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new dinosaur tracks discovered near The Wave

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  • sujatabh@verizon.net
    I thought people might be interested in this: http://blogs.discovery.com/news_animal/2008/10/view-a-dinosaur.html October 20, 2008 View A Dinosaur Dance
    Message 1 of 17 , Oct 21, 2008
      I thought people might be interested in this:
      http://blogs.discovery.com/news_animal/2008/10/view-a-dinosaur.html

      October 20, 2008
      View A "Dinosaur Dance Floor"

      Around 190 million years ago, a wilderness area along the Arizona-
      Utah border was a sandy desert oasis. At this time, the U.S.
      Southwest was covered with sand dunes in an area larger than today's
      Sahara Desert. Wet intervals during the Early Jurassic period brought
      life into this desert setting and led to happening water hole
      gathering spots for multiple dinosaurs, suggests new research by
      University of Utah geologist Winston Seiler and his team.

      The scientists call the newly explored southwestern site "a dinosaur
      dance floor."

      Thousands of dinosaur tracks, averaging a dozen per square yard in
      places, were found at the site, as you'll soon see. The tracks
      reminded the geologists of a popular arcade game in which
      participants dance on illuminated, moving footprints.

      “Get out there and try stepping in their footsteps, and you feel like
      you are playing the game ‘Dance Dance Revolution’ that teenagers
      dance on,” says Marjorie Chan, professor and chair of geology and
      geophysics at the University of Utah. “This kind of reminded me of
      that – a dinosaur dance floor – because there are so many tracks and
      a variety of different tracks.”

      One very cool feature of the site is that it includes dinosaur tail
      marks. The 2.4-inch-wide tail-drag marks – which are up to 24 feet
      long – represent fewer than a dozen dinosaur tail-drag sites
      worldwide, according to Seiler.

      “Dinosaurs usually weren’t walking around with their tails dragging,”
      he said.

      Here's the full story in pictures:

      Geologist Winston Seiler with some of the dinosaur tracks he
      identified for his thesis as a University of Utah master's degree
      student. The impressions once were thought to be potholes eroded by
      water. But Seiler and Marjorie Chan, chair of geology and geophysics
      at the University of Utah, published a scientific paper in the
      October 2008 issue of the journal Palaios identifying the abundant
      impressions as comprising a large dinosaur "trample surface" in
      northern Arizona. There are so many tracks they wryly refer to the
      site as "a dinosaur dance floor."
      (Credit Nicole Miller)
      Imageresize2

      University of Utah geologist Winston Seiler walks among hundreds of
      dinosaur footprints in a "trample surface" that likely was a watering
      hole amid desert sand dunes during the Jurassic Period 190 million
      years ago. The track site, which also includes some dinosaur tail-
      drag marks, is located in Coyote Buttes North area along the Arizona-
      Utah border.
      (Credit: Roger Seiler)
      Imageresize21_2

      This Eubrontes dinosaur footprint, including three toes and a heel,
      measures roughly 16 inches long. Dinosaur footprints are named by
      their shape because the species and genus of animal that made them
      isn't known, although Eubrontes tracks are believed to have been made
      by upright-walking, meat-eaters smaller than Tyrannosaurus rex.
      Eubrontes is one of four types of dinosaur footprints identified by
      University of Utah geologists at a Jurassic Period dinosaur "trample
      surface" in northern Arizona. The footprints previously had been
      thought to be modern potholes eroded by water. The inset outlines the
      footprint shape.
      (Credit: Winston Seiler)
      Imageresize22

      Photo on left shows eroded dinosaur footprints, and tail-drag marks
      highlighted in the diagram at right, at a northern Arizona site that
      University of Utah geologists are calling "a dinosaur dance floor."
      (Credit: Winston Seiler)
      Imageresize23

      This 4-inch long Grallator dinosaur track is among four types of
      dinosaur footprints identified by University of Utah geologists at a
      large dinosaur "trample surface" in the Paria Canyon-Vermilion Cliffs
      Wilderness near the Arizona-Utah border. They were left by a small
      dinosaur, perhaps only 3 feet tall, some 190 million years ago.
      (Credit: Winston Seiler)
      Imageresize24

      This 14-inch-long Sauropodomorph dinosaur track actually is two
      footprints in one and was left by a creature that walked on four
      legs. The imprint includes the deeper central circular portion, which
      was left when a dinosaur's "pes" or rear foot, stepped into the
      larger, shallower print left by a "manus" or front foot. The toe
      prints, top and upper right, were left by the front foot, obscuring
      prints from the rear toes. The print is one of many identified by
      University of Utah scientists at a large dinosaur "trample surface"
      in the Vermilion Cliffs National Monument in northern Arizona.
      (Credit: Winston Seiler)
      Imageresize25

      This photo shows a trackway, or set of prints made by the same
      dinosaur, as it walked through a wet, sandy oasis some 190 million
      years ago in what is now the Coyote Buttes North area straddling the
      Utah-Arizona border. University of Utah geologists published a new
      study showing that numerous impressions at the site are dinosaur
      tracks, not erosion-caused potholes as was believed previously.
      (Credit: Winston Seiler)
      Imageresize26

      The "dinosaur dance floor," formally known as a dinosaur "trample
      surface," is outlined by white dashes in this photo taken from a hill
      above the three-quarter-acre site. The site's numerous holes in
      Jurassic sandstone were identified as dinosaur tracks by University
      of Utah geologists Marjorie Chan and Winston Seiler.
      (Credit: Winston Seiler)
      Imageresize27

      A dinosaur trample surface (marked by the star) has been identified
      on the Arizona side of that state's border with Utah. Geologists from
      the University of Utah determined the numerous impressions at the
      site are dinosaur tracks, not erosion features.
      (Credit: Winston Seiler)
      Imageresize28

      University of Utah geologist Winston Seiler walks in the path of
      dinosaurs. The dinosaur tracks were preserved in a "trample surface"
      where the reptiles likely gathered to drink water at an oasis among
      arid sand dunes some 190 million years ago. The site is in the Paria
      Canyon-Vermilion Cliffs Wilderness along the Arizona-Utah border.
      (Credit: Roger Seiler)
      Imageresize29
      Note: Access to Area is Limited, Permits Required

      The dinosaur trample surface and a nearby feature known as the Wave
      are in the Coyote Buttes North Special Permit Area of the Paria
      Canyon-Vermilion Cliffs Wilderness Area. A permit and $7 per person
      fee are required to enter the area.

      There is now a four-month wait for the 10 permits issued daily by
      phone or online. For permits by phone, call the U.S. Bureau of Land
      Management in St. George, Utah, at (435) 688-3246. For information
      and permits online, go here , and then click on “Coyote Buttes.” (If
      Coyote Buttes page doesn’t open, follow instructions to enable TLS
      security.)

      An additional 10 permits are issued daily – one day in advance of the
      hike – during a 9 a.m. walk-in lottery March 15-Nov. 14 at the Paria
      Contact Station, and Nov. 15-March 14 at the BLM’s Kanab (Utah) Field
      Office.
    • tdullmaier
      Wow! I saw that on the news too. Is it better to call or use the internet to try and get a permit? I would love to see them. Terry ... today s ... brought
      Message 2 of 17 , Oct 22, 2008
        Wow! I saw that on the news too. Is it better to call or use the
        internet to try and get a permit? I would love to see them.

