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[a_film_by] Re: Theatrical Hi-Def

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  • Joseph Kaufman
    ... Peter, digital storage of motion picture material is a huge can of worms. It can be tremendously expensive and require copying over every couple of years
    Message 1 of 4 , Jul 20, 2009
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      >I'm hoping "Summertime" will be available looking as lush and dense
      >as it can be 500 years from now, and I'm guessing that digital
      >promises better storage over the centuries than preserving camera
      >negatives and archival prints .... Thus the best candidate for
      >saving film history appears to be digital storage.

      Peter, digital storage of motion picture material is a huge can of
      worms. It can be tremendously expensive and require copying over
      every couple of years to help ensure data integrity. If you want to
      go into this subject further, I can e-mail you off-list a pdf file
      called THE DIGITAL DILEMMA: STRATEGIC ISSUES IN ARCHIVING AND
      ACCESSING DIGITAL MOTION PICTURE MATERIALS, put out by the Science
      and Technology Council of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and
      Sciences. It runs 84 pages and goes into quite some detail on the
      problems of digital storage and current practice both inside and
      outside the movie industry.
    • peterhenne
      Thank you very much, Joe. I will contact you shortly about that pdf file. At the moment, I d like to leave open a question about archiving: if chemical prints
      Message 2 of 4 , Jul 20, 2009
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        Thank you very much, Joe. I will contact you shortly about that pdf file. At the moment, I'd like to leave open a question about archiving: if chemical prints are subject to what amounts to a photocopy reductio, what is going to preserve films in the very long term?

        Peter

        --- In a_film_by@yahoogroups.com, Joseph Kaufman <joka@...> wrote:
        >
        > >I'm hoping "Summertime" will be available looking as lush and dense
        > >as it can be 500 years from now, and I'm guessing that digital
        > >promises better storage over the centuries than preserving camera
        > >negatives and archival prints .... Thus the best candidate for
        > >saving film history appears to be digital storage.
        >
        > Peter, digital storage of motion picture material is a huge can of
        > worms. It can be tremendously expensive and require copying over
        > every couple of years to help ensure data integrity. If you want to
        > go into this subject further, I can e-mail you off-list a pdf file
        > called THE DIGITAL DILEMMA: STRATEGIC ISSUES IN ARCHIVING AND
        > ACCESSING DIGITAL MOTION PICTURE MATERIALS, put out by the Science
        > and Technology Council of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and
        > Sciences. It runs 84 pages and goes into quite some detail on the
        > problems of digital storage and current practice both inside and
        > outside the movie industry.
        >
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