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Re: What's In Your Pack? - Overnight Backpacking Edition

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  • Glenn Ray
    Jeff, thanks for the first reply! Just seeing your equipment has provided a couple of hours of internet-browsing window-shopping already. I think I ll have
    Message 1 of 14 , Dec 18, 2012
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      Jeff, thanks for the first reply! Just seeing your equipment has provided a couple of hours of internet-browsing window-shopping already. I think I'll have to up my budget a bit in order to get quality, light-weight equipment.

      Any others want to contribute to the discussion?

      PS How do you set up your cooking with the esbits? Do you have a cooking setup (i.e., folding stove or can) or just dig a hole and prop up?


      --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "jeff" wrote:

      I tend to go lightweight in part because I'm flying in to Utah or Colorado and prefer not to haul any more than I have to both on and off the trail.

      Pack: REI Flash 50
      Tent: Tarptent Rainbow or if rain's expected, Big Agnes Fly Creek1
      Bag: Mt Hardware 800 down 32 degrees or for colder conditions, Lafuma 950 down 15 degrees.
      Pad: InsulMat (air mattress)

      Stove: none, I use esbit tablets.

      Most of my gear i get on line. Steap and Cheap is a dependable site for bargains.


      -- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "Glenn Ray" wrote:

      After spending nine wonderful days in Utah (at Zion and Bryce, mostly) and hiking about 60 miles total, I'm now getting past reflection and looking forward to my next trek.

      Before proceeding, I want to be better equipped with my backpack and its contents. Although I never felt under-prepared for my hikes, I'm sure I could do better in terms of weight and quality. And, I would like to get back into backpacking again (even if just 1-2 days trips), so a search for a good sleeping bag and shelter is in order.

      I browsed through the messages in the group here. While there is some good advice posted, much of it is outdated (ex. many links have gone to the netherweb). And rather than ask, "what should I buy," I would like to hear what you all equip yourselves with.

      For the sake of limiting this discussion, let's assume this won't involve canyoneering or rappelling, but would involve backpacking for two days/one night. If this thread goes well, we could start others strictly for day hikes or canyoneering.

      So, what's in your pack? :-)

      -Glenn
    • Glenn Ray
      I don t want this thread to die without hearing some more feedback (cough...Ben...cough...Bo...cough...Joe). Here s Version 1.0 of my overnight backpacking
      Message 2 of 14 , Jan 29, 2013
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        I don't want this thread to die without hearing some more feedback (cough...Ben...cough...Bo...cough...Joe). Here's Version 1.0 of my overnight backpacking setup:

        Pack: Kelty Redtail (30 liter)
        Tent: REI Roadster (solo) or Big Agnes Slater UL2
        Bag: Western Mountaineering Ultralite (20º) or Big Agnes Pitchpine (40º)
        Pad: ThermaRest NeoAir Xlite
        Stove: Olicamp Kinetic & GSI Halulite Minimalist (Esbits sometimes)

        I can lash either tent externally on the backpack bottom and that frees up space for everything else. I'm not anywhere near ultralight yet; my base weight is around 25 lbs, not including food/water.

        P.S. Thanks for the steepandcheap reference. I've gotten some good extra gear from them over the past couple of weeks.


        --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "Glenn Ray" wrote:
        >
        > Jeff, thanks for the first reply! Just seeing your equipment has provided a couple of hours of internet-browsing window-shopping already. I think I'll have to up my budget a bit in order to get quality, light-weight equipment.
        >
        > Any others want to contribute to the discussion?
        >
        > PS How do you set up your cooking with the esbits? Do you have a cooking setup (i.e., folding stove or can) or just dig a hole and prop up?
        >
        >
        > --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "jeff" wrote:
        >
        > I tend to go lightweight in part because I'm flying in to Utah or Colorado and prefer not to haul any more than I have to both on and off the trail.
        >
        > Pack: REI Flash 50
        > Tent: Tarptent Rainbow or if rain's expected, Big Agnes Fly Creek1
        > Bag: Mt Hardware 800 down 32 degrees or for colder conditions, Lafuma 950 down 15 degrees.
        > Pad: InsulMat (air mattress)
        >
        > Stove: none, I use esbit tablets.
        >
        > Most of my gear i get on line. Steap and Cheap is a dependable site for bargains.
        >
        >
        > -- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "Glenn Ray" wrote:
        >
        > After spending nine wonderful days in Utah (at Zion and Bryce, mostly) and hiking about 60 miles total, I'm now getting past reflection and looking forward to my next trek.
        >
        > Before proceeding, I want to be better equipped with my backpack and its contents. Although I never felt under-prepared for my hikes, I'm sure I could do better in terms of weight and quality. And, I would like to get back into backpacking again (even if just 1-2 days trips), so a search for a good sleeping bag and shelter is in order.
        >
        > I browsed through the messages in the group here. While there is some good advice posted, much of it is outdated (ex. many links have gone to the netherweb). And rather than ask, "what should I buy," I would like to hear what you all equip yourselves with.
        >
        > For the sake of limiting this discussion, let's assume this won't involve canyoneering or rappelling, but would involve backpacking for two days/one night. If this thread goes well, we could start others strictly for day hikes or canyoneering.
        >
        > So, what's in your pack? :-)
        >
        > -Glenn
        >
      • cgptsnaz
        Pack: Kelty 45 liter pack Tent: Mtn Hard Wear Meridean 2 Bag: REI Solarpod 20 degree Pad: Ensolite pad (34 years old) Stove: MSR Pocketrocket and MSR 1 Qt pot
        Message 3 of 14 , Jan 29, 2013
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          Pack: Kelty 45 liter pack
          Tent: Mtn Hard Wear Meridean 2
          Bag: REI Solarpod 20 degree
          Pad: Ensolite pad (34 years old)
          Stove: MSR Pocketrocket and MSR 1 Qt pot