        Terry

        --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, sujatabh@... wrote:
        >
        > I thought people might be interested in this:
        > http://blogs.discovery.com/news_animal/2008/10/view-a-dinosaur.html
        >
        > October 20, 2008
        > View A "Dinosaur Dance Floor"
        >
        > Around 190 million years ago, a wilderness area along the Arizona-
        > Utah border was a sandy desert oasis. At this time, the U.S.
        > Southwest was covered with sand dunes in an area larger than
        today's
        > Sahara Desert. Wet intervals during the Early Jurassic period
        brought
        > life into this desert setting and led to happening water hole
        > gathering spots for multiple dinosaurs, suggests new research by
        > University of Utah geologist Winston Seiler and his team.
        >
        > The scientists call the newly explored southwestern site "a
        dinosaur
        > dance floor."
        >
        > Thousands of dinosaur tracks, averaging a dozen per square yard in
        > places, were found at the site, as you'll soon see. The tracks
        > reminded the geologists of a popular arcade game in which
        > participants dance on illuminated, moving footprints.
        >
        > "Get out there and try stepping in their footsteps, and you feel
        like
        > you are playing the game `Dance Dance Revolution' that teenagers
        > dance on," says Marjorie Chan, professor and chair of geology and
        > geophysics at the University of Utah. "This kind of reminded me of
        > that – a dinosaur dance floor – because there are so many tracks
        and
        > a variety of different tracks."
        >
        > One very cool feature of the site is that it includes dinosaur
        tail
        > marks. The 2.4-inch-wide tail-drag marks – which are up to 24 feet
        > long – represent fewer than a dozen dinosaur tail-drag sites
        > worldwide, according to Seiler.
        >
        > "Dinosaurs usually weren't walking around with their tails
        dragging,"
        > he said.
        >
        > Here's the full story in pictures:
        >
        > Geologist Winston Seiler with some of the dinosaur tracks he
        > identified for his thesis as a University of Utah master's degree
        > student. The impressions once were thought to be potholes eroded
        by
        > water. But Seiler and Marjorie Chan, chair of geology and
        geophysics
        > at the University of Utah, published a scientific paper in the
        > October 2008 issue of the journal Palaios identifying the abundant
        > impressions as comprising a large dinosaur "trample surface" in
        > northern Arizona. There are so many tracks they wryly refer to the
        > site as "a dinosaur dance floor."
        > (Credit Nicole Miller)
        > Imageresize2
        >
        > University of Utah geologist Winston Seiler walks among hundreds
        of
        > dinosaur footprints in a "trample surface" that likely was a
        watering
        > hole amid desert sand dunes during the Jurassic Period 190 million
        > years ago. The track site, which also includes some dinosaur tail-
        > drag marks, is located in Coyote Buttes North area along the
        Arizona-
        > Utah border.
        > (Credit: Roger Seiler)
        > Imageresize21_2
        >
        > This Eubrontes dinosaur footprint, including three toes and a
        heel,
        > measures roughly 16 inches long. Dinosaur footprints are named by
        > their shape because the species and genus of animal that made them
        > isn't known, although Eubrontes tracks are believed to have been
        made
        > by upright-walking, meat-eaters smaller than Tyrannosaurus rex.
        > Eubrontes is one of four types of dinosaur footprints identified
        by
        > University of Utah geologists at a Jurassic Period
        dinosaur "trample
        > surface" in northern Arizona. The footprints previously had been
        > thought to be modern potholes eroded by water. The inset outlines
        the
        > footprint shape.
        > (Credit: Winston Seiler)
        > Imageresize22
        >
        > Photo on left shows eroded dinosaur footprints, and tail-drag
        marks
        > highlighted in the diagram at right, at a northern Arizona site
        that
        > University of Utah geologists are calling "a dinosaur dance floor."
        > (Credit: Winston Seiler)
        > Imageresize23
        >
        > This 4-inch long Grallator dinosaur track is among four types of
        > dinosaur footprints identified by University of Utah geologists at
        a
        > large dinosaur "trample surface" in the Paria Canyon-Vermilion
        Cliffs
        > Wilderness near the Arizona-Utah border. They were left by a small
        > dinosaur, perhaps only 3 feet tall, some 190 million years ago.
        > (Credit: Winston Seiler)
        > Imageresize24
        >
        > This 14-inch-long Sauropodomorph dinosaur track actually is two
        > footprints in one and was left by a creature that walked on four
        > legs. The imprint includes the deeper central circular portion,
        which
        > was left when a dinosaur's "pes" or rear foot, stepped into the
        > larger, shallower print left by a "manus" or front foot. The toe
        > prints, top and upper right, were left by the front foot,
        obscuring
        > prints from the rear toes. The print is one of many identified by
        > University of Utah scientists at a large dinosaur "trample
        surface"
        > in the Vermilion Cliffs National Monument in northern Arizona.
        > (Credit: Winston Seiler)
        > Imageresize25
        >
        > This photo shows a trackway, or set of prints made by the same
        > dinosaur, as it walked through a wet, sandy oasis some 190 million
        > years ago in what is now the Coyote Buttes North area straddling
        the
        > Utah-Arizona border. University of Utah geologists published a new
        > study showing that numerous impressions at the site are dinosaur
        > tracks, not erosion-caused potholes as was believed previously.
        > (Credit: Winston Seiler)
        > Imageresize26
        >
        > The "dinosaur dance floor," formally known as a dinosaur "trample
        > surface," is outlined by white dashes in this photo taken from a
        hill
        > above the three-quarter-acre site. The site's numerous holes in
        > Jurassic sandstone were identified as dinosaur tracks by
        University
        > of Utah geologists Marjorie Chan and Winston Seiler.
        > (Credit: Winston Seiler)
        > Imageresize27
        >
        > A dinosaur trample surface (marked by the star) has been
        identified
        > on the Arizona side of that state's border with Utah. Geologists
        from
        > the University of Utah determined the numerous impressions at the
        > site are dinosaur tracks, not erosion features.
        > (Credit: Winston Seiler)
        > Imageresize28
        >
        > University of Utah geologist Winston Seiler walks in the path of
        > dinosaurs. The dinosaur tracks were preserved in a "trample
        surface"
        > where the reptiles likely gathered to drink water at an oasis
        among
        > arid sand dunes some 190 million years ago. The site is in the
        Paria
        > Canyon-Vermilion Cliffs Wilderness along the Arizona-Utah border.
        > (Credit: Roger Seiler)
        > Imageresize29
        > Note: Access to Area is Limited, Permits Required
        >
        > The dinosaur trample surface and a nearby feature known as the
        Wave
        > are in the Coyote Buttes North Special Permit Area of the Paria
        > Canyon-Vermilion Cliffs Wilderness Area. A permit and $7 per
        person
        > fee are required to enter the area.
        >
        > There is now a four-month wait for the 10 permits issued daily by
        > phone or online. For permits by phone, call the U.S. Bureau of
        Land
        > Management in St. George, Utah, at (435) 688-3246. For information
        > and permits online, go here , and then click on "Coyote Buttes."
        (If
        > Coyote Buttes page doesn't open, follow instructions to enable TLS
        > security.)
        >
        > An additional 10 permits are issued daily – one day in advance of
        the
        > hike – during a 9 a.m. walk-in lottery March 15-Nov. 14 at the
        Paria
        > Contact Station, and Nov. 15-March 14 at the BLM's Kanab (Utah)
        Field
        > Office.
        >
      • rebgolfer@aol.com
        Thanks for posting! When we did that hike to The Wave two years ago we had the pleasure to meet Winston. It was a great experience as he spent several
        Message 3 of 17 , Oct 22, 2008
          Thanks for posting!  When we did that hike to "The Wave" two years ago we had the pleasure to meet Winston.  It was a great experience as he spent several hours with us and explained how the area was formed.  He also showed us where there were a few dinosaur prints.  As Paul Harvey says "Now I know the rest of the story"
           
          Bob



        • Shaun
          Anyone know the location or a good guess? I was already planning on hiking this when I go to visit family in the area soon. Since I was in the area might as
          Message 4 of 17 , Oct 22, 2008
            Anyone know the location or a good guess? I was already planning on
            hiking this when I go to visit family in the area soon. Since I was
            in the area might as well check it out.


            --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, sujatabh@... wrote:
            >
            > I thought people might be interested in this:
            > http://blogs.discovery.com/news_animal/2008/10/view-a-dinosaur.html
            >
            > October 20, 2008
            > View A "Dinosaur Dance Floor"
            >
            > Around 190 million years ago, a wilderness area along the Arizona-
            > Utah border was a sandy desert oasis. At this time, the U.S.
            > Southwest was covered with sand dunes in an area larger than
            today's
            > Sahara Desert. Wet intervals during the Early Jurassic period
            brought
            > life into this desert setting and led to happening water hole
            > gathering spots for multiple dinosaurs, suggests new research by
            > University of Utah geologist Winston Seiler and his team.
            >
            > The scientists call the newly explored southwestern site "a
            dinosaur
            > dance floor."
            >
            > Thousands of dinosaur tracks, averaging a dozen per square yard in
            > places, were found at the site, as you'll soon see. The tracks
            > reminded the geologists of a popular arcade game in which
            > participants dance on illuminated, moving footprints.
            >
            > "Get out there and try stepping in their footsteps, and you feel
            like
            > you are playing the game `Dance Dance Revolution' that teenagers
            > dance on," says Marjorie Chan, professor and chair of geology and
            > geophysics at the University of Utah. "This kind of reminded me of
            > that – a dinosaur dance floor – because there are so many tracks
            and
            > a variety of different tracks."
            >
            > One very cool feature of the site is that it includes dinosaur
            tail
            > marks. The 2.4-inch-wide tail-drag marks – which are up to 24 feet
            > long – represent fewer than a dozen dinosaur tail-drag sites
            > worldwide, according to Seiler.
            >
            > "Dinosaurs usually weren't walking around with their tails
            dragging,"
            > he said.
            >
            > Here's the full story in pictures:
            >
            > Geologist Winston Seiler with some of the dinosaur tracks he
            > identified for his thesis as a University of Utah master's degree
            > student. The impressions once were thought to be potholes eroded
            by
            > water. But Seiler and Marjorie Chan, chair of geology and
            geophysics
            > at the University of Utah, published a scientific paper in the
            > October 2008 issue of the journal Palaios identifying the abundant
            > impressions as comprising a large dinosaur "trample surface" in
            > northern Arizona. There are so many tracks they wryly refer to the
            > site as "a dinosaur dance floor."
            > (Credit Nicole Miller)
            > Imageresize2
            >
            > University of Utah geologist Winston Seiler walks among hundreds
            of
            > dinosaur footprints in a "trample surface" that likely was a
            watering
            > hole amid desert sand dunes during the Jurassic Period 190 million
            > years ago. The track site, which also includes some dinosaur tail-
            > drag marks, is located in Coyote Buttes North area along the
            Arizona-
            > Utah border.
            > (Credit: Roger Seiler)
            > Imageresize21_2
            >
            > This Eubrontes dinosaur footprint, including three toes and a
            heel,
            > measures roughly 16 inches long. Dinosaur footprints are named by
            > their shape because the species and genus of animal that made them
            > isn't known, although Eubrontes tracks are believed to have been
            made
            > by upright-walking, meat-eaters smaller than Tyrannosaurus rex.
            > Eubrontes is one of four types of dinosaur footprints identified
            by
            > University of Utah geologists at a Jurassic Period
            dinosaur "trample
            > surface" in northern Arizona. The footprints previously had been
            > thought to be modern potholes eroded by water. The inset outlines
            the
            > footprint shape.
            > (Credit: Winston Seiler)
            > Imageresize22
            >
            > Photo on left shows eroded dinosaur footprints, and tail-drag
            marks
            > highlighted in the diagram at right, at a northern Arizona site
            that
            > University of Utah geologists are calling "a dinosaur dance floor."
            > (Credit: Winston Seiler)
            > Imageresize23
            >
            > This 4-inch long Grallator dinosaur track is among four types of
            > dinosaur footprints identified by University of Utah geologists at
            a
            > large dinosaur "trample surface" in the Paria Canyon-Vermilion
            Cliffs
            > Wilderness near the Arizona-Utah border. They were left by a small
            > dinosaur, perhaps only 3 feet tall, some 190 million years ago.
            > (Credit: Winston Seiler)
            > Imageresize24
            >
            > This 14-inch-long Sauropodomorph dinosaur track actually is two
            > footprints in one and was left by a creature that walked on four
            > legs. The imprint includes the deeper central circular portion,
            which
            > was left when a dinosaur's "pes" or rear foot, stepped into the
            > larger, shallower print left by a "manus" or front foot. The toe
            > prints, top and upper right, were left by the front foot,
            obscuring
            > prints from the rear toes. The print is one of many identified by
            > University of Utah scientists at a large dinosaur "trample
            surface"
            > in the Vermilion Cliffs National Monument in northern Arizona.
            > (Credit: Winston Seiler)
            > Imageresize25
            >
            > This photo shows a trackway, or set of prints made by the same
            > dinosaur, as it walked through a wet, sandy oasis some 190 million
            > years ago in what is now the Coyote Buttes North area straddling
            the
            > Utah-Arizona border. University of Utah geologists published a new
            > study showing that numerous impressions at the site are dinosaur
            > tracks, not erosion-caused potholes as was believed previously.
            > (Credit: Winston Seiler)
            > Imageresize26
            >
            > The "dinosaur dance floor," formally known as a dinosaur "trample
            > surface," is outlined by white dashes in this photo taken from a
            hill
            > above the three-quarter-acre site. The site's numerous holes in
            > Jurassic sandstone were identified as dinosaur tracks by
            University
            > of Utah geologists Marjorie Chan and Winston Seiler.
            > (Credit: Winston Seiler)
            > Imageresize27
            >
            > A dinosaur trample surface (marked by the star) has been
            identified
            > on the Arizona side of that state's border with Utah. Geologists
            from
            > the University of Utah determined the numerous impressions at the
            > site are dinosaur tracks, not erosion features.
            > (Credit: Winston Seiler)
            > Imageresize28
            >
            > University of Utah geologist Winston Seiler walks in the path of
            > dinosaurs. The dinosaur tracks were preserved in a "trample
            surface"
            > where the reptiles likely gathered to drink water at an oasis
            among
            > arid sand dunes some 190 million years ago. The site is in the
            Paria
            > Canyon-Vermilion Cliffs Wilderness along the Arizona-Utah border.
            > (Credit: Roger Seiler)
            > Imageresize29
            > Note: Access to Area is Limited, Permits Required
            >
            > The dinosaur trample surface and a nearby feature known as the
            Wave
            > are in the Coyote Buttes North Special Permit Area of the Paria
            > Canyon-Vermilion Cliffs Wilderness Area. A permit and $7 per
            person
            > fee are required to enter the area.
            >
            > There is now a four-month wait for the 10 permits issued daily by
            > phone or online. For permits by phone, call the U.S. Bureau of
            Land
            > Management in St. George, Utah, at (435) 688-3246. For information
            > and permits online, go here , and then click on "Coyote Buttes."
            (If
            > Coyote Buttes page doesn't open, follow instructions to enable TLS
            > security.)
            >
            > An additional 10 permits are issued daily – one day in advance of
            the
            > hike – during a 9 a.m. walk-in lottery March 15-Nov. 14 at the
            Paria
            > Contact Station, and Nov. 15-March 14 at the BLM's Kanab (Utah)
            Field
            > Office.
            >
          • Henk
            Hi Shaun, I was immediately intrigued by the publication and my first guess about the location that it should be somewhere on the east side of Toprock. Looking
            Message 5 of 17 , Oct 23, 2008
              Hi Shaun,

