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Re: [a_film_by] Re: A little factual Minnelli/Stuart Byron question

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  • Fred Camper
    ... No, I m sure Byron talked about freedom and Minnelli, unless my brain is completely fried. I don t think it is: I m one of those people who wasn t really
    Message 1 of 44 , Jan 1, 2004
      joe_mcelhaney wrote:

      >However, I wonder, Fred, if you're not thinking of Paul Mayersberg's
      >essays on Preminger
      >
      No, I'm sure Byron talked about freedom and Minnelli, unless my brain is
      completely fried. I don't think it is: I'm one of those people who
      wasn't really "there" in the 60s (as in "If you can remember the 60s,
      you weren't really there"), so I'm hoping my memory is still OK. Byron
      correctly identified freedom with spatial depth at the ends of "Some
      Came Running" and "Home From the Hill," I believe, but then used the
      same kind of equation to wax over-enthusiastic about the (to my mind,
      too schematic visually) ending of "On a Clear Day."

      But while I can't remember if he talks about this scene, I think his
      formulation is extremely useful for (for example) considering the
      relationship of the Halloween sequence (by far the best part of the
      film, in my view) in "Meet Me in St. Louis" to the whole.

      - Fred
    • David Ehrenstein
      I believe this was a collaboration. Walters always worked close-in with his performers on their moves.This si the way the number starts, but when it breaks out
      Message 44 of 44 , Jan 25, 2004
        I believe this was a collaboration. Walters always
        worked close-in with his performers on their
        moves.This si the way the number starts, but when it
        breaks out into larger pattersn -- particularly the
        great track over the counter as ice cream sodas are
        lined up in the foreground with the dangers in the
        background, Alton comes into play. "The Varsity Drag"
        is all his. "The French Lesson" is all Walters.

        --- Dan Sallitt <sallitt@...> wrote:
        > > I quickly did a bit of research of my own since I
        > posted that note
        > > and Walters has claimed that he left the
        > production numbers on GOOD
        > > NEWS and EASTER PARADE to Alton and that he
        > concentrated on the more
        > > intimate numbers (a bit like Hawks on BLONDES).
        >
        > But didn't Walters do the "Pass the Peace Pipe" song
        > in GOOD NEWS, which
        > is a pretty big number? That's probably what most
        > people remember about
        > the movie first. - Dan
        >
        >


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