          --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "Glenn Ray" wrote:
          >
          > I don't want this thread to die without hearing some more feedback (cough...Ben...cough...Bo...cough...Joe). Here's Version 1.0 of my overnight backpacking setup:
          >
          > Pack: Kelty Redtail (30 liter)
          > Tent: REI Roadster (solo) or Big Agnes Slater UL2
          > Bag: Western Mountaineering Ultralite (20º) or Big Agnes Pitchpine (40º)
          > Pad: ThermaRest NeoAir Xlite
          > Stove: Olicamp Kinetic & GSI Halulite Minimalist (Esbits sometimes)
          >
          > I can lash either tent externally on the backpack bottom and that frees up space for everything else. I'm not anywhere near ultralight yet; my base weight is around 25 lbs, not including food/water.
          >
          > P.S. Thanks for the steepandcheap reference. I've gotten some good extra gear from them over the past couple of weeks.
          >
          >
          > --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "Glenn Ray" wrote:
          > >
          > > Jeff, thanks for the first reply! Just seeing your equipment has provided a couple of hours of internet-browsing window-shopping already. I think I'll have to up my budget a bit in order to get quality, light-weight equipment.
          > >
          > > Any others want to contribute to the discussion?
          > >
          > > PS How do you set up your cooking with the esbits? Do you have a cooking setup (i.e., folding stove or can) or just dig a hole and prop up?
          > >
          > >
          > > --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "jeff" wrote:
          > >
          > > I tend to go lightweight in part because I'm flying in to Utah or Colorado and prefer not to haul any more than I have to both on and off the trail.
          > >
          > > Pack: REI Flash 50
          > > Tent: Tarptent Rainbow or if rain's expected, Big Agnes Fly Creek1
          > > Bag: Mt Hardware 800 down 32 degrees or for colder conditions, Lafuma 950 down 15 degrees.
          > > Pad: InsulMat (air mattress)
          > >
          > > Stove: none, I use esbit tablets.
          > >
          > > Most of my gear i get on line. Steap and Cheap is a dependable site for bargains.
          > >
          > >
          > > -- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "Glenn Ray" wrote:
          > >
          > > After spending nine wonderful days in Utah (at Zion and Bryce, mostly) and hiking about 60 miles total, I'm now getting past reflection and looking forward to my next trek.
          > >
          > > Before proceeding, I want to be better equipped with my backpack and its contents. Although I never felt under-prepared for my hikes, I'm sure I could do better in terms of weight and quality. And, I would like to get back into backpacking again (even if just 1-2 days trips), so a search for a good sleeping bag and shelter is in order.
          > >
          > > I browsed through the messages in the group here. While there is some good advice posted, much of it is outdated (ex. many links have gone to the netherweb). And rather than ask, "what should I buy," I would like to hear what you all equip yourselves with.
          > >
          > > For the sake of limiting this discussion, let's assume this won't involve canyoneering or rappelling, but would involve backpacking for two days/one night. If this thread goes well, we could start others strictly for day hikes or canyoneering.
          > >
          > > So, what's in your pack? :-)
          > >
          > > -Glenn
          > >
          >
        • tanya_o0o
          If you don t get more info you can always call Bo at the Desert Rat! The man LOVES to talk! He will give you advise until you yell GIVE! ...
          Message 4 of 14 , Jan 29, 2013
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            If you don't get more info you can always call Bo at the Desert Rat!  The man LOVES to talk!  He will give you advise until you yell GIVE!


