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Re: Theatrical Hi-Def

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  • peterhenne
    Thank you very much, Joe. I will contact you shortly about that pdf file. At the moment, I d like to leave open a question about archiving: if chemical prints
    Message 1 of 4 , Jul 20 5:44 PM
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      Thank you very much, Joe. I will contact you shortly about that pdf file. At the moment, I'd like to leave open a question about archiving: if chemical prints are subject to what amounts to a photocopy reductio, what is going to preserve films in the very long term?

      Peter

      --- In a_film_by@yahoogroups.com, Joseph Kaufman <joka@...> wrote:
      >
      > >I'm hoping "Summertime" will be available looking as lush and dense
      > >as it can be 500 years from now, and I'm guessing that digital
      > >promises better storage over the centuries than preserving camera
      > >negatives and archival prints .... Thus the best candidate for
      > >saving film history appears to be digital storage.
      >
      > Peter, digital storage of motion picture material is a huge can of
      > worms. It can be tremendously expensive and require copying over
      > every couple of years to help ensure data integrity. If you want to
      > go into this subject further, I can e-mail you off-list a pdf file
      > called THE DIGITAL DILEMMA: STRATEGIC ISSUES IN ARCHIVING AND
      > ACCESSING DIGITAL MOTION PICTURE MATERIALS, put out by the Science
      > and Technology Council of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and
      > Sciences. It runs 84 pages and goes into quite some detail on the
      > problems of digital storage and current practice both inside and
      > outside the movie industry.
      >
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