              I was immediately intrigued by the publication and my first guess about the
              location that it should be somewhere on the east side of Toprock. Looking
              closer at some of the pictures I took and the ones from the publication I saw
              some landmarks that I also recognized on my pictures. With 100% certainty I can
              say it is very close to a feature dubbed the "Big Mac"

              When you hike up to the wave do not go in but instead go left(east)and follow
              the base of toprock. Soon you will see the north and the south teepees. When
              you reach the point where(you facing south) on your left (in the distance) the
              north teepees rise up and on your right top rock starts to open up you are
              almost there. Turn right and face west. It is in this opening on the left side
              facing west.

              I can send you a picture showing the location if you're interested.

              Henk

              Shaun wrote:
              >
              >
              > Anyone know the location or a good guess? I was already planning on
              > hiking this when I go to visit family in the area soon. Since I was
              > in the area might as well check it out.
              >
            • bomabro84738
              Let me know when you might be going? I d love to join you if you wouldn t mind? Bo ... dinosaur.html ... in ... and ... of ... feet ... degree ... abundant ...
              Message 6 of 17 , Oct 23, 2008
                Let me know when you might be going? I'd love to join you if you
                wouldn't mind?
                Bo

                --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "Shaun"
                <trackrunner83@...> wrote:
                >
                > Anyone know the location or a good guess? I was already planning on
                > hiking this when I go to visit family in the area soon. Since I was
                > in the area might as well check it out.
                >
                >
                > --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, sujatabh@ wrote:
                > >
                > > I thought people might be interested in this:
                > > http://blogs.discovery.com/news_animal/2008/10/view-a-
                dinosaur.html
                > >
                > > October 20, 2008
                > > View A "Dinosaur Dance Floor"
                > >
                > > Around 190 million years ago, a wilderness area along the Arizona-

                > > Utah border was a sandy desert oasis. At this time, the U.S.
                > > Southwest was covered with sand dunes in an area larger than
                > today's
                > > Sahara Desert. Wet intervals during the Early Jurassic period
                > brought
                > > life into this desert setting and led to happening water hole
                > > gathering spots for multiple dinosaurs, suggests new research by
                > > University of Utah geologist Winston Seiler and his team.
                > >
                > > The scientists call the newly explored southwestern site "a
                > dinosaur
                > > dance floor."
                > >
                > > Thousands of dinosaur tracks, averaging a dozen per square yard
                in
                > > places, were found at the site, as you'll soon see. The tracks
                > > reminded the geologists of a popular arcade game in which
                > > participants dance on illuminated, moving footprints.
                > >
                > > "Get out there and try stepping in their footsteps, and you feel
                > like
                > > you are playing the game `Dance Dance Revolution' that teenagers
                > > dance on," says Marjorie Chan, professor and chair of geology
                and
                > > geophysics at the University of Utah. "This kind of reminded me
                of
                > > that – a dinosaur dance floor – because there are so many tracks
                > and
                > > a variety of different tracks."
                > >
                > > One very cool feature of the site is that it includes dinosaur
                > tail
                > > marks. The 2.4-inch-wide tail-drag marks – which are up to 24
                feet
                > > long – represent fewer than a dozen dinosaur tail-drag sites
                > > worldwide, according to Seiler.
                > >
                > > "Dinosaurs usually weren't walking around with their tails
                > dragging,"
                > > he said.
                > >
                > > Here's the full story in pictures:
                > >
                > > Geologist Winston Seiler with some of the dinosaur tracks he
                > > identified for his thesis as a University of Utah master's
                degree
                > > student. The impressions once were thought to be potholes eroded
                > by
                > > water. But Seiler and Marjorie Chan, chair of geology and
                > geophysics
                > > at the University of Utah, published a scientific paper in the
                > > October 2008 issue of the journal Palaios identifying the
                abundant
                > > impressions as comprising a large dinosaur "trample surface" in
                > > northern Arizona. There are so many tracks they wryly refer to
                the
                > > site as "a dinosaur dance floor."
                > > (Credit Nicole Miller)
                > > Imageresize2
                > >
                > > University of Utah geologist Winston Seiler walks among hundreds
                > of
                > > dinosaur footprints in a "trample surface" that likely was a
                > watering
                > > hole amid desert sand dunes during the Jurassic Period 190
                million
                > > years ago. The track site, which also includes some dinosaur tail-