            --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "Glenn Ray" wrote:
            >
            > I don't want this thread to die without hearing some more feedback (cough...Ben...cough...Bo...cough...Joe). Here's Version 1.0 of my overnight backpacking setup:
            >
            > Pack: Kelty Redtail (30 liter)
            > Tent: REI Roadster (solo) or Big Agnes Slater UL2
            > Bag: Western Mountaineering Ultralite (20º) or Big Agnes Pitchpine (40º)
            > Pad: ThermaRest NeoAir Xlite
            > Stove: Olicamp Kinetic & GSI Halulite Minimalist (Esbits sometimes)
            >
            > I can lash either tent externally on the backpack bottom and that frees up space for everything else. I'm not anywhere near ultralight yet; my base weight is around 25 lbs, not including food/water.
            >
            > P.S. Thanks for the steepandcheap reference. I've gotten some good extra gear from them over the past couple of weeks.
            >
            >
            > --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "Glenn Ray" wrote:
            > >
            > > Jeff, thanks for the first reply! Just seeing your equipment has provided a couple of hours of internet-browsing window-shopping already. I think I'll have to up my budget a bit in order to get quality, light-weight equipment.
            > >
            > > Any others want to contribute to the discussion?
            > >
            > > PS How do you set up your cooking with the esbits? Do you have a cooking setup (i.e., folding stove or can) or just dig a hole and prop up?
            > >
            > >
            > > --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "jeff" wrote:
            > >
            > > I tend to go lightweight in part because I'm flying in to Utah or Colorado and prefer not to haul any more than I have to both on and off the trail.
            > >
            > > Pack: REI Flash 50
            > > Tent: Tarptent Rainbow or if rain's expected, Big Agnes Fly Creek1
            > > Bag: Mt Hardware 800 down 32 degrees or for colder conditions, Lafuma 950 down 15 degrees.
            > > Pad: InsulMat (air mattress)
            > >
            > > Stove: none, I use esbit tablets.
            > >
            > > Most of my gear i get on line. Steap and Cheap is a dependable site for bargains.
            > >
            > >
            > > -- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "Glenn Ray" wrote:
            > >
            > > After spending nine wonderful days in Utah (at Zion and Bryce, mostly) and hiking about 60 miles total, I'm now getting past reflection and looking forward to my next trek.
            > >
            > > Before proceeding, I want to be better equipped with my backpack and its contents. Although I never felt under-prepared for my hikes, I'm sure I could do better in terms of weight and quality. And, I would like to get back into backpacking again (even if just 1-2 days trips), so a search for a good sleeping bag and shelter is in order.
            > >
            > > I browsed through the messages in the group here. While there is some good advice posted, much of it is outdated (ex. many links have gone to the netherweb). And rather than ask, "what should I buy," I would like to hear what you all equip yourselves with.
            > >
            > > For the sake of limiting this discussion, let's assume this won't involve canyoneering or rappelling, but would involve backpacking for two days/one night. If this thread goes well, we could start others strictly for day hikes or canyoneering.
            > >
            > > So, what's in your pack? :-)
            > >
            > > -Glenn
            > >
            >
          • Glenn Ray
            Hey, I know that! I really enjoyed meeting Bo last November. But, heck...what do YOU usually pack? :)
            Message 5 of 14 , Jan 29, 2013
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              Hey, I know that! I really enjoyed meeting Bo last November.

              But, heck...what do YOU usually pack? :)

