
        sort of Chinese curio shop that seems straight out of Mr.
        Arkadin. However, it seems a lot more erotic than other
        Welles films, except of course Lady From Shanghai, and Ripley
        plays with light and shadows and textures enough to satisfy
        Sternberg! The lushly neurasthenic musical score (in high 1940s
        style) is used in interesting ways too.

        --Robert Keser

        --- In a_film_by@yahoogroups.com, Fred Camper <f@f...> wrote:
        > I've seen "The Chase" about twice but decades ago. I liked it very
        much,
        > and it has a scene, maybe five minutes, of true delirium, in which
        a
        > character as no idea what's happening, full of repetitions or
        > semi-repitions, that's great. If somenoe remembers the scene and
        likes
        > it as much as I do, feel free to provide a better description.
        >
        > - Fred C.
      • Craig Keller
        I was wondering if anyone on the list was planning on attending this (in general, or more specifically the press invite early on opening day with Christiane
        Message 3 of 14 , Mar 26, 2004
          I was wondering if anyone on the list was planning on attending this
          (in general, or more specifically the press invite early on opening day
          with Christiane and Jan Harlan on hand) --

          http://www.stanleykubrick.de/

          For me, this exhibit is the chance of a lifetime -- I'll probably
          attend sometime in June.

          craig.
        • Zach Campbell
          ... The book KINGS OF THE B S (edited by Todd McCarthy and Charles Flynn, 1975) has a piece on THUNDER ROAD by Richard Thompson. Although a big photograph of
          Message 4 of 14 , Mar 27, 2004
            Filipe:
            > even the ocasional review of Thunder Road usually barely mentions
            > [Arthur Ripley's] existence).

            The book KINGS OF THE B'S (edited by Todd McCarthy and Charles
            Flynn, 1975) has a piece on THUNDER ROAD by Richard Thompson.
            Although a big photograph of Arthur Ripley occupies the page
            opposite the first page of the article ("Thunder Road: Maudit--'The
            Devil Got Him First'"), the piece itself focuses entirely on
            Mitchum. The one paragraph that seems to mention Ripley (from my
            brief scan anyway) says he was a good choice to direct Mitchum's
            vision because of his "Stone Age" shooting style.

            I keep running into these relevant books at the library purely by
            accident ...

            --Zach
          • hotlove666
            ... Alas, it s April 3 at 9:15.
            Message 5 of 14 , Mar 27, 2004
              >
              > When is it playing? (I might be in LA at the end of April, so
              > maybe I could take my own advice!)
              >
              > --Robert Keser
              >
              Alas, it's April 3 at 9:15.
            • hotlove666
              ... Not quite - many of the key documents from the archives - like maybe 3000 pp. worth! - will be available in book form one of these days, when the girl
              Message 6 of 14 , Mar 27, 2004
                >
                > For me, this exhibit is the chance of a lifetime -- I'll probably
                > attend sometime in June.
                >
                > craig.
                Not quite - many of the key documents from the archives - like maybe
                3000 pp. worth! - will be available in book form one of these days,
                when the girl laboring in the very same barn has finished her work,
                as The Ultimate Kubrick. One of those books-in-a-box.
              • hotlove666
                ... That description, of course, is uninformed, and typical of the style even good critics use to write about low-budget films. The book also contains the
                Message 7 of 14 , Mar 27, 2004
                  --- In a_film_by@yahoogroups.com, "Zach Campbell" <rashomon82@y...>
                  wrote:
                  > Filipe:
                  > > even the ocasional review of Thunder Road usually barely mentions
                  > > [Arthur Ripley's] existence).
                  >
                  > The book KINGS OF THE B'S (edited by Todd McCarthy and Charles
                  > Flynn, 1975) has a piece on THUNDER ROAD by Richard Thompson.

                  That description, of course, is uninformed, and typical of the style
                  even good critics use to write about low-budget films. The book also
                  contains the famous quote from Ulmer, who finished Prisoner of Japan
                  at PRC when AR fell ill. "Ripley was a very sick man. Bogdanovich:
                  Mentally or physically? EGU: Mentally AND physically."

                  Filipe, I was only able to see Candle in the Wind at the home of a
                  friend, Lee Sanders, who sold his 16 print to the French
                  Cinematheque. I hope they are preserving it. It's a beautiful film,
                  and possible the most despairing film ever made.
                • Chris Fujiwara
                  There is some material on Ripley in Lee Server s Robert Mitchum biography (St. Martin s Press, 2001). Ripley is described as a heavy drinker with strange
                  Message 8 of 14 , Mar 27, 2004
                    There is some material on Ripley in Lee Server's Robert Mitchum
                    biography (St. Martin's Press, 2001). Ripley is described as a heavy
                    drinker with strange personal habits ("he seldom changed clothes or
                    bathed... he looked so frighteningly unkempt that intermediaries hid
                    him under blankets" when Walter Wanger visited the set of a film
                    Ripley was shooting for Wanger; I presume this was I Met My Love
                    Again).

                    Server quotes Joshua Logan as calling Ripley "a true movie man.... He
                    knew everything there was to know. An inspired man, almost a
                    clairvoyant."

                    Matthew Bernstein's book on Walter Wanger says that Ripley suggested
                    ideas for scenes that were added to Borzage's History Is Made at
                    Night after the film had been finished and previewed.

                    Edgar G. Ulmer told Peter Bogdanovich that Ripley was "a sick man...
                    mentally and physically."

                    Was it mentioned here already that Ripley directed some of the best
                    W. C. Fields shorts?

                    --- In a_film_by@yahoogroups.com, "Zach Campbell" <rashomon82@y...>
                    wrote:
                  • Craig Keller
                    ... Well, in the flesh and all. A catalogue of the exhibit will also be purchasable -- you can download a PDF of the order-form from the exhibit s site to
                    Message 9 of 14 , Mar 27, 2004
                      > > For me, this exhibit is the chance of a lifetime -- I'll probably
                      > > attend sometime in June.
                      > >
                      > > craig.
                      > Not quite - many of the key documents from the archives - like maybe
                      > 3000 pp. worth! - will be available in book form one of these days,
                      > when the girl laboring in the very same barn has finished her work,
                      > as The Ultimate Kubrick. One of those books-in-a-box.

                      Well, in the "flesh" and all. A catalogue of the exhibit will also be
                      purchasable -- you can download a PDF of the order-form from the
                      exhibit's site to print out and mail in.

                      Is the Taschen project the books of the archive documents that you're
                      referring to? I know they've got one massive general volume of
                      works-in-progress and then some ('Aryan Papers,' 'Wartime Lies,'
                      'A.I.') planned for some point in the future, with Christiane's full
                      involvement -- and they're putting another volume together that will be
                      dedicated solely to 'Napoleon,' reproducing his "master script" in full
                      facsimile.

                      Ah, here it is, found the site. The project is called Kubrick:Oeuvre --

                      http://www.taschen.com/pages/en/excerpts/film/show/1/53.htm

                      Again, joyous excitement -- from me at least.

                      craig.

                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Craig Keller
                      I should also note that in the Weekend magazine supplement of The Guardian today, there s a big article on the archives in Hertfordshire -- I don t think this
                      Message 10 of 14 , Mar 27, 2004
                        I should also note that in the Weekend magazine supplement of The
                        Guardian today, there's a big article on the archives in Hertfordshire
                        -- I don't think this is available online, but I could be wrong. If I
                        can't find a copy in New York this weekend, a friend already has one
                        and is making scans for me, so if anyone is interested, just email me
                        privately and I'll forward them on once I receive them.

                        craig.
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