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East Fork Virgin River - flash flood rates?

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  • Glenn Ray
    I noticed that the East Fork Virgin River has peaked over 1000 cds in the past couple days while the North Fork seems relatively normal (only slightly higher
    Message 1 of 7 , Jul 19, 2013
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      I noticed that the East Fork Virgin River has peaked over 1000 cds in the past couple days while the North Fork seems relatively normal (only slightly higher rates near 40 cfs.

      Is this typical?

      -Glenn "Texan flatlander" Ray
    • TomJones
      The storms hit where they hit. We had an hour of hard rain over here in Mt Carmel earlier this week, while the storms seem to have missed the North Fork
      Message 2 of 7 , Jul 20, 2013
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        The storms hit where they hit. We had an hour of hard rain over here in Mt Carmel earlier this week, while the storms seem to have missed the North Fork drainage. So, yes, this is normal. Storms often hit very specific areas, and miss areas nearby.

        Tom

        --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "Glenn Ray" <glennlray@...> wrote:
        >
        > I noticed that the East Fork Virgin River has peaked over 1000 cds in the past couple days while the North Fork seems relatively normal (only slightly higher rates near 40 cfs.
        >
        > Is this typical?
        >
        > -Glenn "Texan flatlander" Ray
        >
      • cgptsnaz
        I have noticed the East fork is constantly running heavy the last few weeks. very muddy also.
        Message 3 of 7 , Jul 20, 2013
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          I have noticed the East fork is constantly running heavy the last few weeks. very muddy also.

          --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "TomJones" <ratagonia@...> wrote:
          >
          > The storms hit where they hit. We had an hour of hard rain over here in Mt Carmel earlier this week, while the storms seem to have missed the North Fork drainage. So, yes, this is normal. Storms often hit very specific areas, and miss areas nearby.
          >
          > Tom
          >
          > --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "Glenn Ray" <glennlray@> wrote:
          > >
          > > I noticed that the East Fork Virgin River has peaked over 1000 cds in the past couple days while the North Fork seems relatively normal (only slightly higher rates near 40 cfs.
          > >
          > > Is this typical?
          > >
          > > -Glenn "Texan flatlander" Ray
          > >
          >
        • Cliff
          1000 cfs sounds high. When I check the gauge for the East Fork at Springdale, the highest I see is in the 150 to 160 cfs range. I have noticed that the
          Message 4 of 7 , Jul 20, 2013
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            1000 cfs sounds high. When I check the gauge for the East Fork at Springdale, the highest I see is in the 150 to 160 cfs range.
            I have noticed that the websites, both for the Springdale station and especially the Glendale station seem to be having issues and are not updating very well.
            Cliff


            --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "cgptsnaz" <cgptsnaz@...> wrote:
            >
            > I have noticed the East fork is constantly running heavy the last few weeks. very muddy also.
            >
            > --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "TomJones" <ratagonia@> wrote:
            > >
            > > The storms hit where they hit. We had an hour of hard rain over here in Mt Carmel earlier this week, while the storms seem to have missed the North Fork drainage. So, yes, this is normal. Storms often hit very specific areas, and miss areas nearby.
            > >
            > > Tom
            > >
            > > --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "Glenn Ray" <glennlray@> wrote:
            > > >
            > > > I noticed that the East Fork Virgin River has peaked over 1000 cds in the past couple days while the North Fork seems relatively normal (only slightly higher rates near 40 cfs.
            > > >
            > > > Is this typical?
            > > >
            > > > -Glenn "Texan flatlander" Ray
            > > >
            > >
            >
          • Glenn Ray
            Does seem high...but it s hit over 1000 cfs twice in 10 days:
            Message 5 of 7 , Jul 20, 2013
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              Does seem high...but it's hit over 1000 cfs twice in 10 days:

              http://nwis.waterdata.usgs.gov/ut/nwis/uv?cb_00065=on&cb_00060=on&format=gif_default&period=10&begin_date=2013-07-13&end_date=2013-07-20&site_no=09404900

              Living in a large coastal floodplain (Houston), I don't see the kind of local flash flooding like this. When we have heavy local rains, it just piles up slowly and sticks around longer.

              --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "Cliff" <kol84b@...> wrote:
              >
              > 1000 cfs sounds high. When I check the gauge for the East Fork at Springdale, the highest I see is in the 150 to 160 cfs range.
              > I have noticed that the websites, both for the Springdale station and especially the Glendale station seem to be having issues and are not updating very well.
              > Cliff
              >
              >
              > --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "cgptsnaz" <cgptsnaz@> wrote:
              > >
              > > I have noticed the East fork is constantly running heavy the last few weeks. very muddy also.
              > >
              > > --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "TomJones" <ratagonia@> wrote:
              > > >
              > > > The storms hit where they hit. We had an hour of hard rain over here in Mt Carmel earlier this week, while the storms seem to have missed the North Fork drainage. So, yes, this is normal. Storms often hit very specific areas, and miss areas nearby.
              > > >
              > > > Tom
              > > >
              > > > --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "Glenn Ray" <glennlray@> wrote:
              > > > >
              > > > > I noticed that the East Fork Virgin River has peaked over 1000 cds in the past couple days while the North Fork seems relatively normal (only slightly higher rates near 40 cfs.
              > > > >
              > > > > Is this typical?
              > > > >
              > > > > -Glenn "Texan flatlander" Ray
              > > > >
              > > >
              > >
              >
            • tanya_o0o
              The road leading to Red Hollow was a river the other day. It was great! Yes, kids have been tubing in the North Fork and they are not impressed with the water
              Message 6 of 7 , Jul 21, 2013
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                The road leading to Red Hollow was a river the other day. It was great! Yes, kids have been tubing in the North Fork and they are not impressed with the water level. Their "butts are bruised!" ;)

                --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "TomJones" <ratagonia@...> wrote:
                >
                > The storms hit where they hit. We had an hour of hard rain over here in Mt Carmel earlier this week, while the storms seem to have missed the North Fork drainage. So, yes, this is normal. Storms often hit very specific areas, and miss areas nearby.
                >
                > Tom
                >
                > --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "Glenn Ray" <glennlray@> wrote:
                > >
                > > I noticed that the East Fork Virgin River has peaked over 1000 cds in the past couple days while the North Fork seems relatively normal (only slightly higher rates near 40 cfs.
                > >
                > > Is this typical?
                > >
                > > -Glenn "Texan flatlander" Ray
                > >
                >
              • TomJones
                Here s the gauge at Glendale: http://nwis.waterdata.usgs.gov/ut/nwis/uv?site_no=09404450 So at Glendale, the peaks were 300, then 500 cfs. AFTER Parunaweap
                Message 7 of 7 , Jul 24, 2013
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                  Here's the gauge at Glendale:

                  http://nwis.waterdata.usgs.gov/ut/nwis/uv?site_no=09404450

                  So at Glendale, the peaks were 300, then 500 cfs. AFTER Parunaweap Canyon, the peaks were almost 2000 and then 500 cfs. So clearly, the first storm picked up a lot below Glendale, and the second did not.

                  Tom

                  --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "Glenn Ray" <glennlray@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Does seem high...but it's hit over 1000 cfs twice in 10 days:
                  >
                  > http://nwis.waterdata.usgs.gov/ut/nwis/uv?cb_00065=on&cb_00060=on&format=gif_default&period=10&begin_date=2013-07-13&end_date=2013-07-20&site_no=09404900
                  >
                  > Living in a large coastal floodplain (Houston), I don't see the kind of local flash flooding like this. When we have heavy local rains, it just piles up slowly and sticks around longer.
                  >
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