              --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, tanya_o0o wrote:
              >
              > If you don't get more info you can always call Bo at the Desert Rat!
              > The man LOVES to talk! He will give you advise until you yell GIVE!
              >
              >
              > --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "Glenn Ray" wrote:
              > >
              > > I don't want this thread to die without hearing some more feedback
              > (cough...Ben...cough...Bo...cough...Joe). Here's Version 1.0 of my
              > overnight backpacking setup:
              > >
              > > Pack: Kelty Redtail (30 liter)
              > > Tent: REI Roadster (solo) or Big Agnes Slater UL2
              > > Bag: Western Mountaineering Ultralite (20º) or Big Agnes Pitchpine
              > (40º)
              > > Pad: ThermaRest NeoAir Xlite
              > > Stove: Olicamp Kinetic & GSI Halulite Minimalist (Esbits sometimes)
              > >
              > > I can lash either tent externally on the backpack bottom and that
              > frees up space for everything else. I'm not anywhere near ultralight
              > yet; my base weight is around 25 lbs, not including food/water.
              > >
              > > P.S. Thanks for the steepandcheap reference. I've gotten some good
              > extra gear from them over the past couple of weeks.
              > >
              > >
              > > --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "Glenn Ray" wrote:
              > > >
              > > > Jeff, thanks for the first reply! Just seeing your equipment has
              > provided a couple of hours of internet-browsing window-shopping already.
              > I think I'll have to up my budget a bit in order to get quality,
              > light-weight equipment.
              > > >
              > > > Any others want to contribute to the discussion?
              > > >
              > > > PS How do you set up your cooking with the esbits? Do you have a
              > cooking setup (i.e., folding stove or can) or just dig a hole and prop
              > up?
              > > >
              > > >
              > > > --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "jeff" wrote:
              > > >
              > > > I tend to go lightweight in part because I'm flying in to Utah or
              > Colorado and prefer not to haul any more than I have to both on and off
              > the trail.
              > > >
              > > > Pack: REI Flash 50
              > > > Tent: Tarptent Rainbow or if rain's expected, Big Agnes Fly Creek1
              > > > Bag: Mt Hardware 800 down 32 degrees or for colder conditions,
              > Lafuma 950 down 15 degrees.
              > > > Pad: InsulMat (air mattress)
              > > >
              > > > Stove: none, I use esbit tablets.
              > > >
              > > > Most of my gear i get on line. Steap and Cheap is a dependable
              > site for bargains.
              > > >
              > > >
              > > > -- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "Glenn Ray"
              > wrote:
              > > >
              > > > After spending nine wonderful days in Utah (at Zion and Bryce,
              > mostly) and hiking about 60 miles total, I'm now getting past reflection
              > and looking forward to my next trek.
              > > >
              > > > Before proceeding, I want to be better equipped with my backpack
              > and its contents. Although I never felt under-prepared for my hikes,
              > I'm sure I could do better in terms of weight and quality. And, I would
              > like to get back into backpacking again (even if just 1-2 days trips),
              > so a search for a good sleeping bag and shelter is in order.
              > > >
              > > > I browsed through the messages in the group here. While there is
              > some good advice posted, much of it is outdated (ex. many links have
              > gone to the netherweb). And rather than ask, "what should I buy," I
              > would like to hear what you all equip yourselves with.
              > > >
              > > > For the sake of limiting this discussion, let's assume this won't
              > involve canyoneering or rappelling, but would involve backpacking for
              > two days/one night. If this thread goes well, we could start others
              > strictly for day hikes or canyoneering.
              > > >
              > > > So, what's in your pack? :-)
              > > >
              > > > -Glenn
              > > >
              > >
              >
            • tanya_o0o
              Me? pack? Why - I have Bo. ;) A cute story though. My daughter - the blonde on the front of our book went and hiked the Virgin River Rim Trail with us one day
              Message 6 of 14 , Jan 29, 2013
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                Me? pack? Why - I have Bo. ;)

                A cute story though. My daughter - the blonde on the front of our book went and hiked the Virgin River Rim Trail with us one day - the one on Cedar Mountain (SR14) and I had told her the most important thing to bring hiking is TP. So we stop for a break and she opens her big (for her size) backpack and pulls out the only thing in it. An double Xtra wide roll of Charmin. lol

                I taught her well.



