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Re: "All That Heaven Allows" (Douglas Sirk, 1955)

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  • peterhenne
    Since the Hudson character is self-employed and evidently the sole proprietor of his business, I m not sure if it makes sense to say he s salaried. That kind
    Message 1 of 13 , Jan 26, 2009
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      Since the Hudson character is self-employed and evidently the sole
      proprietor of his business, I'm not sure if it makes sense to say
      he's "salaried." That kind of small-time entrepeneurship wasn't
      nearly esteemed then like it often is now. I agree that the film is
      trying to show their wealth is not so different as a mid-1950s
      audience might assume. However I think there are connotations of
      class differences between Ron and Cary. For one thing, the latter
      doesn't work for a living. Her comfortable New England family home
      probably signified to contemporary audiences her living securely off
      of investments and savings, amassed by her deceased husband. Her home
      would have significantly higher property value than Ron's more
      functional home and barn. Like her, he has inherited his home from
      family, but we have every reason to believe he needs to work to
      support himself. Ron hasn't raised two children, and though he
      invites all three to live at his place, Cary's son and daughter are
      both about to leave the nest and won't be a financial burden. I don't
      recall that we are given indications Ron has enough economic means to
      have supported children from their birth to adulthood. Maybe she
      is "upper middle class" and he is "middle class," or she is "middle
      class" and he is just outside of that financial rung.

      Peter Henne






      --- In a_film_by@yahoogroups.com, "Richard Modiano" <tharpa2002@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > --- In a_film_by@yahoogroups.com, "Michael E. Grost" <mike@> wrote:
      > >
      > "...I don't think Sirk is trying to induce sexual shock. Instead,
      he is
      > looking at materialistic social class climbing versus intellectual
      > bohemianism."
      >
      > I don't think Sirk was drawing a contrast between white collar
      > workers/salaried professionals and blue collar workers/wage
      earners,
      > but rather between contrasting manners and mores. After all, a
      > landscape gardner was a salaried professional, albeit a blue collar
      one.
      >
      > The Rock Hudson character is a Thoreau-like figure who lives close
      to
      > nature. His set of friends are casually dressed without being
      uncouth
      > and ignore the more artificial affectations of middle class
      manners. If
      > memory serves, one of them is an artist or writer.
      >
      > Richard
      >
    • Richard Modiano
      ... ...I think the real basis for shock is the age difference...At a far more meta narrative level the movie is also a discussion between a gay man and a fag
      Message 2 of 13 , Jan 27, 2009
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        --- In a_film_by@yahoogroups.com, "david hare" <davidhare@...> wrote:
        >
        "...I think the real basis for shock is the age difference...At a far
        more meta narrative level the movie is also a discussion between a gay
        man and a fag hag about the roles they undertake in movies..."

        This could almost describe ALI: FEAR EATS THE SOUL as well.
      • Richard Modiano
        ... Since the Hudson character is self-employed and evidently the sole proprietor of his business, I m not sure if it makes sense to say he s salaried. That
        Message 3 of 13 , Jan 27, 2009
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          --- In a_film_by@yahoogroups.com, "peterhenne" <peterhenne@...> wrote:

          Since the Hudson character is self-employed and evidently the sole
          proprietor of his business, I'm not sure if it makes sense to say
          he's 'salaried.' That kind of small-time entrepeneurship wasn't
          nearly esteemed then like it often is now..."

          I have a different memory of that.

          At least among Jews the independent businessman/shop owner was highly
          esteemed, and Chamber of Commerce propaganda extolled the virtues of
          Jefferson's "modern day yeoman farmer the independent entrepreneur." Of
          course, this was indeed devalued by the upper bourgeoisie, the
          inhabitants of the milieu of Sirk's film.

          Richard
        • jess_l_amortell
          ... I don t think anyone has mentioned the line in which Jane Wyman corrects Agnes Moorehead, He s not my _gardener_, Sarah, he comes to trim the trees (I
          Message 4 of 13 , Jan 28, 2009
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            > Since the Hudson character is self-employed and evidently the sole
            > proprietor of his business, I'm not sure if it makes sense to say
            > he's 'salaried.'

            I don't think anyone has mentioned the line in which Jane Wyman
            corrects Agnes Moorehead, "He's not my _gardener_, Sarah, he comes to
            trim the trees" (I hope that's accurate, I'm quoting from an online
            source), a distinction that seems to mean much more to Cary than it
            ever has to me (but which always comes to mind whenever Ron is
            described as a gardener). I guess she's saying she's not sleeping
            with the hired help -- he's an independent contractor, who works in
            the other residents' yards too (he notes that one lady whose trees he
            trims doesn't recognize him -- which does seem to be a class issue).
            For whatever it's worth, I wonder if he bills the individual
            homeowners, or is he paid by the county?
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