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Re: [a_film_by] Brazilian films at MOMA

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  • filipefurtado
    Way better than usual thanks for Eduardo Coutinho s retro. Coutinho is one of my favorite filmmakers current working, so it s great to hear his getting a retro
    Message 1 of 10 , Jun 20, 2009
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      Way better than usual thanks for Eduardo Coutinho's retro. Coutinho is one of my favorite filmmakers current working, so it's great to hear his getting a retro in NY. Coutinho is a unusual documentary filmmaker in so far as his work is a method more than an actual a subject, all but the earliest (A Man Labeled to Die) and his most recent (Moscow) are talking heads docs in which Coutinho, who is a great talker, interviews people who have being previously interviewed by a reserach tean, so both parties are already somewhat aware of both questions and answers which highlights how much people are usually given a performance for his camera. His more recent work has being much more meta abou that (Playing mixes the actual interviews with staged versions of the same interviews, Moscow has him hiring a theatrical group to rehearse Chekov's Three Sisters with a stege director of their choosing for three weeks). I'd reccomend all 8 films except Babilonia 2000 (which is good bu t by far
      his least interesting work), but if one has to choose just a few I'd say go for A Man Labeled to Die, Master, Playing and Moscow.

      Except for the Coutinho films, I like Should Nothing Else Work Out, like most of Jose Eduardo Belmonte's films it's uneven, but the highs are worth it. December is an annoyng Cassavetes/Martel pastiche that has some fans around here, some friens of mine think the laziness in Youth's direction is charming and That's It (which I haven't seen yet) got some positive reviews but I suspect the writers are more interested in the director being 19 year old than the actual movie. Also, avoid Bruno Barreto latest crime against cinema at all costs.

      Filipe

      Em 20/06/2009 11:34, Dan Sallitt < sallitt@... > escreveu:








      I wonder if I may trouble our Brazilian contingent once again to post any comments on MOMA's annual series of new Brazilian films:

      http://press.moma.org/images/press/premierebrazil/PremiereBrazil09RELEASE_FINAL.pdf

      or:

      http://moma.org/visit/calendar/films/978

      Thanks, as always. - Dan
    • Eduardo Valente
      I would second Filipe´s comments, only adding that IMHO Coutinho´s Playing should also not be missed, and reinforce that every film not mentioned by Filipe
      Message 2 of 10 , Jun 20, 2009
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        I would second Filipe´s comments, only adding that IMHO Coutinho´s
        Playing should also not be missed, and reinforce that every film not
        mentioned by Filipe should definitely be missed.

        On Sat, Jun 20, 2009 at 2:13 PM, filipefurtado<filipefurtado@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        >
        > Way better than usual thanks for Eduardo Coutinho's retro. Coutinho is one
        > of my favorite filmmakers current working, so it's great to hear his getting
        > a retro in NY. Coutinho is a unusual documentary filmmaker in so far as his
        > work is a method more than an actual a subject, all but the earliest (A Man
        > Labeled to Die) and his most recent (Moscow) are talking heads docs in which
        > Coutinho, who is a great talker, interviews people who have being previously
        > interviewed by a reserach tean, so both parties are already somewhat aware
        > of both questions and answers which highlights how much people are usually
        > given a performance for his camera. His more recent work has being much more
        > meta abou that (Playing mixes the actual interviews with staged versions of
        > the same interviews, Moscow has him hiring a theatrical group to rehearse
        > Chekov's Three Sisters with a stege director of their choosing for three
        > weeks). I'd reccomend all 8 films except Babilonia 2000 (which is good bu t
        > by far
        > his least interesting work), but if one has to choose just a few I'd say go
        > for A Man Labeled to Die, Master, Playing and Moscow.
        >
        > Except for the Coutinho films, I like Should Nothing Else Work Out, like
        > most of Jose Eduardo Belmonte's films it's uneven, but the highs are worth
        > it. December is an annoyng Cassavetes/Martel pastiche that has some fans
        > around here, some friens of mine think the laziness in Youth's direction is
        > charming and That's It (which I haven't seen yet) got some positive reviews
        > but I suspect the writers are more interested in the director being 19 year
        > old than the actual movie. Also, avoid Bruno Barreto latest crime against
        > cinema at all costs.
        >
        > Filipe
        >
        > Em 20/06/2009 11:34, Dan Sallitt < sallitt@... >
        > escreveu:
        >
        > I wonder if I may trouble our Brazilian contingent once again to post any
        > comments on MOMA's annual series of new Brazilian films:
        >
        > http://press.moma.org/images/press/premierebrazil/PremiereBrazil09RELEASE_FINAL.pdf
        >
        > or:
        >
        > http://moma.org/visit/calendar/films/978
        >
        > Thanks, as always. - Dan
        >
        >
      • Dan Sallitt
        It s raining Brazilian films in NYC. Does anyone have any thoughts on the films in this new series? I know that Bressane has a reputation, though I haven t
        Message 3 of 10 , Aug 2, 2009
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          It's raining Brazilian films in NYC. Does anyone have any thoughts on the films in this new series? I know that Bressane has a reputation, though I haven't seen his films:

          http://www.brazilianfilmfestival.com/eventos.php?type=10&id_cidade=13&idioma=EN&id_menu=39

          In the MOMA series, so far I've seen MOSCOW, which I found intriguing and finally appealing, and the Belmonte, which I didn't enjoy much at all. Thanks for your recommendations! - Dan

          --- In a_film_by@yahoogroups.com, Eduardo Valente <solalaranjado@...> wrote:
          >
          > I would second Filipe´s comments, only adding that IMHO Coutinho´s
          > Playing should also not be missed, and reinforce that every film not
          > mentioned by Filipe should definitely be missed.
          >
          > On Sat, Jun 20, 2009 at 2:13 PM, filipefurtado<filipefurtado@...> wrote:
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > Way better than usual thanks for Eduardo Coutinho's retro. Coutinho is one
          > > of my favorite filmmakers current working, so it's great to hear his getting
          > > a retro in NY. Coutinho is a unusual documentary filmmaker in so far as his
          > > work is a method more than an actual a subject, all but the earliest (A Man
          > > Labeled to Die) and his most recent (Moscow) are talking heads docs in which
          > > Coutinho, who is a great talker, interviews people who have being previously
          > > interviewed by a reserach tean, so both parties are already somewhat aware
          > > of both questions and answers which highlights how much people are usually
          > > given a performance for his camera. His more recent work has being much more
          > > meta abou that (Playing mixes the actual interviews with staged versions of
          > > the same interviews, Moscow has him hiring a theatrical group to rehearse
          > > Chekov's Three Sisters with a stege director of their choosing for three
          > > weeks). I'd reccomend all 8 films except Babilonia 2000 (which is good bu t
          > > by far
          > > his least interesting work), but if one has to choose just a few I'd say go
          > > for A Man Labeled to Die, Master, Playing and Moscow.
          > >
          > > Except for the Coutinho films, I like Should Nothing Else Work Out, like
          > > most of Jose Eduardo Belmonte's films it's uneven, but the highs are worth
          > > it. December is an annoyng Cassavetes/Martel pastiche that has some fans
          > > around here, some friens of mine think the laziness in Youth's direction is
          > > charming and That's It (which I haven't seen yet) got some positive reviews
          > > but I suspect the writers are more interested in the director being 19 year
          > > old than the actual movie. Also, avoid Bruno Barreto latest crime against
          > > cinema at all costs.
          > >
          > > Filipe
          > >
          > > Em 20/06/2009 11:34, Dan Sallitt < sallitt@... >
          > > escreveu:
          > >
          > > I wonder if I may trouble our Brazilian contingent once again to post any
          > > comments on MOMA's annual series of new Brazilian films:
          > >
          > > http://press.moma.org/images/press/premierebrazil/PremiereBrazil09RELEASE_FINAL.pdf
          > >
          > > or:
          > >
          > > http://moma.org/visit/calendar/films/978
          > >
          > > Thanks, as always. - Dan
          > >
          > >
          >
        • Ruy Gardnier
          I would vehemently reccomend against any fiction except for the Bressane and ROMANCE (which I haven t seen, but some good people seem to like). But I don t
          Message 4 of 10 , Aug 2, 2009
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            I would vehemently reccomend against any fiction except for the Bressane and ROMANCE (which I haven't seen, but some good people seem to like). But I don't think it's a very good Bressane. Actually it is the one I like the least among the, say, 25 I've seen. The docs, you go if you like (or are interested by) the music. Loki, about Arnaldo Baptista - of Os Mutantes fame, 60s psych rock -, is particularly compelling; Favela on Blast is a pasionate view on the "funk carioca" movement, the trashy-electrofunk also known as "baile funk". Although none of them is particularly interesting for the mise-en-scène, they make interesting viewing experiences.