                --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "Glenn Ray" wrote:
                >
                > Hey, I know that! I really enjoyed meeting Bo last November.
                >
                > But, heck...what do YOU usually pack? :)
                >
                > --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, tanya_o0o wrote:
                > >
                > > If you don't get more info you can always call Bo at the Desert Rat!
                > > The man LOVES to talk! He will give you advise until you yell GIVE!
                > >
                > >
                > > --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "Glenn Ray" wrote:
                > > >
                > > > I don't want this thread to die without hearing some more feedback
                > > (cough...Ben...cough...Bo...cough...Joe). Here's Version 1.0 of my
                > > overnight backpacking setup:
                > > >
                > > > Pack: Kelty Redtail (30 liter)
                > > > Tent: REI Roadster (solo) or Big Agnes Slater UL2
                > > > Bag: Western Mountaineering Ultralite (20º) or Big Agnes Pitchpine
                > > (40º)
                > > > Pad: ThermaRest NeoAir Xlite
                > > > Stove: Olicamp Kinetic & GSI Halulite Minimalist (Esbits sometimes)
                > > >
                > > > I can lash either tent externally on the backpack bottom and that
                > > frees up space for everything else. I'm not anywhere near ultralight
                > > yet; my base weight is around 25 lbs, not including food/water.
                > > >
                > > > P.S. Thanks for the steepandcheap reference. I've gotten some good
                > > extra gear from them over the past couple of weeks.
                > > >
                > > >
                > > > --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "Glenn Ray" wrote:
                > > > >
                > > > > Jeff, thanks for the first reply! Just seeing your equipment has
                > > provided a couple of hours of internet-browsing window-shopping already.
                > > I think I'll have to up my budget a bit in order to get quality,
                > > light-weight equipment.
                > > > >
                > > > > Any others want to contribute to the discussion?
                > > > >
                > > > > PS How do you set up your cooking with the esbits? Do you have a
                > > cooking setup (i.e., folding stove or can) or just dig a hole and prop
                > > up?
                > > > >
                > > > >
                > > > > --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "jeff" wrote:
                > > > >
                > > > > I tend to go lightweight in part because I'm flying in to Utah or
                > > Colorado and prefer not to haul any more than I have to both on and off
                > > the trail.
                > > > >
                > > > > Pack: REI Flash 50
                > > > > Tent: Tarptent Rainbow or if rain's expected, Big Agnes Fly Creek1
                > > > > Bag: Mt Hardware 800 down 32 degrees or for colder conditions,
                > > Lafuma 950 down 15 degrees.
                > > > > Pad: InsulMat (air mattress)
                > > > >
                > > > > Stove: none, I use esbit tablets.
                > > > >
                > > > > Most of my gear i get on line. Steap and Cheap is a dependable
                > > site for bargains.
                > > > >
                > > > >
                > > > > -- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "Glenn Ray"
                > > wrote:
                > > > >
                > > > > After spending nine wonderful days in Utah (at Zion and Bryce,
                > > mostly) and hiking about 60 miles total, I'm now getting past reflection
                > > and looking forward to my next trek.
                > > > >
                > > > > Before proceeding, I want to be better equipped with my backpack
                > > and its contents. Although I never felt under-prepared for my hikes,
                > > I'm sure I could do better in terms of weight and quality. And, I would
                > > like to get back into backpacking again (even if just 1-2 days trips),
                > > so a search for a good sleeping bag and shelter is in order.
                > > > >
                > > > > I browsed through the messages in the group here. While there is
                > > some good advice posted, much of it is outdated (ex. many links have
                > > gone to the netherweb). And rather than ask, "what should I buy," I
                > > would like to hear what you all equip yourselves with.
                > > > >
                > > > > For the sake of limiting this discussion, let's assume this won't
                > > involve canyoneering or rappelling, but would involve backpacking for
                > > two days/one night. If this thread goes well, we could start others
                > > strictly for day hikes or canyoneering.
                > > > >
                > > > > So, what's in your pack? :-)
                > > > >
                > > > > -Glenn
                > > > >
                > > >
                > >
                >
              • jeff
                My math might be off, but it would appear your five items add up to about 8 lbs. Perhaps, 9, if you throw in some fuel. So what else are you hauling that
                Message 7 of 14 , Jan 30, 2013
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                  My math might be off, but it would appear your five items add up to about 8 lbs. Perhaps, 9, if you throw in some fuel. So what else are you hauling that would increase your base load up to 25 lbs. For a night or two I wouldn't think you'd need much in additional clothing.

                  Tanya and Bo's book probably doesn't weigh a pound. Photography equipment? That could add up, but many get by with a few ounces of point and shoot. Even basic hygiene needs shouldn't amount to much.
                  Traveler size items such as toothbrush and toothpaste would only add an ounce or two to your pack wt. You must be lading on a luxury item or two. jeff

                  --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "Glenn Ray" wrote:
                  >
                  > I don't want this thread to die without hearing some more feedback (cough...Ben...cough...Bo...cough...Joe). Here's Version 1.0 of my overnight backpacking setup:
                  >
                  > Pack: Kelty Redtail (30 liter)
                  > Tent: REI Roadster (solo) or Big Agnes Slater UL2
                  > Bag: Western Mountaineering Ultralite (20º) or Big Agnes Pitchpine (40º)
                  > Pad: ThermaRest NeoAir Xlite
                  > Stove: Olicamp Kinetic & GSI Halulite Minimalist (Esbits sometimes)
                  >
                  > I can lash either tent externally on the backpack bottom and that frees up space for everything else. I'm not anywhere near ultralight yet; my base weight is around 25 lbs, not including food/water.
                  >
                  > P.S. Thanks for the steepandcheap reference. I've gotten some good extra gear from them over the past couple of weeks.
                  >
                  >
                  >
                • tanya_o0o
                  I always took things out of packages and put them into little baggies. That way I had the baggies to use when empty too. TP was taken off the roll to save
                  Message 8 of 14 , Jan 30, 2013
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                    I always took things out of packages and put them into little baggies.
                    That way I had the baggies to use when empty too. TP was taken off the
                    roll to save space, etc... Make sure your pack fits you correctly and
                    that you distribute the weight for comfort.

