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Re: best place to camp...

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  • cgptsnaz
    Actually I would like to get a movie based on my life and find someone to play me. Course Forest Gump kinda is the story of my life in some ways!
    Message 1 of 34 , Aug 1 4:57 PM
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      Actually I would like to get a movie based on my life and find someone to play me. Course Forest Gump kinda is the story of my life in some ways!

      --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "Joe Braun" <joe@...> wrote:
      >
      > Well this has been an interesting albeit strange thread. My tangential thought is that freedom is a relative state of mind and we all want freedom in different ways... freedom of speech, freedom of religion (or from religion?), freedom from hunger, freedom from people knowing where you are, etc. But freedom from paying for things when you live in a commerce-driven democracy? Ha ha ha... I often think of my family friends who pay several hundred dollars a day to get into Disney World. On my family vacations, I spend $50 a year for the Zion annual pass and a few bucks more for random canyoneering and backpacking permits. I can live with that. Compared to the cost of gas and dinner out for the family, it's nothing. You get road maintenance (how many times has Route 9 been repaired in the past decade?), the shuttle system, and easy access to world-celebrated scenery. Perhaps my only gripe is to pay $5 to enter a lottery that I lose.
      >
      > There are plenty of places where people can hike and camp for free without anybody else caring--BLM land, some state parks around the country, etc. But the really special spots like Zion, GC, Yosemite, etc. are ultra-regulated in comparison, and I'm perfectly fine with that as irritating as it may be at times when I can't get that Subway or Mystery permit. Imagine what access would be like if this was privately-owned land? You'd pay a lot more per day or you'd get shot at for trespassing. Or for spots like Kanarra Creek, you'd pay $10/day to the town for parking and every now and then, you might pay an extra $10 when somebody is blocking the road asking for money to cross his parcel of land. I also like knowing that when I get an overnight permit to camp in some random remote spot in Zion that it's unlikely that I'm going to bump into 50 other people who have been living there illegally for a few months. :)
      >
      > Gary -- I've admired your "alternative" lifestyle and also the fact that you have acknowledged the good and bad and you have paid the price in some respects. Still think you should write your memoirs some time; I'd volunteer as your editor. -Joe
      >
    • cgptsnaz
      I once cycled out to the North Rim s Toroweap and spent three days camping along the rim. One day, my second, a car came up, stopped long enough to roll the
      Message 34 of 34 , Aug 2 5:18 AM
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        I once cycled out to the North Rim's Toroweap and spent three days camping along the rim. One day, my second, a car came up, stopped long enough to roll the window down take a couple pictures and then left. Seemed strange to me that they had to drive slowly along a 90 mile road then got to the rim and stayed only a couple minutes and left. Took me two days each way and I stayed 3 to enjoy the solitude and scenery.

        --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "mojave_ben" <mojave_ben@...> wrote:
        >
        > Joe points out one of the dilemmas of the popular places. National parks are almost by definition popular, and they get over used, and hence quite regulated as a result. I used to hike in Colorado a lot, and RMNP was great if you could work out your itinerary well in advance and snag the back country camp spots you wanted. But for last minute or less careful planning, more spontaneity, the national forest lands and wilderness areas were far better.
        >
        > Sometimes, though, the over use has a price. There's a whole stretch of the western section of the North Rim where the Kaibab Plateau, right up to the Grand Canyon edge, is national forest. You can sleep right on the rim, no permit, no fee. But it's hardly wilderness and it's got a bunch of trash. Or you can snag the permit to go below the rim, and get much closer to pristine conditions - but you may need to do so 3 months in advance...
        >
        > Which is better depends a lot on personal circumstances and ability to plan ahead.
        >
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