                > > drag marks, is located in Coyote Buttes North area along the
                > Arizona-
                > > Utah border.
                > > (Credit: Roger Seiler)
                > > Imageresize21_2
                > >
                > > This Eubrontes dinosaur footprint, including three toes and a
                > heel,
                > > measures roughly 16 inches long. Dinosaur footprints are named
                by
                > > their shape because the species and genus of animal that made
                them
                > > isn't known, although Eubrontes tracks are believed to have been
                > made
                > > by upright-walking, meat-eaters smaller than Tyrannosaurus rex.
                > > Eubrontes is one of four types of dinosaur footprints identified
                > by
                > > University of Utah geologists at a Jurassic Period
                > dinosaur "trample
                > > surface" in northern Arizona. The footprints previously had been
                > > thought to be modern potholes eroded by water. The inset outlines
                > the
                > > footprint shape.
                > > (Credit: Winston Seiler)
                > > Imageresize22
                > >
                > > Photo on left shows eroded dinosaur footprints, and tail-drag
                > marks
                > > highlighted in the diagram at right, at a northern Arizona site
                > that
                > > University of Utah geologists are calling "a dinosaur dance
                floor."
                > > (Credit: Winston Seiler)
                > > Imageresize23
                > >
                > > This 4-inch long Grallator dinosaur track is among four types of
                > > dinosaur footprints identified by University of Utah geologists
                at
                > a
                > > large dinosaur "trample surface" in the Paria Canyon-Vermilion
                > Cliffs
                > > Wilderness near the Arizona-Utah border. They were left by a
                small
                > > dinosaur, perhaps only 3 feet tall, some 190 million years ago.
                > > (Credit: Winston Seiler)
                > > Imageresize24
                > >
                > > This 14-inch-long Sauropodomorph dinosaur track actually is two
                > > footprints in one and was left by a creature that walked on four
                > > legs. The imprint includes the deeper central circular portion,
                > which
                > > was left when a dinosaur's "pes" or rear foot, stepped into the
                > > larger, shallower print left by a "manus" or front foot. The toe
                > > prints, top and upper right, were left by the front foot,
                > obscuring
                > > prints from the rear toes. The print is one of many identified
                by
                > > University of Utah scientists at a large dinosaur "trample
                > surface"
                > > in the Vermilion Cliffs National Monument in northern Arizona.
                > > (Credit: Winston Seiler)
                > > Imageresize25
                > >
                > > This photo shows a trackway, or set of prints made by the same
                > > dinosaur, as it walked through a wet, sandy oasis some 190
                million
                > > years ago in what is now the Coyote Buttes North area straddling
                > the
                > > Utah-Arizona border. University of Utah geologists published a
                new
                > > study showing that numerous impressions at the site are dinosaur
                > > tracks, not erosion-caused potholes as was believed previously.
                > > (Credit: Winston Seiler)
                > > Imageresize26
                > >
                > > The "dinosaur dance floor," formally known as a
                dinosaur "trample
                > > surface," is outlined by white dashes in this photo taken from a
                > hill
                > > above the three-quarter-acre site. The site's numerous holes in
                > > Jurassic sandstone were identified as dinosaur tracks by
                > University
                > > of Utah geologists Marjorie Chan and Winston Seiler.
                > > (Credit: Winston Seiler)
                > > Imageresize27
                > >
                > > A dinosaur trample surface (marked by the star) has been
                > identified
                > > on the Arizona side of that state's border with Utah. Geologists
                > from
                > > the University of Utah determined the numerous impressions at
                the
                > > site are dinosaur tracks, not erosion features.
                > > (Credit: Winston Seiler)
                > > Imageresize28
                > >
                > > University of Utah geologist Winston Seiler walks in the path of
                > > dinosaurs. The dinosaur tracks were preserved in a "trample
                > surface"
                > > where the reptiles likely gathered to drink water at an oasis
                > among
                > > arid sand dunes some 190 million years ago. The site is in the
                > Paria
                > > Canyon-Vermilion Cliffs Wilderness along the Arizona-Utah border.
                > > (Credit: Roger Seiler)
                > > Imageresize29
                > > Note: Access to Area is Limited, Permits Required
                > >
                > > The dinosaur trample surface and a nearby feature known as the
                > Wave
                > > are in the Coyote Buttes North Special Permit Area of the Paria
                > > Canyon-Vermilion Cliffs Wilderness Area. A permit and $7 per
                > person
                > > fee are required to enter the area.
                > >
                > > There is now a four-month wait for the 10 permits issued daily
                by
                > > phone or online. For permits by phone, call the U.S. Bureau of
                > Land
                > > Management in St. George, Utah, at (435) 688-3246. For
                information
                > > and permits online, go here , and then click on "Coyote Buttes."
                > (If
                > > Coyote Buttes page doesn't open, follow instructions to enable
                TLS
                > > security.)
                > >
                > > An additional 10 permits are issued daily – one day in advance of
                > the
                > > hike – during a 9 a.m. walk-in lottery March 15-Nov. 14 at the
                > Paria
                > > Contact Station, and Nov. 15-March 14 at the BLM's Kanab (Utah)
                > Field
                > > Office.
                > >
                >
              • Shaun
                Thanks Bo. I will be coming down Nov 7-9th and be back again the next weekend 15-16th. Maybe down for the weekend of Thanksgiving, maybe. Things on my do list
                Message 7 of 17 , Oct 23, 2008
                  Thanks Bo. I will be coming down Nov 7-9th and be back again the next
                  weekend 15-16th. Maybe down for the weekend of Thanksgiving, maybe.

                  Things on my do list someday are: the Wave, sneak and peak of
                  Buckskin Gulch, other stuff out in Paria (full Buckskin Paria
                  somday), Snake Gulch, another trip through Birch Hallow and of coarse
                  more Zion stuff, the cool stuff out by Coral Pink. Basically anything
                  on your website. :) Figured these weekends may be a good time to
                  knock off some of this. Anything on Sunday would have to be short to
                  make the travel back home, so the Saturdays would be the best.

                  --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "bomabro84738"
                  <bbeck@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Let me know when you might be going? I'd love to join you if you
                  > wouldn't mind?
                  > Bo
                  >
                  > --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "Shaun"
                  > <trackrunner83@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > Anyone know the location or a good guess? I was already planning
                  on
                  > > hiking this when I go to visit family in the area soon. Since I
                  was
                  > > in the area might as well check it out.
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, sujatabh@ wrote:
                  > > >
                  > > > I thought people might be interested in this:
                  > > > http://blogs.discovery.com/news_animal/2008/10/view-a-
                  > dinosaur.html
                  > > >
                  > > > October 20, 2008
                  > > > View A "Dinosaur Dance Floor"
                  > > >
                  > > > Around 190 million years ago, a wilderness area along the
                  Arizona-
                  >
                  > > > Utah border was a sandy desert oasis. At this time, the U.S.
                  > > > Southwest was covered with sand dunes in an area larger than
                  > > today's
                  > > > Sahara Desert. Wet intervals during the Early Jurassic period
                  > > brought
                  > > > life into this desert setting and led to happening water hole
                  > > > gathering spots for multiple dinosaurs, suggests new research
                  by
                  > > > University of Utah geologist Winston Seiler and his team.
                  > > >
                  > > > The scientists call the newly explored southwestern site "a
                  > > dinosaur
                  > > > dance floor."
                  > > >
                  > > > Thousands of dinosaur tracks, averaging a dozen per square yard
                  > in
                  > > > places, were found at the site, as you'll soon see. The tracks
                  > > > reminded the geologists of a popular arcade game in which
                  > > > participants dance on illuminated, moving footprints.
                  > > >
                  > > > "Get out there and try stepping in their footsteps, and you
                  feel
                  > > like
                  > > > you are playing the game `Dance Dance Revolution' that
                  teenagers
                  > > > dance on," says Marjorie Chan, professor and chair of geology
                  > and
                  > > > geophysics at the University of Utah. "This kind of reminded me
                  > of
                  > > > that – a dinosaur dance floor – because there are so many
                  tracks
                  > > and