                    Which hike are you headed out to do? Where you are going and what time
                    of year dictates much of what you need to take. You might be able to
                    take empty collapsable containers and a water filter if there is water.
                    What does your tent and bag and pad weigh?

                    Looking at your list:
                    > > Pack: Kelty Redtail (30 liter)
                    > > Tent: REI Roadster (solo) or Big Agnes Slater UL2
                    > > Bag: Western Mountaineering Ultralite (20º) or Big Agnes
                    Pitchpine (40º)
                    > > Pad: ThermaRest NeoAir Xlite
                    > > Stove: Olicamp Kinetic & GSI Halulite Minimalist (Esbits sometimes)
                    > >
                    > > I can lash either tent externally on the backpack bottom and that
                    frees up space for everything else. I'm not anywhere near ultralight
                    yet; my base weight is around 25 lbs, not including food/water.


                    --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "jeff" wrote:
                    >
                    > My math might be off, but it would appear your five items add up to
                    about 8 lbs. Perhaps, 9, if you throw in some fuel. So what else are
                    you hauling that would increase your base load up to 25 lbs. For a
                    night or two I wouldn't think you'd need much in additional clothing.
                    >
                    > Tanya and Bo's book probably doesn't weigh a pound. Photography
                    equipment? That could add up, but many get by with a few ounces of point
                    and shoot. Even basic hygiene needs shouldn't amount to much.
                    > Traveler size items such as toothbrush and toothpaste would only add
                    an ounce or two to your pack wt. You must be lading on a luxury item or
                    two. jeff
                    >
                    > --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "Glenn Ray" wrote:
                    > >
                    > > I don't want this thread to die without hearing some more feedback
                    (cough...Ben...cough...Bo...cough...Joe). Here's Version 1.0 of my
                    overnight backpacking setup:
                    > >
                    > > Pack: Kelty Redtail (30 liter)
                    > > Tent: REI Roadster (solo) or Big Agnes Slater UL2
                    > > Bag: Western Mountaineering Ultralite (20º) or Big Agnes
                    Pitchpine (40º)
                    > > Pad: ThermaRest NeoAir Xlite
                    > > Stove: Olicamp Kinetic & GSI Halulite Minimalist (Esbits sometimes)
                    > >
                    > > I can lash either tent externally on the backpack bottom and that
                    frees up space for everything else. I'm not anywhere near ultralight
                    yet; my base weight is around 25 lbs, not including food/water.
                    > >
                    > > P.S. Thanks for the steepandcheap reference. I've gotten some good
                    extra gear from them over the past couple of weeks.
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    >
                  • Joe Braun
                    Fun topic! I m not in front of my gear at the moment, so I don t have my brand/model names memorized, but over the years, I keep switching between too much
                    Message 9 of 14 , Jan 31, 2013
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                      Fun topic! I'm not in front of my gear at the moment, so I don't have my brand/model names memorized, but over the years, I keep switching between too much stuff/weight for luxury and being fed up with weight and going minimalist. I'm currently in a minimalist phase and try to stuff all my overnight stuff in a traditional day pack.

                      Pack: REI Pinnacle 50 climbing pack--nothing too special, but it has a rear pouch to store frequently-used stuff separate from the main compartment and the side pouch is solid fabric to hold a tripod (I hate the cheap webbing material on the sides of most packs.)

                      Sleeping bag: an old EMS 40+ bag. Would love to get a newer smaller one, but they're expensive.

                      Tent substitute: REI Minimalist Bivy. Ditching the tent saves a lot of weight and space. Sleeping in a little cocoon is a bit claustrophobic, but I kinda like it now.

                      Stove: MSR Whisperlight w/little titanium pan. But if I want to save weight, I'll leave it behind and just eat dry or cold stuff. Saves a lot of weight and makes you really appreciate good food after your hike.

                      Other stuff: thermal bottoms and ski face mask (very nice when cold at night), lighter, whistle, small first aid kit, headlamp, GPS, MSR sweetwater filter.

                      The majority of my weight always seems to be water on 2-3 day hikes with no reliable water source. And my camera gear tends to add up as well.


