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Re: [a_film_by] Re: Words and shots (Was: A thought about BLACK NARCISSUS)

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  • Dan Sallitt
    ... I don t think anyone is looking at the ringing phone in all those silent movies. Not even the audience, really. - Dan
    Message 1 of 35 , Jun 1, 2005
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      > A shot of a crucifix does not mean what a crucifix means. It
      > means "someone is looking at a crucifix."

      I don't think anyone is looking at the ringing phone in all those silent
      movies. Not even the audience, really. - Dan
    • hotlove666
      ... Certainly not of the kind Truffaut used, but Hitchcock always used inserts as part of his suspense curves - lighters, keys - and Truffaut does too,
      Message 35 of 35 , Jun 5, 2005
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        --- In a_film_by@yahoogroups.com, "Robert Keser" <rfkeser@i...> wrote:
        > <hotlove666@y...> wrote:

        >
        > But how does this relate to Hitchcock, apart from sharing the goal
        > of inducing anxiety? Thinking literally, I can't recall any such
        > object + gesture shots in Hitchcock.
        >
        > --Robert Keser

        Certainly not of the kind Truffaut used, but Hitchcock always used
        inserts as part of his suspense curves - lighters, keys - and
        Truffaut does too, especially at the beginning, when the guy is
        racing to the airport. As I recall, time pieces get into the act as
        well. But I completely agree that the plethora of inserts calls
        attention to itself and to features of the modern world, which as far
        as I know is a new point about that film. Again, because for me every
        Truffaut film corresponds to a Godard film, look at A Married Woman
        for a stylistically different atempt at "French Antonioni."

        The other Hitchcockian element in Soft Skin is all the cutting on
        looks, which he had used for some of Antoine et Colette, but not the
        whole movie. Here it's the whole movie, and the looks are pretty
        neutral throughout, a la Hitchcock.

        Reportedly, this is the one Truffaut script - writen in an unusual 20-
        day spurt - that already contains the decoupage as it appears on
        screen, with no room for writing scenes the night before, as was his
        custom.

        I think your point about the inserts raises something interesting
        about Truffaut's "Hitchcockism": However immensely he admired
        Hitchcock, the Hitchcock style stands for something in a Truffaut
        film that it doesn't in a Hitchcock film. Hitchcock style in
        Fahrenheit 451 stands for authoritarian mind-control, for example.
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