                  > > > a variety of different tracks."
                  > > >
                  > > > One very cool feature of the site is that it includes dinosaur
                  > > tail
                  > > > marks. The 2.4-inch-wide tail-drag marks – which are up to 24
                  > feet
                  > > > long – represent fewer than a dozen dinosaur tail-drag sites
                  > > > worldwide, according to Seiler.
                  > > >
                  > > > "Dinosaurs usually weren't walking around with their tails
                  > > dragging,"
                  > > > he said.
                  > > >
                  > > > Here's the full story in pictures:
                  > > >
                  > > > Geologist Winston Seiler with some of the dinosaur tracks he
                  > > > identified for his thesis as a University of Utah master's
                  > degree
                  > > > student. The impressions once were thought to be potholes
                  eroded
                  > > by
                  > > > water. But Seiler and Marjorie Chan, chair of geology and
                  > > geophysics
                  > > > at the University of Utah, published a scientific paper in the
                  > > > October 2008 issue of the journal Palaios identifying the
                  > abundant
                  > > > impressions as comprising a large dinosaur "trample surface"
                  in
                  > > > northern Arizona. There are so many tracks they wryly refer to
                  > the
                  > > > site as "a dinosaur dance floor."
                  > > > (Credit Nicole Miller)
                  > > > Imageresize2
                  > > >
                  > > > University of Utah geologist Winston Seiler walks among
                  hundreds
                  > > of
                  > > > dinosaur footprints in a "trample surface" that likely was a
                  > > watering
                  > > > hole amid desert sand dunes during the Jurassic Period 190
                  > million
                  > > > years ago. The track site, which also includes some dinosaur
                  tail-
                  >
                  > > > drag marks, is located in Coyote Buttes North area along the
                  > > Arizona-
                  > > > Utah border.
                  > > > (Credit: Roger Seiler)
                  > > > Imageresize21_2
                  > > >
                  > > > This Eubrontes dinosaur footprint, including three toes and a
                  > > heel,
                  > > > measures roughly 16 inches long. Dinosaur footprints are named
                  > by
                  > > > their shape because the species and genus of animal that made
                  > them
                  > > > isn't known, although Eubrontes tracks are believed to have
                  been
                  > > made
                  > > > by upright-walking, meat-eaters smaller than Tyrannosaurus
                  rex.
                  > > > Eubrontes is one of four types of dinosaur footprints
                  identified
                  > > by
                  > > > University of Utah geologists at a Jurassic Period
                  > > dinosaur "trample
                  > > > surface" in northern Arizona. The footprints previously had
                  been
                  > > > thought to be modern potholes eroded by water. The inset
                  outlines
                  > > the
                  > > > footprint shape.
                  > > > (Credit: Winston Seiler)
                  > > > Imageresize22
                  > > >
                  > > > Photo on left shows eroded dinosaur footprints, and tail-drag
                  > > marks
                  > > > highlighted in the diagram at right, at a northern Arizona site
                  > > that
                  > > > University of Utah geologists are calling "a dinosaur dance
                  > floor."
                  > > > (Credit: Winston Seiler)
                  > > > Imageresize23
                  > > >
                  > > > This 4-inch long Grallator dinosaur track is among four types
                  of
                  > > > dinosaur footprints identified by University of Utah geologists
                  > at
                  > > a
                  > > > large dinosaur "trample surface" in the Paria Canyon-Vermilion
                  > > Cliffs
                  > > > Wilderness near the Arizona-Utah border. They were left by a
                  > small
                  > > > dinosaur, perhaps only 3 feet tall, some 190 million years ago.
                  > > > (Credit: Winston Seiler)
                  > > > Imageresize24
                  > > >
                  > > > This 14-inch-long Sauropodomorph dinosaur track actually is
                  two
                  > > > footprints in one and was left by a creature that walked on
                  four
                  > > > legs. The imprint includes the deeper central circular portion,
                  > > which
                  > > > was left when a dinosaur's "pes" or rear foot, stepped into
                  the
                  > > > larger, shallower print left by a "manus" or front foot. The
                  toe
                  > > > prints, top and upper right, were left by the front foot,
                  > > obscuring
                  > > > prints from the rear toes. The print is one of many identified
                  > by
                  > > > University of Utah scientists at a large dinosaur "trample
                  > > surface"
                  > > > in the Vermilion Cliffs National Monument in northern Arizona.
                  > > > (Credit: Winston Seiler)
                  > > > Imageresize25
                  > > >
                  > > > This photo shows a trackway, or set of prints made by the same
                  > > > dinosaur, as it walked through a wet, sandy oasis some 190
                  > million
                  > > > years ago in what is now the Coyote Buttes North area
                  straddling
                  > > the
                  > > > Utah-Arizona border. University of Utah geologists published a
                  > new
                  > > > study showing that numerous impressions at the site are
                  dinosaur
                  > > > tracks, not erosion-caused potholes as was believed previously.
                  > > > (Credit: Winston Seiler)
                  > > > Imageresize26
                  > > >
                  > > > The "dinosaur dance floor," formally known as a
                  > dinosaur "trample
                  > > > surface," is outlined by white dashes in this photo taken from
                  a
                  > > hill
                  > > > above the three-quarter-acre site. The site's numerous holes
                  in
                  > > > Jurassic sandstone were identified as dinosaur tracks by
                  > > University
                  > > > of Utah geologists Marjorie Chan and Winston Seiler.
                  > > > (Credit: Winston Seiler)
                  > > > Imageresize27
                  > > >
                  > > > A dinosaur trample surface (marked by the star) has been
                  > > identified
                  > > > on the Arizona side of that state's border with Utah.
                  Geologists
                  > > from
                  > > > the University of Utah determined the numerous impressions at
                  > the
                  > > > site are dinosaur tracks, not erosion features.
                  > > > (Credit: Winston Seiler)
                  > > > Imageresize28
                  > > >
                  > > > University of Utah geologist Winston Seiler walks in the path
                  of
                  > > > dinosaurs. The dinosaur tracks were preserved in a "trample
                  > > surface"
                  > > > where the reptiles likely gathered to drink water at an oasis
                  > > among
                  > > > arid sand dunes some 190 million years ago. The site is in the
                  > > Paria
                  > > > Canyon-Vermilion Cliffs Wilderness along the Arizona-Utah
                  border.
                  > > > (Credit: Roger Seiler)
                  > > > Imageresize29
                  > > > Note: Access to Area is Limited, Permits Required
                  > > >
                  > > > The dinosaur trample surface and a nearby feature known as the
                  > > Wave
                  > > > are in the Coyote Buttes North Special Permit Area of the
                  Paria
                  > > > Canyon-Vermilion Cliffs Wilderness Area. A permit and $7 per
                  > > person
                  > > > fee are required to enter the area.
                  > > >
                  > > > There is now a four-month wait for the 10 permits issued daily
                  > by
                  > > > phone or online. For permits by phone, call the U.S. Bureau of
                  > > Land
                  > > > Management in St. George, Utah, at (435) 688-3246. For
                  > information
                  > > > and permits online, go here , and then click on "Coyote
                  Buttes."
                  > > (If
                  > > > Coyote Buttes page doesn't open, follow instructions to enable
                  > TLS
                  > > > security.)
                  > > >
                  > > > An additional 10 permits are issued daily – one day in advance
                  of
                  > > the
                  > > > hike – during a 9 a.m. walk-in lottery March 15-Nov. 14 at the
                  > > Paria
                  > > > Contact Station, and Nov. 15-March 14 at the BLM's Kanab (Utah)
                  > > Field
                  > > > Office.
                  > > >
                  > >
                  >
                • bomabro84738
                  Just keep me posted and I d love to get out with you if I can! I spoke with Linda Price this morning (BLM admistrator for N and S Coyote Buttes) and she said
                  Message 8 of 17 , Oct 23, 2008
                    Just keep me posted and I'd love to get out with you if I can!
                    I spoke with Linda Price this morning (BLM admistrator for N and S
                    Coyote Buttes) and she said that she was SWAMPED returning calls
                    from the media all over the world wanting access to the Dino.
                    tracks! I have a feeling that getting a permit to North Coyote
                    Buttes aka "The Wave" and newly found Dino Tracks is going to be
                    really, REALLY tough in the near future! We'll have to pick out a
                    snowy day this winter maybe ;)