                      --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "Glenn Ray" wrote:
                      >
                      > I don't want this thread to die without hearing some more feedback (cough...Ben...cough...Bo...cough...Joe). Here's Version 1.0 of my overnight backpacking setup:
                      >
                      > Pack: Kelty Redtail (30 liter)
                      > Tent: REI Roadster (solo) or Big Agnes Slater UL2
                      > Bag: Western Mountaineering Ultralite (20º) or Big Agnes Pitchpine (40º)
                      > Pad: ThermaRest NeoAir Xlite
                      > Stove: Olicamp Kinetic & GSI Halulite Minimalist (Esbits sometimes)
                      >
                      > I can lash either tent externally on the backpack bottom and that frees up space for everything else. I'm not anywhere near ultralight yet; my base weight is around 25 lbs, not including food/water.
                      >
                      > P.S. Thanks for the steepandcheap reference. I've gotten some good extra gear from them over the past couple of weeks.
                      >
                      >
                      > --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "Glenn Ray" wrote:
                      > >
                      > > Jeff, thanks for the first reply! Just seeing your equipment has provided a couple of hours of internet-browsing window-shopping already. I think I'll have to up my budget a bit in order to get quality, light-weight equipment.
                      > >
                      > > Any others want to contribute to the discussion?
                      > >
                      > > PS How do you set up your cooking with the esbits? Do you have a cooking setup (i.e., folding stove or can) or just dig a hole and prop up?
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "jeff" wrote:
                      > >
                      > > I tend to go lightweight in part because I'm flying in to Utah or Colorado and prefer not to haul any more than I have to both on and off the trail.
                      > >
                      > > Pack: REI Flash 50
                      > > Tent: Tarptent Rainbow or if rain's expected, Big Agnes Fly Creek1
                      > > Bag: Mt Hardware 800 down 32 degrees or for colder conditions, Lafuma 950 down 15 degrees.
                      > > Pad: InsulMat (air mattress)
                      > >
                      > > Stove: none, I use esbit tablets.
                      > >
                      > > Most of my gear i get on line. Steap and Cheap is a dependable site for bargains.
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > -- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "Glenn Ray" wrote:
                      > >
                      > > After spending nine wonderful days in Utah (at Zion and Bryce, mostly) and hiking about 60 miles total, I'm now getting past reflection and looking forward to my next trek.
                      > >
                      > > Before proceeding, I want to be better equipped with my backpack and its contents. Although I never felt under-prepared for my hikes, I'm sure I could do better in terms of weight and quality. And, I would like to get back into backpacking again (even if just 1-2 days trips), so a search for a good sleeping bag and shelter is in order.
                      > >
                      > > I browsed through the messages in the group here. While there is some good advice posted, much of it is outdated (ex. many links have gone to the netherweb). And rather than ask, "what should I buy," I would like to hear what you all equip yourselves with.
                      > >
                      > > For the sake of limiting this discussion, let's assume this won't involve canyoneering or rappelling, but would involve backpacking for two days/one night. If this thread goes well, we could start others strictly for day hikes or canyoneering.
                      > >
                      > > So, what's in your pack? :-)
                      > >
                      > > -Glenn
                      > >
                      >
                    • Glenn Ray
                      I m a professional Excel Guru/Geek so of course I had to start putting everything in a workbook! [:-B] My brother recently loaned me his digital scale and
                      Message 10 of 14 , Jan 31, 2013
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                        I'm a professional Excel Guru/Geek so of course I had to start putting everything in a workbook! :-B   My brother recently loaned me his digital scale and I weighed EVERYTHING individually.  I can estimate my base weight and full pack weight now.

                        Here's my setup for an upcoming weekend hike on the Lone Star Trail:
                        Pack: 25 oz (Kelty)
                        Tent: 58 oz (REI)
                        Bag: 19 oz (Big Agnes)
                        Pad: 14 oz (ThermaRest + inflating bag)
                        Stove: 15 oz (GSI Minimalist + Olicamp + small Jetboil fuel)
                        Total: 131 oz - 8 lb., 3 oz.

                        My full pack - minus food and water - will weigh just over 21 lbs.  Over 3 lbs. is camera equipment (GoPro plus heavy monopod).  Starting weight with food and 3 liters of water is about 28.4 lbs.

                        If I used my Esbit setup and minimized the GoPro, I think I could get the base weight around 17.5 lbs.