            About MOSCOW, it's an exercice on error much like Lars Von Trier's THE BOSS OF IT ALL, but way better on the approach on error and fragmented bits the structure comes with (the Trier is nothing more then a self-conscious joke, whereas here we are in deep waters). Non-direction, lack of control, it all seems very important for Coutinho right now. But I don't know exactly how much of it is visible for anyone unfamiliar with some of his other works. I know for sure that every bit of text written on the film in Brazil skipped the real question the film comes with.

            ruy

            ----- Original Message -----
            From: Dan Sallitt
            To: a_film_by@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Sunday, August 02, 2009 10:45 PM
            Subject: [a_film_by] Re: Brazilian films at MOMA


            It's raining Brazilian films in NYC. Does anyone have any thoughts on the films in this new series? I know that Bressane has a reputation, though I haven't seen his films:

            http://www.brazilianfilmfestival.com/eventos.php?type=10&id_cidade=13&idioma=EN&id_menu=39

            In the MOMA series, so far I've seen MOSCOW, which I found intriguing and finally appealing, and the Belmonte, which I didn't enjoy much at all. Thanks for your recommendations! - Dan

            --- In a_film_by@yahoogroups.com, Eduardo Valente <solalaranjado@...> wrote:
            >
            > I would second Filipe´s comments, only adding that IMHO Coutinho´s
            > Playing should also not be missed, and reinforce that every film not
            > mentioned by Filipe should definitely be missed.
            >
            > On Sat, Jun 20, 2009 at 2:13 PM, filipefurtado<filipefurtado@...> wrote:
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > Way better than usual thanks for Eduardo Coutinho's retro. Coutinho is one
            > > of my favorite filmmakers current working, so it's great to hear his getting
            > > a retro in NY. Coutinho is a unusual documentary filmmaker in so far as his
            > > work is a method more than an actual a subject, all but the earliest (A Man
            > > Labeled to Die) and his most recent (Moscow) are talking heads docs in which
            > > Coutinho, who is a great talker, interviews people who have being previously
            > > interviewed by a reserach tean, so both parties are already somewhat aware
            > > of both questions and answers which highlights how much people are usually
            > > given a performance for his camera. His more recent work has being much more
            > > meta abou that (Playing mixes the actual interviews with staged versions of
            > > the same interviews, Moscow has him hiring a theatrical group to rehearse
            > > Chekov's Three Sisters with a stege director of their choosing for three
            > > weeks). I'd reccomend all 8 films except Babilonia 2000 (which is good bu t
            > > by far
            > > his least interesting work), but if one has to choose just a few I'd say go
            > > for A Man Labeled to Die, Master, Playing and Moscow.
            > >
            > > Except for the Coutinho films, I like Should Nothing Else Work Out, like
            > > most of Jose Eduardo Belmonte's films it's uneven, but the highs are worth
            > > it. December is an annoyng Cassavetes/Martel pastiche that has some fans
            > > around here, some friens of mine think the laziness in Youth's direction is
            > > charming and That's It (which I haven't seen yet) got some positive reviews
            > > but I suspect the writers are more interested in the director being 19 year
            > > old than the actual movie. Also, avoid Bruno Barreto latest crime against
            > > cinema at all costs.
            > >
            > > Filipe
            > >
            > > Em 20/06/2009 11:34, Dan Sallitt < sallitt@... >
            > > escreveu:
            > >
            > > I wonder if I may trouble our Brazilian contingent once again to post any
            > > comments on MOMA's annual series of new Brazilian films:
            > >
            > > http://press.moma.org/images/press/premierebrazil/PremiereBrazil09RELEASE_FINAL.pdf
            > >
            > > or:
            > >
            > > http://moma.org/visit/calendar/films/978
            > >
            > > Thanks, as always. - Dan
            > >
            > >
            >