                    --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "Shaun"
                    <trackrunner83@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Thanks Bo. I will be coming down Nov 7-9th and be back again the
                    next
                    > weekend 15-16th. Maybe down for the weekend of Thanksgiving,
                    maybe.
                    >
                    > Things on my do list someday are: the Wave, sneak and peak of
                    > Buckskin Gulch, other stuff out in Paria (full Buckskin Paria
                    > somday), Snake Gulch, another trip through Birch Hallow and of
                    coarse
                    > more Zion stuff, the cool stuff out by Coral Pink. Basically
                    anything
                    > on your website. :) Figured these weekends may be a good time to
                    > knock off some of this. Anything on Sunday would have to be short
                    to
                    > make the travel back home, so the Saturdays would be the best.
                    >
                    > --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "bomabro84738"
                    > <bbeck@> wrote:
                    > >
                    > > Let me know when you might be going? I'd love to join you if you
                    > > wouldn't mind?
                    > > Bo
                    > >
                    > > --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "Shaun"
                    > > <trackrunner83@> wrote:
                    > > >
                    > > > Anyone know the location or a good guess? I was already
                    planning
                    > on
                    > > > hiking this when I go to visit family in the area soon. Since
                    I
                    > was
                    > > > in the area might as well check it out.
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > > --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, sujatabh@
                    wrote:
                    > > > >
                    > > > > I thought people might be interested in this:
                    > > > > http://blogs.discovery.com/news_animal/2008/10/view-a-
                    > > dinosaur.html
                    > > > >
                    > > > > October 20, 2008
                    > > > > View A "Dinosaur Dance Floor"
                    > > > >
                    > > > > Around 190 million years ago, a wilderness area along the
                    > Arizona-
                    > >
                    > > > > Utah border was a sandy desert oasis. At this time, the
                    U.S.
                    > > > > Southwest was covered with sand dunes in an area larger than
                    > > > today's
                    > > > > Sahara Desert. Wet intervals during the Early Jurassic
                    period
                    > > > brought
                    > > > > life into this desert setting and led to happening water
                    hole
                    > > > > gathering spots for multiple dinosaurs, suggests new
                    research
                    > by
                    > > > > University of Utah geologist Winston Seiler and his team.
                    > > > >
                    > > > > The scientists call the newly explored southwestern site "a
                    > > > dinosaur
                    > > > > dance floor."
                    > > > >
                    > > > > Thousands of dinosaur tracks, averaging a dozen per square
                    yard
                    > > in
                    > > > > places, were found at the site, as you'll soon see. The
                    tracks
                    > > > > reminded the geologists of a popular arcade game in which
                    > > > > participants dance on illuminated, moving footprints.
                    > > > >
                    > > > > "Get out there and try stepping in their footsteps, and you
                    > feel
                    > > > like
                    > > > > you are playing the game `Dance Dance Revolution' that
                    > teenagers
                    > > > > dance on," says Marjorie Chan, professor and chair of
                    geology
                    > > and
                    > > > > geophysics at the University of Utah. "This kind of reminded
                    me
                    > > of
                    > > > > that – a dinosaur dance floor – because there are so many
                    > tracks
                    > > > and
                    > > > > a variety of different tracks."
                    > > > >
                    > > > > One very cool feature of the site is that it includes
                    dinosaur
                    > > > tail
                    > > > > marks. The 2.4-inch-wide tail-drag marks – which are up to
                    24
                    > > feet
                    > > > > long – represent fewer than a dozen dinosaur tail-drag
                    sites
                    > > > > worldwide, according to Seiler.
                    > > > >
                    > > > > "Dinosaurs usually weren't walking around with their tails
                    > > > dragging,"
                    > > > > he said.
                    > > > >
                    > > > > Here's the full story in pictures:
                    > > > >
                    > > > > Geologist Winston Seiler with some of the dinosaur tracks
                    he
                    > > > > identified for his thesis as a University of Utah master's
                    > > degree
                    > > > > student. The impressions once were thought to be potholes
                    > eroded
                    > > > by
                    > > > > water. But Seiler and Marjorie Chan, chair of geology and
                    > > > geophysics
                    > > > > at the University of Utah, published a scientific paper in
                    the
                    > > > > October 2008 issue of the journal Palaios identifying the
                    > > abundant
                    > > > > impressions as comprising a large dinosaur "trample surface"
                    > in
                    > > > > northern Arizona. There are so many tracks they wryly refer
                    to
                    > > the
                    > > > > site as "a dinosaur dance floor."
                    > > > > (Credit Nicole Miller)
                    > > > > Imageresize2
                    > > > >
                    > > > > University of Utah geologist Winston Seiler walks among
                    > hundreds
                    > > > of
                    > > > > dinosaur footprints in a "trample surface" that likely was a
                    > > > watering
                    > > > > hole amid desert sand dunes during the Jurassic Period 190
                    > > million
                    > > > > years ago. The track site, which also includes some dinosaur
                    > tail-
                    > >
                    > > > > drag marks, is located in Coyote Buttes North area along the
                    > > > Arizona-
                    > > > > Utah border.
                    > > > > (Credit: Roger Seiler)
                    > > > > Imageresize21_2
                    > > > >
                    > > > > This Eubrontes dinosaur footprint, including three toes and
                    a
                    > > > heel,
                    > > > > measures roughly 16 inches long. Dinosaur footprints are
                    named
                    > > by
                    > > > > their shape because the species and genus of animal that
                    made
                    > > them
                    > > > > isn't known, although Eubrontes tracks are believed to have
                    > been
                    > > > made
                    > > > > by upright-walking, meat-eaters smaller than Tyrannosaurus
                    > rex.
                    > > > > Eubrontes is one of four types of dinosaur footprints
                    > identified
                    > > > by
                    > > > > University of Utah geologists at a Jurassic Period
                    > > > dinosaur "trample
                    > > > > surface" in northern Arizona. The footprints previously had
                    > been
                    > > > > thought to be modern potholes eroded by water. The inset
                    > outlines
                    > > > the
                    > > > > footprint shape.
                    > > > > (Credit: Winston Seiler)
                    > > > > Imageresize22
                    > > > >
                    > > > > Photo on left shows eroded dinosaur footprints, and tail-
                    drag
                    > > > marks
                    > > > > highlighted in the diagram at right, at a northern Arizona
                    site
                    > > > that
                    > > > > University of Utah geologists are calling "a dinosaur dance
                    > > floor."
                    > > > > (Credit: Winston Seiler)
                    > > > > Imageresize23
                    > > > >
                    > > > > This 4-inch long Grallator dinosaur track is among four
                    types
                    > of
                    > > > > dinosaur footprints identified by University of Utah
                    geologists
                    > > at
                    > > > a
                    > > > > large dinosaur "trample surface" in the Paria Canyon-
                    Vermilion
                    > > > Cliffs
                    > > > > Wilderness near the Arizona-Utah border. They were left by a
                    > > small
                    > > > > dinosaur, perhaps only 3 feet tall, some 190 million years
                    ago.
                    > > > > (Credit: Winston Seiler)
                    > > > > Imageresize24
                    > > > >
                    > > > > This 14-inch-long Sauropodomorph dinosaur track actually is
                    > two
                    > > > > footprints in one and was left by a creature that walked on
                    > four
                    > > > > legs. The imprint includes the deeper central circular
                    portion,
                    > > > which
                    > > > > was left when a dinosaur's "pes" or rear foot, stepped into
                    > the
                    > > > > larger, shallower print left by a "manus" or front foot. The
                    > toe
                    > > > > prints, top and upper right, were left by the front foot,
                    > > > obscuring
                    > > > > prints from the rear toes. The print is one of many
                    identified
                    > > by
                    > > > > University of Utah scientists at a large dinosaur "trample
                    > > > surface"
                    > > > > in the Vermilion Cliffs National Monument in northern
                    Arizona.
                    > > > > (Credit: Winston Seiler)
                    > > > > Imageresize25
                    > > > >
                    > > > > This photo shows a trackway, or set of prints made by the
                    same
                    > > > > dinosaur, as it walked through a wet, sandy oasis some 190
                    > > million
                    > > > > years ago in what is now the Coyote Buttes North area
                    > straddling
                    > > > the
                    > > > > Utah-Arizona border. University of Utah geologists published
                    a
                    > > new
                    > > > > study showing that numerous impressions at the site are
                    > dinosaur
                    > > > > tracks, not erosion-caused potholes as was believed
                    previously.
                    > > > > (Credit: Winston Seiler)
                    > > > > Imageresize26
                    > > > >
                    > > > > The "dinosaur dance floor," formally known as a
                    > > dinosaur "trample
                    > > > > surface," is outlined by white dashes in this photo taken
                    from
                    > a
                    > > > hill
                    > > > > above the three-quarter-acre site. The site's numerous holes
                    > in
                    > > > > Jurassic sandstone were identified as dinosaur tracks by
                    > > > University
                    > > > > of Utah geologists Marjorie Chan and Winston Seiler.
                    > > > > (Credit: Winston Seiler)
                    > > > > Imageresize27
                    > > > >
                    > > > > A dinosaur trample surface (marked by the star) has been
                    > > > identified
                    > > > > on the Arizona side of that state's border with Utah.
                    > Geologists
                    > > > from
                    > > > > the University of Utah determined the numerous impressions
                    at
                    > > the
                    > > > > site are dinosaur tracks, not erosion features.
                    > > > > (Credit: Winston Seiler)
                    > > > > Imageresize28
                    > > > >
                    > > > > University of Utah geologist Winston Seiler walks in the
                    path
                    > of
                    > > > > dinosaurs. The dinosaur tracks were preserved in a "trample
                    > > > surface"
                    > > > > where the reptiles likely gathered to drink water at an
                    oasis
                    > > > among
                    > > > > arid sand dunes some 190 million years ago. The site is in
                    the
                    > > > Paria
                    > > > > Canyon-Vermilion Cliffs Wilderness along the Arizona-Utah
                    > border.
                    > > > > (Credit: Roger Seiler)
                    > > > > Imageresize29
                    > > > > Note: Access to Area is Limited, Permits Required
                    > > > >
                    > > > > The dinosaur trample surface and a nearby feature known as
                    the
                    > > > Wave
                    > > > > are in the Coyote Buttes North Special Permit Area of the
                    > Paria
                    > > > > Canyon-Vermilion Cliffs Wilderness Area. A permit and $7 per
                    > > > person
                    > > > > fee are required to enter the area.
                    > > > >
                    > > > > There is now a four-month wait for the 10 permits issued
                    daily
                    > > by
                    > > > > phone or online. For permits by phone, call the U.S. Bureau
                    of
                    > > > Land
                    > > > > Management in St. George, Utah, at (435) 688-3246. For
                    > > information
                    > > > > and permits online, go here , and then click on "Coyote
                    > Buttes."
                    > > > (If
                    > > > > Coyote Buttes page doesn't open, follow instructions to
                    enable
                    > > TLS
                    > > > > security.)
                    > > > >
                    > > > > An additional 10 permits are issued daily – one day in
                    advance
                    > of
                    > > > the
                    > > > > hike – during a 9 a.m. walk-in lottery March 15-Nov. 14 at
                    the
                    > > > Paria
                    > > > > Contact Station, and Nov. 15-March 14 at the BLM's Kanab
                    (Utah)
                    > > > Field
                    > > > > Office.
                    > > > >
                    > > >
                    > >
                    >
                  • Shaun
                    Of course Bo would be awesome to hike with you again. I was fearful about the permit problem. No calander reservations available at all. Hopefully a walk in
                    Message 9 of 17 , Oct 23, 2008
                      Of course Bo would be awesome to hike with you again. I was fearful
                      about the permit problem. No calander reservations available at all.
                      Hopefully a walk in permitt would be possible.

