Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: Barry Lyndon

Expand Messages
  • hotlove666
    ... His family was always around when he was in pre-pro or shooting or editing, and they were involved in everything he did. Christiane was the unit
    Message 1 of 77 , Aug 22, 2006
      > That daughter is Kubrick's. She grew up and wrote the
      > score for "Full Metal jacket"

      His family was always around when he was in pre-pro or shooting or editing,
      and they were involved in everything he did. Christiane was the unit
      photographer, and she and the girls were always being consulted about
      creative and production decisions, according to Williams. Kubrick was hard
      on everyone else, but very devoted to his family - and his pets. He would stop
      a production meeting to look for a cat that went missing. These are slightly
      exaggerated versions of traits the more proper Hitchcock also had - as was
      the habit of always wearing the same clothes, with five duplicate sets hanging
      in the closet.

      After the latest dust-up about Shyamalyn's "weirdness," it occured to me that a
      lot of press people really don't have much experience of filmmakers. If they
      did, they wouldn't make a federal case out of this or that eccentricity. They are
      all pretty "weird." Although the story of shooting the redcoat cahrge does kind
      of take the cake.

      I was reminded a few times of AH last night. Williams reported that Kubrick
      was convinced Barry Lyndon would be another 11-week shoot like Orange,
      and that "a good hour and a half" of it could be shot right in his own house.
      That recalled something AH said to Whitlock about the famous bird's eye-view
      shot: "We can shoot it right here in my office, Al - all we need is a few
      miniature birds..."
    • Brian Charles Dauth
      ... Agreed. I think I can recognize why people might view Kubrick as aloof. I just do not feel that way myself. ... I think so, yes. The art product has not
      Message 77 of 77 , Aug 28, 2006
        Dan writes:

        > One can make observations with the goal of having others recognize them.

        Agreed. I think I can recognize why people might view Kubrick as aloof. I
        just do not feel that way myself.

        > But is it a different movie because we have different experiences?

        I think so, yes. The art product has not changed, but the art work (which
        comes into existence when I view the art product) is going to change as my
        store of experiences changes.

        > usually feel a film as something solid, around which I might behave as a
        > fluid....

        For me, I would say that the art product is a solid around which I have a
        fluid aesthetic experience. The experience "thickens" and gains texture as
        what I bring to the viewing increases in experience, nuance and subtlety.

        > If I hate a moment in Kubrick, but like a similar moment in, say, Alan
        > Clarke or Todd Haynes, and if I can't detect any substantial difference in
        > the construction of the moment, then I need to consider the
        possibility that I'm being prejudiced.

        You are very clear here, and I see that my block has to do with the fact
        that I do not think I can say that I have ever felt that a moment in
        director X's movie was similar to one in such-and-such movie by director Y.
        I need to think more about this.

        Brian
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.