            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Bilge Ebiri
            ... Um, them s fighting words w/r/t THE BOSS OF IT ALL, which I consider to be one of the more underrated films of the past few years. I d be curious to see
            Message 5 of 10 , Aug 2, 2009
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              >About MOSCOW, it's an exercice on error much like Lars Von Trier's THE BOSS
              >OF IT ALL,
              >but way better on the approach on error and fragmented bits the structure
              >comes with
              >(the Trier is nothing more then a self-conscious joke, whereas here we are
              >in deep waters).

              Um, them's fighting words w/r/t THE BOSS OF IT ALL, which I consider to be
              one of the more underrated films of the past few years. I'd be curious to
              see why you think it's nothing more than a self-conscious joke (unless you
              feel that way about all of LVT's films, in which case never mind).

              -Bilge
            • Dan Sallitt
              I think the ideas you talk about were quite visible, Ruy: they are even announced at that roundtable discussion near the beginning, when Coutinho (I presume)
              Message 6 of 10 , Aug 3, 2009
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                I think the ideas you talk about were quite visible, Ruy: they are even
                announced at that roundtable discussion near the beginning, when Coutinho
                (I presume) and the theater director talk about wanted to create something
                that would be rough and unfinished. And then the performances become less
                splashy and more interior in steps along the way. It's interesting that
                Coutinho gives us just enough of Chekhov's narrative to keep the audience
                engaged with the play's story, but not enough that there's any danger of
                the film turning into a Chekhov adaptation - it's a balance between
                experiment and audience friendliness. - Dan

                --- In a_film_by@yahoogroups.com, "Ruy Gardnier" <ruygardnier@...> wrote:

                > About MOSCOW, it's an exercice on error much like Lars Von Trier's THE
                BOSS OF IT ALL, but way better on the approach on error and fragmented
                bits the structure comes with (the Trier is nothing more then a
                self-conscious joke, whereas here we are in deep waters). Non-direction,
                lack of control, it all seems very important for Coutinho right now. But I
                don't know exactly how much of it is visible for anyone unfamiliar with
                some of his other works.
              • Ruy Gardnier
                To put it shortly, I d say that since DANCER IN THE DARK he has flattened his provocative approach on manipulation to meet some kind of mainstream standards of
                Message 7 of 10 , Aug 3, 2009
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                  To put it shortly, I'd say that since DANCER IN THE DARK he has flattened his provocative approach on manipulation to meet some kind of mainstream standards of "shock politics". Before that, I liked his works, well, the ones I've seen: certainly BREAKING THE WAVES and THE IDIOTS, his two best imho, and THE KINGDOM.
                  About THE BOSS OF IT ALL, I think he spoils what could be a frank approach on non-control with this very witty script and mainly with his voiceover. Why would someone play with a framing device if he's so sure of himself and able to print his credentials in everything else he throws on the screen? In MOSCOW, the final voiceover (there's one in the beginning and one final one, if I remember well) self-effaces abruptly, giving us a strong sense of fragmentation and incompleteness. I don't get that at all in the LvT film: all I get is the sense of watching a very badly framed and edited episode of THE OFFICE.

                  ruy

                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: Bilge Ebiri
                  To: a_film_by@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Monday, August 03, 2009 1:29 AM
                  Subject: Re: [a_film_by] Re: Brazilian films at MOMA



                  >About MOSCOW, it's an exercice on error much like Lars Von Trier's THE BOSS
                  >OF IT ALL,
                  >but way better on the approach on error and fragmented bits the structure
                  >comes with
                  >(the Trier is nothing more then a self-conscious joke, whereas here we are
                  >in deep waters).