                      Maybe this would put preasure in increase the permitts? I bet the
                      crushing interest may just be a fad that will return to normal after
                      a few months.

                      Shaun

                      --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "bomabro84738"
                      <bbeck@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Just keep me posted and I'd love to get out with you if I can!
                      > I spoke with Linda Price this morning (BLM admistrator for N and S
                      > Coyote Buttes) and she said that she was SWAMPED returning calls
                      > from the media all over the world wanting access to the Dino.
                      > tracks! I have a feeling that getting a permit to North Coyote
                      > Buttes aka "The Wave" and newly found Dino Tracks is going to be
                      > really, REALLY tough in the near future! We'll have to pick out a
                      > snowy day this winter maybe ;)
                      >
                      > --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "Shaun"
                      > <trackrunner83@> wrote:
                      > >
                      > > Thanks Bo. I will be coming down Nov 7-9th and be back again the
                      > next
                      > > weekend 15-16th. Maybe down for the weekend of Thanksgiving,
                      > maybe.
                      > >
                      > > Things on my do list someday are: the Wave, sneak and peak of
                      > > Buckskin Gulch, other stuff out in Paria (full Buckskin Paria
                      > > somday), Snake Gulch, another trip through Birch Hallow and of
                      > coarse
                      > > more Zion stuff, the cool stuff out by Coral Pink. Basically
                      > anything
                      > > on your website. :) Figured these weekends may be a good time to
                      > > knock off some of this. Anything on Sunday would have to be short
                      > to
                      > > make the travel back home, so the Saturdays would be the best.
                      > >
                      > > --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "bomabro84738"
                      > > <bbeck@> wrote:
                      > > >
                      > > > Let me know when you might be going? I'd love to join you if
                      you
                      > > > wouldn't mind?
                      > > > Bo
                      > > >
                      > > > --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "Shaun"
                      > > > <trackrunner83@> wrote:
                      > > > >
                      > > > > Anyone know the location or a good guess? I was already
                      > planning
                      > > on
                      > > > > hiking this when I go to visit family in the area soon. Since
                      > I
                      > > was
                      > > > > in the area might as well check it out.
                      > > > >
                      > > > >
                      > > > > --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, sujatabh@
                      > wrote:
                      > > > > >
                      > > > > > I thought people might be interested in this:
                      > > > > > http://blogs.discovery.com/news_animal/2008/10/view-a-
                      > > > dinosaur.html
                      > > > > >
                      > > > > > October 20, 2008
                      > > > > > View A "Dinosaur Dance Floor"
                      > > > > >
                      > > > > > Around 190 million years ago, a wilderness area along the
                      > > Arizona-
                      > > >
                      > > > > > Utah border was a sandy desert oasis. At this time, the
                      > U.S.
                      > > > > > Southwest was covered with sand dunes in an area larger
                      than
                      > > > > today's
                      > > > > > Sahara Desert. Wet intervals during the Early Jurassic
                      > period
                      > > > > brought
                      > > > > > life into this desert setting and led to happening water
                      > hole
                      > > > > > gathering spots for multiple dinosaurs, suggests new
                      > research
                      > > by
                      > > > > > University of Utah geologist Winston Seiler and his team.
                      > > > > >
                      > > > > > The scientists call the newly explored southwestern site "a
                      > > > > dinosaur
                      > > > > > dance floor."
                      > > > > >
                      > > > > > Thousands of dinosaur tracks, averaging a dozen per square
                      > yard
                      > > > in
                      > > > > > places, were found at the site, as you'll soon see. The
                      > tracks
                      > > > > > reminded the geologists of a popular arcade game in which
                      > > > > > participants dance on illuminated, moving footprints.
                      > > > > >
                      > > > > > "Get out there and try stepping in their footsteps, and you
                      > > feel
                      > > > > like
                      > > > > > you are playing the game `Dance Dance Revolution' that
                      > > teenagers
                      > > > > > dance on," says Marjorie Chan, professor and chair of
                      > geology
                      > > > and
                      > > > > > geophysics at the University of Utah. "This kind of
                      reminded
                      > me
                      > > > of
                      > > > > > that – a dinosaur dance floor – because there are so many
                      > > tracks
                      > > > > and
                      > > > > > a variety of different tracks."
                      > > > > >
                      > > > > > One very cool feature of the site is that it includes
                      > dinosaur
                      > > > > tail
                      > > > > > marks. The 2.4-inch-wide tail-drag marks – which are up to
                      > 24
                      > > > feet
                      > > > > > long – represent fewer than a dozen dinosaur tail-drag
                      > sites
                      > > > > > worldwide, according to Seiler.
                      > > > > >
                      > > > > > "Dinosaurs usually weren't walking around with their tails
                      > > > > dragging,"
                      > > > > > he said.
                      > > > > >
                      > > > > > Here's the full story in pictures:
                      > > > > >
                      > > > > > Geologist Winston Seiler with some of the dinosaur tracks
                      > he
                      > > > > > identified for his thesis as a University of Utah master's
                      > > > degree
                      > > > > > student. The impressions once were thought to be potholes
                      > > eroded
                      > > > > by
                      > > > > > water. But Seiler and Marjorie Chan, chair of geology and
                      > > > > geophysics
                      > > > > > at the University of Utah, published a scientific paper in
                      > the
                      > > > > > October 2008 issue of the journal Palaios identifying the
                      > > > abundant
                      > > > > > impressions as comprising a large dinosaur "trample
                      surface"
                      > > in
                      > > > > > northern Arizona. There are so many tracks they wryly refer
                      > to
                      > > > the
                      > > > > > site as "a dinosaur dance floor."
                      > > > > > (Credit Nicole Miller)
                      > > > > > Imageresize2
                      > > > > >
                      > > > > > University of Utah geologist Winston Seiler walks among
                      > > hundreds
                      > > > > of
                      > > > > > dinosaur footprints in a "trample surface" that likely was
                      a
                      > > > > watering
                      > > > > > hole amid desert sand dunes during the Jurassic Period 190
                      > > > million
                      > > > > > years ago. The track site, which also includes some
                      dinosaur
                      > > tail-
                      > > >
                      > > > > > drag marks, is located in Coyote Buttes North area along
                      the
                      > > > > Arizona-
                      > > > > > Utah border.
                      > > > > > (Credit: Roger Seiler)
                      > > > > > Imageresize21_2
                      > > > > >
                      > > > > > This Eubrontes dinosaur footprint, including three toes and
                      > a
                      > > > > heel,
                      > > > > > measures roughly 16 inches long. Dinosaur footprints are
                      > named
                      > > > by
                      > > > > > their shape because the species and genus of animal that
                      > made
                      > > > them
                      > > > > > isn't known, although Eubrontes tracks are believed to have
                      > > been
                      > > > > made
                      > > > > > by upright-walking, meat-eaters smaller than Tyrannosaurus
                      > > rex.
                      > > > > > Eubrontes is one of four types of dinosaur footprints
                      > > identified
                      > > > > by
                      > > > > > University of Utah geologists at a Jurassic Period
                      > > > > dinosaur "trample
                      > > > > > surface" in northern Arizona. The footprints previously had
                      > > been
                      > > > > > thought to be modern potholes eroded by water. The inset
                      > > outlines
                      > > > > the
                      > > > > > footprint shape.
                      > > > > > (Credit: Winston Seiler)
                      > > > > > Imageresize22
                      > > > > >
                      > > > > > Photo on left shows eroded dinosaur footprints, and tail-
                      > drag
                      > > > > marks
                      > > > > > highlighted in the diagram at right, at a northern Arizona
                      > site
                      > > > > that
                      > > > > > University of Utah geologists are calling "a dinosaur dance
                      > > > floor."
                      > > > > > (Credit: Winston Seiler)
                      > > > > > Imageresize23
                      > > > > >
                      > > > > > This 4-inch long Grallator dinosaur track is among four
                      > types
                      > > of
                      > > > > > dinosaur footprints identified by University of Utah
                      > geologists
                      > > > at
                      > > > > a
                      > > > > > large dinosaur "trample surface" in the Paria Canyon-
                      > Vermilion
                      > > > > Cliffs
                      > > > > > Wilderness near the Arizona-Utah border. They were left by
                      a
                      > > > small
                      > > > > > dinosaur, perhaps only 3 feet tall, some 190 million years
                      > ago.
                      > > > > > (Credit: Winston Seiler)
                      > > > > > Imageresize24
                      > > > > >
                      > > > > > This 14-inch-long Sauropodomorph dinosaur track actually is
                      > > two
                      > > > > > footprints in one and was left by a creature that walked on
                      > > four
                      > > > > > legs. The imprint includes the deeper central circular
                      > portion,
                      > > > > which
                      > > > > > was left when a dinosaur's "pes" or rear foot, stepped into
                      > > the
                      > > > > > larger, shallower print left by a "manus" or front foot.
                      The
                      > > toe
                      > > > > > prints, top and upper right, were left by the front foot,
                      > > > > obscuring
                      > > > > > prints from the rear toes. The print is one of many
                      > identified
                      > > > by
                      > > > > > University of Utah scientists at a large dinosaur "trample
                      > > > > surface"
                      > > > > > in the Vermilion Cliffs National Monument in northern
                      > Arizona.
                      > > > > > (Credit: Winston Seiler)
                      > > > > > Imageresize25
                      > > > > >
                      > > > > > This photo shows a trackway, or set of prints made by the
                      > same
                      > > > > > dinosaur, as it walked through a wet, sandy oasis some 190
                      > > > million
                      > > > > > years ago in what is now the Coyote Buttes North area
                      > > straddling
                      > > > > the
                      > > > > > Utah-Arizona border. University of Utah geologists
                      published
                      > a
                      > > > new
                      > > > > > study showing that numerous impressions at the site are
                      > > dinosaur
                      > > > > > tracks, not erosion-caused potholes as was believed
                      > previously.
                      > > > > > (Credit: Winston Seiler)
                      > > > > > Imageresize26
                      > > > > >
                      > > > > > The "dinosaur dance floor," formally known as a
                      > > > dinosaur "trample
                      > > > > > surface," is outlined by white dashes in this photo taken
                      > from
                      > > a
                      > > > > hill
                      > > > > > above the three-quarter-acre site. The site's numerous
                      holes
                      > > in
                      > > > > > Jurassic sandstone were identified as dinosaur tracks by
                      > > > > University
                      > > > > > of Utah geologists Marjorie Chan and Winston Seiler.
                      > > > > > (Credit: Winston Seiler)
                      > > > > > Imageresize27
                      > > > > >
                      > > > > > A dinosaur trample surface (marked by the star) has been
                      > > > > identified
                      > > > > > on the Arizona side of that state's border with Utah.
                      > > Geologists
                      > > > > from
                      > > > > > the University of Utah determined the numerous impressions
                      > at
                      > > > the
                      > > > > > site are dinosaur tracks, not erosion features.
                      > > > > > (Credit: Winston Seiler)
                      > > > > > Imageresize28
                      > > > > >
                      > > > > > University of Utah geologist Winston Seiler walks in the
                      > path
                      > > of
                      > > > > > dinosaurs. The dinosaur tracks were preserved in a "trample
                      > > > > surface"
                      > > > > > where the reptiles likely gathered to drink water at an
                      > oasis
                      > > > > among
                      > > > > > arid sand dunes some 190 million years ago. The site is in
                      > the
                      > > > > Paria
                      > > > > > Canyon-Vermilion Cliffs Wilderness along the Arizona-Utah
                      > > border.
                      > > > > > (Credit: Roger Seiler)
                      > > > > > Imageresize29
                      > > > > > Note: Access to Area is Limited, Permits Required
                      > > > > >
                      > > > > > The dinosaur trample surface and a nearby feature known as
                      > the
                      > > > > Wave
                      > > > > > are in the Coyote Buttes North Special Permit Area of the
                      > > Paria
                      > > > > > Canyon-Vermilion Cliffs Wilderness Area. A permit and $7
                      per
                      > > > > person
                      > > > > > fee are required to enter the area.
                      > > > > >
                      > > > > > There is now a four-month wait for the 10 permits issued
                      > daily
                      > > > by
                      > > > > > phone or online. For permits by phone, call the U.S. Bureau
                      > of
                      > > > > Land
                      > > > > > Management in St. George, Utah, at (435) 688-3246. For
                      > > > information
                      > > > > > and permits online, go here , and then click on "Coyote
                      > > Buttes."
                      > > > > (If
                      > > > > > Coyote Buttes page doesn't open, follow instructions to
                      > enable
                      > > > TLS
                      > > > > > security.)
                      > > > > >
                      > > > > > An additional 10 permits are issued daily – one day in
                      > advance
                      > > of
                      > > > > the
                      > > > > > hike – during a 9 a.m. walk-in lottery March 15-Nov. 14 at
                      > the
                      > > > > Paria
                      > > > > > Contact Station, and Nov. 15-March 14 at the BLM's Kanab
                      > (Utah)
                      > > > > Field
                      > > > > > Office.
                      > > > > >
                      > > > >
                      > > >
                      > >
                      >
                    • ~tanya
                      I love to hike on snowy days near the Wave. [:p] I want to go.
                      Message 10 of 17 , Oct 24, 2008

                        I love to hike on snowy days near the Wave.  :p  I want to go.


                        --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "Shaun" <trackrunner83@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Of course Bo would be awesome to hike with you again. I was fearful
                        > about the permit problem. No calander reservations available at all.
                        > Hopefully a walk in permitt would be possible.
                        >
                        > Maybe this would put preasure in increase the permitts? I bet the
                        > crushing interest may just be a fad that will return to normal after
                        > a few months.
                        >
                        > Shaun
                        >
                        > --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "bomabro84738"
                        > bbeck@ wrote:
                        > >
                        > > Just keep me posted and I'd love to get out with you if I can!
                        > > I spoke with Linda Price this morning (BLM admistrator for N and S
                        > > Coyote Buttes) and she said that she was SWAMPED returning calls
                        > > from the media all over the world wanting access to the Dino.
                        > > tracks! I have a feeling that getting a permit to North Coyote
                        > > Buttes aka "The Wave" and newly found Dino Tracks is going to be
                        > > really, REALLY tough in the near future! We'll have to pick out a
                        > > snowy day this winter maybe ;)

                      • ~tanya
                        Dang! Bo and I never found the Big Mac! We found the cheeseburger [:p] We are writing an article right now for a magazine that just happened to be on Coyote
                        Message 11 of 17 , Oct 28, 2008

                          Dang! Bo and I never found the Big Mac!  We found the cheeseburger :p

                          We are writing an article right now for a magazine that just happened to be on Coyote Buttes!  I would LOVE to put the directions to this Dinosaur Dance Floor in it! 

