Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: Jia

Expand Messages
  • cjsuttree
    I must confess I never understood Jia s appeal. I ve tried to glean a more coherent idea of him by occasioinally reading this board, but so far with little
    Message 1 of 12 , May 17 11:07 PM
      I must confess I never understood Jia's appeal.
      I've tried to glean a more coherent idea of him by
      occasioinally reading this board, but so far with
      little success. I've only seen one and a half of
      his films. _Unknown Pleasure_ just struck me as
      visually ugly. Perhaps this is due to my watching
      it on my pitiful 15" TV, but (to take a random sample
      of recent DVD viewings) _Devils on the Door Steps_,
      _Damnation_, and a slew of films by Neil Jordan
      (whom I used to think of as mainly a brilliant story
      teller) have impressed me so much more visually.
      I read so much rave reviews of his composition and
      such here. Would someone care to list a few scenes
      I should go back and look at?


      I walked out of _The World_ halfway through. It is
      certainly much more beautifully shot, and a couple
      of characters actually don't seem to be stereotypical
      call youths, but that night I couldn't endure another hour
      of lovers' bickering on screen ...
      .
      --- In a_film_by@yahoogroups.com, "samfilms2003" <samw@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > > "China is economically stagnant,
      > > therefore I will not kiss my girlfriend."
      >
      > And when China's on an economic roll, then what ? ;-)
      >
      It had a 8% growth last year, which isn't that bad! And
      not just rich capitalists gained from globalization.
      Artists like Jia got not just their inspiration from
      Western cinema (_Unknown Pleasure_ is filled from one
      end to the other with naked cinematic homages), but also
      much funding and appreciation. Hopefully no one thinks
      Russian prostitutes in China is a good thing, but instead
      of making superficial critique of superficial globalization,
      wouldn't it be better, and more honest, to oppose it
      with a more profound and spiritual type of globalization?
      Of course I didn't stay to the end; maybe he did just
      that later on. I doubt the word "globalization" even
      crossed Malick's mind, but I thought _The New World_ does
      so much more to explore the concept than Jia's film.

      Just because of my prejudice perhaps, I'd hate to think
      of Jia as the poster boy of the "6th generation" directors.
      I've really admired Lou Ye's _Purple Butterfly_, and
      _Devils on the Door Steps_ is as technically sophisticated
      as it is ideologically troubling. I even prefer _Blind
      Shaft_ and _Frozen_. I haven't watched enough recent
      Chinese films but Jia does seem to suck all the oxygen out of
      discussions on cinema out of China.
    • Dan Sallitt
      ... Seeing half of THE WORLD should be enough to give you a sense of whether you like Jia s eye. ... You seem to have an idea of what Jia is trying to do and
      Message 2 of 12 , May 25 11:54 AM
        --- In a_film_by@yahoogroups.com, "cjsuttree" <cjsuttree@...> wrote:

        > I read so much rave reviews of his composition and
        > such here. Would someone care to list a few scenes
        > I should go back and look at?
        >
        > I walked out of _The World_ halfway through. It is
        > certainly much more beautifully shot

        Seeing half of THE WORLD should be enough to give you a sense of whether
        you like Jia's eye.

        > Hopefully no one thinks
        > Russian prostitutes in China is a good thing, but instead
        > of making superficial critique of superficial globalization,
        > wouldn't it be better, and more honest, to oppose it
        > with a more profound and spiritual type of globalization?

        You seem to have an idea of what Jia is trying to do and say with his
        thematic material, which is the very thing that I'm having trouble
        grasping about him. I recently read a Cahiers interview with him where he
        came off as quite the social critic, so maybe he does intend that kind of
        content to support a political position.

        > I haven't watched enough recent Chinese films but Jia does seem to suck
        > all the oxygen out of discussions on cinema out of China.

        Jia is at the top of the heap for me, but China in general is pretty hot
        right now. Anyone see Zhang Lu's GRAIN IN EAR? I'm really curious
        whether he can live up to that - he had a new film at Berlin this year. -
        Dan
      • cjsuttree
        ... whether ... I just read somewhere that _Platform_ has a visual style not unlike that of _Unknown Pleasure_. I should go get it, am just being cheap right
        Message 3 of 12 , May 26 8:04 PM
          --- In a_film_by@yahoogroups.com, Dan Sallitt <sallitt@...> wrote:
          >> Seeing half of THE WORLD should be enough to give you a sense of
          whether
          > you like Jia's eye.
          >
          I just read somewhere that _Platform_ has a visual style
          not unlike that of _Unknown Pleasure_. I should go get
          it, am just being cheap right now (and still boycotting
          Net-flix).


          > You seem to have an idea of what Jia is trying to do and say with
          his
          > thematic material, which is the very thing that I'm having trouble
          > grasping about him. I recently read a Cahiers interview with him
          where he
          > came off as quite the social critic, so maybe he does intend that
          kind of
          > content to support a political position.
          >
          No I don't -- that's why I was asking about him. But that's
          a good point -- I should check out more interviews with him!
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.