                        --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "jeff" wrote:
                        >
                        > My math might be off, but it would appear your five items add up to about 8 lbs. Perhaps, 9, if you throw in some fuel. So what else are you hauling that would increase your base load up to 25 lbs. For a night or two I wouldn't think you'd need much in additional clothing.
                        >
                        > Tanya and Bo's book probably doesn't weigh a pound. Photography equipment? That could add up, but many get by with a few ounces of point and shoot. Even basic hygiene needs shouldn't amount to much.
                        > Traveler size items such as toothbrush and toothpaste would only add an ounce or two to your pack wt. You must be lading on a luxury item or two. jeff
                        >
                        > --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "Glenn Ray" wrote:
                        > >
                        > > I don't want this thread to die without hearing some more feedback (cough...Ben...cough...Bo...cough...Joe). Here's Version 1.0 of my overnight backpacking setup:
                        > >
                        > > Pack: Kelty Redtail (30 liter)
                        > > Tent: REI Roadster (solo) or Big Agnes Slater UL2
                        > > Bag: Western Mountaineering Ultralite (20º) or Big Agnes Pitchpine (40º)
                        > > Pad: ThermaRest NeoAir Xlite
                        > > Stove: Olicamp Kinetic & GSI Halulite Minimalist (Esbits sometimes)
                        > >
                        > > I can lash either tent externally on the backpack bottom and that frees up space for everything else. I'm not anywhere near ultralight yet; my base weight is around 25 lbs, not including food/water.
                        > >
                        > > P.S. Thanks for the steepandcheap reference. I've gotten some good extra gear from them over the past couple of weeks.
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        >
                      • Bo
                        If you re looking to make an investment in new gear, condsider looking at Six Moons Designs packs and tents and shelters,Thermarest X-Therm pads, and Western
                        Message 11 of 14 , Jan 31, 2013
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                          If you're looking to make an investment in new gear, condsider looking at Six Moons Designs packs and tents and shelters,Thermarest X-Therm pads, and Western Mountaineering bags. Just these four items alone constitute a large percentage of the weight and mass carried by backpackers. Often times you can reduce the weight you'll be carrying by 50% or more with careful choice of ultralight gear.

                          --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "Glenn Ray" wrote:
                          >
                          > After spending nine wonderful days in Utah (at Zion and Bryce, mostly) and hiking about 60 miles total, I'm now getting past reflection and looking forward to my next trek.
                          >
                          > Before proceeding, I want to be better equipped with my backpack and its contents. Although I never felt under-prepared for my hikes, I'm sure I could do better in terms of weight and quality. And, I would like to get back into backpacking again (even if just 1-2 days trips), so a search for a good sleeping bag and shelter is in order.
                          >
                          > I browsed through the messages in the group here. While there is some good advice posted, much of it is outdated (ex. many links have gone to the netherweb). And rather than ask, "what should I buy," I would like to hear what you all equip yourselves with.
                          >
                          > For the sake of limiting this discussion, let's assume this won't involve canyoneering or rappelling, but would involve backpacking for two days/one night. If this thread goes well, we could start others strictly for day hikes or canyoneering.
                          >
                          > So, what's in your pack? :-)
                          >
                          > -Glenn
                          >
                        • Glenn Ray
                          Well, regarding your recommended equipment, I m halfway there. I ve got a WM 20 degree bag (31.5 oz) and a ThermaRest NeoAir XLite (14.3 oz). I d never heard
                          Message 12 of 14 , Jan 31, 2013
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                            Well, regarding your recommended equipment, I'm halfway there.  I've got a WM 20 degree bag (31.5 oz) and a ThermaRest NeoAir XLite (14.3 oz).

                            I'd never heard of Six Moons Designs, but their packs reminds me a lot of Gossamer Gear packs and some Granite Gear packs (ex. Virga).

                            As for their tents, they're in the same league as Tarptent. But, I'm getting major bang-for-the-buck with my Big Agnes Slater UL2+:  37 sq. ft. and a trail weight of 41 oz.

                            Still, I'll probably replace the REI tent with a lighter solo tent, so I'll have to do a little more research on SMD.  Thanks!

                            --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "Bo" wrote:
                            >
                            > If you're looking to make an investment in new gear, condsider looking at Six Moons Designs packs and tents and shelters,Thermarest X-Therm pads, and Western Mountaineering bags. Just these four items alone constitute a large percentage of the weight and mass carried by backpackers. Often times you can reduce the weight you'll be carrying by 50% or more with careful choice of ultralight gear.
                            >
                            > --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "Glenn Ray" wrote:
                            > >
                            > > After spending nine wonderful days in Utah (at Zion and Bryce, mostly) and hiking about 60 miles total, I'm now getting past reflection and looking forward to my next trek.
                            > >
                            > > Before proceeding, I want to be better equipped with my backpack and its contents. Although I never felt under-prepared for my hikes, I'm sure I could do better in terms of weight and quality. And, I would like to get back into backpacking again (even if just 1-2 days trips), so a search for a good sleeping bag and shelter is in order.
                            > >
                            > > I browsed through the messages in the group here. While there is some good advice posted, much of it is outdated (ex. many links have gone to the netherweb). And rather than ask, "what should I buy," I would like to hear what you all equip yourselves with.
                            > >
                            > > For the sake of limiting this discussion, let's assume this won't involve canyoneering or rappelling, but would involve backpacking for two days/one night. If this thread goes well, we could start others strictly for day hikes or canyoneering.
                            > >
                            > > So, what's in your pack? :-)
                            > >
                            > > -Glenn
                            > >
                            >
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