                  Um, them's fighting words w/r/t THE BOSS OF IT ALL, which I consider to be
                  one of the more underrated films of the past few years. I'd be curious to
                  see why you think it's nothing more than a self-conscious joke (unless you
                  feel that way about all of LVT's films, in which case never mind).

                  -Bilge





                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Bilge Ebiri
                  ... I m not entirely sure what you mean with that last sentence. THE BOSS OF IT ALL, as you seem to have also ascertained, is a film that s entirely about the
                  Message 8 of 10 , Aug 3, 2009
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                    > About THE BOSS OF IT ALL, I think he spoils what could be a frank approach
                    > on non-control with this very witty script and mainly with his voiceover.
                    > Why would
                    >someone play with a framing device if he's so sure of himself and able to
                    >print his
                    >credentials in everything else he throws on the screen?

                    I'm not entirely sure what you mean with that last sentence. THE BOSS OF IT
                    ALL, as you seem to have also ascertained, is a film that's entirely about
                    the ways in which people pass the buck. The main character passes the buck
                    to someone who doesn't exist, claiming that his company is run by someone
                    more powerful than he. The director passes the buck by claiming that he is
                    not framing the actual shots but that something called "AUTOMAVISION" is
                    actually randomly shooting the movie. In addition to that, LVT gives us a
                    voiceover explaining that the film is supposed to be light, comedic,
                    meaningless, which is another way of passing the buck.

                    I dunno, I find this to be a deeply haunting film, especially as it was made
                    right around the time LVT was making a break with religion for good, and
                    apparently right before the alleged near-mental breakdown that led to
                    ANTI-CHRIST.


                    -Bilge
                  • Ruy Gardnier
                    That s an interesting, almost odd reaction to the film, Dan. I don t think anyone in Brazil would come with the expression audience friendliness to describe
                    Message 9 of 10 , Aug 3, 2009
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                      That's an interesting, almost odd reaction to the film, Dan. I don't think anyone in Brazil would come with the expression "audience friendliness" to describe the film. It lacks a warmth that was always in other Coutinho films, and the audience I watched the film with certainly had a somewhat cold response to it. I agree with what you say about the balance, though.

                      ruy

                      ----- Original Message -----
                      From: Dan Sallitt
                      To: a_film_by@yahoogroups.com
                      Cc: Dan Sallitt
                      Sent: Monday, August 03, 2009 11:59 AM
                      Subject: [a_film_by] Re: Brazilian films at MOMA


                      I think the ideas you talk about were quite visible, Ruy: they are even
                      announced at that roundtable discussion near the beginning, when Coutinho
                      (I presume) and the theater director talk about wanted to create something
                      that would be rough and unfinished. And then the performances become less
                      splashy and more interior in steps along the way. It's interesting that
                      Coutinho gives us just enough of Chekhov's narrative to keep the audience
                      engaged with the play's story, but not enough that there's any danger of
                      the film turning into a Chekhov adaptation - it's a balance between
                      experiment and audience friendliness. - Dan

                      --- In a_film_by@yahoogroups.com, "Ruy Gardnier" <ruygardnier@...> wrote:

                      > About MOSCOW, it's an exercice on error much like Lars Von Trier's THE
                      BOSS OF IT ALL, but way better on the approach on error and fragmented
                      bits the structure comes with (the Trier is nothing more then a
                      self-conscious joke, whereas here we are in deep waters). Non-direction,
                      lack of control, it all seems very important for Coutinho right now. But I
                      don't know exactly how much of it is visible for anyone unfamiliar with
                      some of his other works.




                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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