                          I would love to see the photos Henk!


                          --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, Henk <henk.auwema@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > Hi Shaun,
                          >
                          > I was immediately intrigued by the publication and my first guess about the
                          > location that it should be somewhere on the east side of Toprock. Looking
                          > closer at some of the pictures I took and the ones from the publication I saw
                          > some landmarks that I also recognized on my pictures. With 100% certainty I can
                          > say it is very close to a feature dubbed the "Big Mac"
                          >
                          > When you hike up to the wave do not go in but instead go left(east)and follow
                          > the base of toprock. Soon you will see the north and the south teepees. When
                          > you reach the point where(you facing south) on your left (in the distance) the
                          > north teepees rise up and on your right top rock starts to open up you are
                          > almost there. Turn right and face west. It is in this opening on the left side
                          > facing west.
                          >
                          > I can send you a picture showing the location if you're interested.
                          >
                          > Henk

                        • Shaun
                          Bump will be down this and next weekends. ... fearful ... all. ... after ... and S ... a
                          Message 12 of 17 , Nov 7, 2008
                            Bump will be down this and next weekends.


                            --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "~tanya"
                            <gotta@...> wrote:
                            >
                            >
                            > I love to hike on snowy days near the Wave. [:p] I want to go.
                            >
                            >
                            > --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "Shaun"
                            > <trackrunner83@> wrote:
                            > >
                            > > Of course Bo would be awesome to hike with you again. I was
                            fearful
                            > > about the permit problem. No calander reservations available at
                            all.
                            > > Hopefully a walk in permitt would be possible.
                            > >
                            > > Maybe this would put preasure in increase the permitts? I bet the
                            > > crushing interest may just be a fad that will return to normal
                            after
                            > > a few months.
                            > >
                            > > Shaun
                            > >
                            > > --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "bomabro84738"
                            > > bbeck@ wrote:
                            > > >
                            > > > Just keep me posted and I'd love to get out with you if I can!
                            > > > I spoke with Linda Price this morning (BLM admistrator for N
                            and S
                            > > > Coyote Buttes) and she said that she was SWAMPED returning calls
                            > > > from the media all over the world wanting access to the Dino.
                            > > > tracks! I have a feeling that getting a permit to North Coyote
                            > > > Buttes aka "The Wave" and newly found Dino Tracks is going to be
                            > > > really, REALLY tough in the near future! We'll have to pick out
                            a
                            > > > snowy day this winter maybe ;)
                            >
                          • bomabro84738
                            Bump...spoke with Linda and they had just returned from Dino tracks.......Not! Two paleontologists confirm that they are not tracks. Might be interested in
                            Message 13 of 17 , Nov 7, 2008
                              Bump...spoke with Linda and they had just returned from "Dino"
                              tracks.......Not! Two paleontologists confirm that they are not
                              tracks.

                              Might be interested in going out there with you though Shaun! Let me
                              know. Permits can be had I believe at Paria Contact station the day
                              before your intended hike. You might call Kanab Field office though
                              and see if they are issuing walk-ins?

                              Coyote Buttes Special Permit Offices
                              Arizona Strip Field Office: 345 East Riverside Drive St. George
                              435.688.3200.
                              Kanab Office: 318 N 100 E 435.644.4600
                              Paria Contact Station: Located south of Highway 89 between mile post
                              21 and 22, between Kanab and Page, Az.

                              --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "Shaun"
                              <trackrunner83@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > Bump will be down this and next weekends.
                              >
                              >
                              > --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "~tanya"
                              > <gotta@> wrote:
                              > >
                              > >
                              > > I love to hike on snowy days near the Wave. [:p] I want to
                              go.
                              > >
                              > >
                              > > --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "Shaun"
                              > > <trackrunner83@> wrote:
                              > > >
                              > > > Of course Bo would be awesome to hike with you again. I was
                              > fearful
                              > > > about the permit problem. No calander reservations available
                              at
                              > all.
                              > > > Hopefully a walk in permitt would be possible.
                              > > >
                              > > > Maybe this would put preasure in increase the permitts? I bet
                              the
                              > > > crushing interest may just be a fad that will return to normal
                              > after
                              > > > a few months.
                              > > >
                              > > > Shaun
                              > > >
                              > > > --- In
                              Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "bomabro84738"
                              > > > bbeck@ wrote:
                              > > > >
                              > > > > Just keep me posted and I'd love to get out with you if I
                              can!
                              > > > > I spoke with Linda Price this morning (BLM admistrator for N
                              > and S
                              > > > > Coyote Buttes) and she said that she was SWAMPED returning
                              calls
                              > > > > from the media all over the world wanting access to the Dino.
                              > > > > tracks! I have a feeling that getting a permit to North
                              Coyote
                              > > > > Buttes aka "The Wave" and newly found Dino Tracks is going
                              to be
                              > > > > really, REALLY tough in the near future! We'll have to pick
                              out
                              > a
                              > > > > snowy day this winter maybe ;)
                              > >
                              >
                            • Bill
                              Here s an article on the subject: http://tinyurl.com/57arrn
                              Message 14 of 17 , Nov 8, 2008
                                Here's an article on the subject: http://tinyurl.com/57arrn



                                --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "bomabro84738"
                                <bbeck@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > Bump...spoke with Linda and they had just returned from "Dino"
                                > tracks.......Not! Two paleontologists confirm that they are not
                                > tracks.
                                >
                                > Might be interested in going out there with you though Shaun! Let me
                                > know. Permits can be had I believe at Paria Contact station the day
                                > before your intended hike. You might call Kanab Field office though
                                > and see if they are issuing walk-ins?
                                >
                                > Coyote Buttes Special Permit Offices
                                > Arizona Strip Field Office: 345 East Riverside Drive St. George
                                > 435.688.3200.
                                > Kanab Office: 318 N 100 E 435.644.4600
                                > Paria Contact Station: Located south of Highway 89 between mile post
                                > 21 and 22, between Kanab and Page, Az.
                                >
                                > --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "Shaun"
                                > <trackrunner83@> wrote:
                                > >
                                > > Bump will be down this and next weekends.
                                > >
                                > >
                                > > --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "~tanya"
                                > > <gotta@> wrote:
                                > > >
                                > > >
                                > > > I love to hike on snowy days near the Wave. [:p] I want to
                                > go.
                                > > >
                                > > >
                                > > > --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "Shaun"
                                > > > <trackrunner83@> wrote:
                                > > > >
                                > > > > Of course Bo would be awesome to hike with you again. I was
                                > > fearful
                                > > > > about the permit problem. No calander reservations available
                                > at
                                > > all.
                                > > > > Hopefully a walk in permitt would be possible.
                                > > > >
                                > > > > Maybe this would put preasure in increase the permitts? I bet
                                > the
                                > > > > crushing interest may just be a fad that will return to normal
                                > > after
                                > > > > a few months.
                                > > > >
                                > > > > Shaun
                                > > > >
                                > > > > --- In
                                > Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "bomabro84738"
                                > > > > bbeck@ wrote:
                                > > > > >
                                > > > > > Just keep me posted and I'd love to get out with you if I
                                > can!
                                > > > > > I spoke with Linda Price this morning (BLM admistrator for N
                                > > and S
                                > > > > > Coyote Buttes) and she said that she was SWAMPED returning
                                > calls
                                > > > > > from the media all over the world wanting access to the Dino.
                                > > > > > tracks! I have a feeling that getting a permit to North
                                > Coyote
                                > > > > > Buttes aka "The Wave" and newly found Dino Tracks is going
                                > to be
                                > > > > > really, REALLY tough in the near future! We'll have to pick
                                > out
                                > > a
                                > > > > > snowy day this winter maybe ;)
                                > > >
                                > >
                                >
                              • bomabro84738
                                As we do. Keep looking. It s an absolutely mesermizing place to be....dancing dinosaurs or no! ... me ... day ... though ... post ... to ... available ... bet
                                Message 15 of 17 , Nov 8, 2008
                                  As we do. Keep looking. It's an absolutely mesermizing place to
                                  be....dancing dinosaurs or no!

                                  --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "Bill" <wmjaho@...>
                                  wrote:
                                  >
                                  > Here's an article on the subject: http://tinyurl.com/57arrn
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "bomabro84738"
                                  > <bbeck@> wrote:
                                  > >
                                  > > Bump...spoke with Linda and they had just returned from "Dino"
                                  > > tracks.......Not! Two paleontologists confirm that they are not
                                  > > tracks.
                                  > >
                                  > > Might be interested in going out there with you though Shaun! Let
                                  me
                                  > > know. Permits can be had I believe at Paria Contact station the
                                  day
                                  > > before your intended hike. You might call Kanab Field office
                                  though
                                  > > and see if they are issuing walk-ins?
                                  > >
                                  > > Coyote Buttes Special Permit Offices
                                  > > Arizona Strip Field Office: 345 East Riverside Drive St. George
                                  > > 435.688.3200.
                                  > > Kanab Office: 318 N 100 E 435.644.4600
                                  > > Paria Contact Station: Located south of Highway 89 between mile
                                  post
                                  > > 21 and 22, between Kanab and Page, Az.
                                  > >
                                  > > --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "Shaun"
                                  > > <trackrunner83@> wrote:
                                  > > >
                                  > > > Bump will be down this and next weekends.
                                  > > >
                                  > > >
                                  > > > --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "~tanya"
                                  > > > <gotta@> wrote:
                                  > > > >
                                  > > > >
                                  > > > > I love to hike on snowy days near the Wave. [:p] I want
                                  to
                                  > > go.
                                  > > > >
                                  > > > >
                                  > > > > --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "Shaun"
                                  > > > > <trackrunner83@> wrote:
                                  > > > > >
                                  > > > > > Of course Bo would be awesome to hike with you again. I was
                                  > > > fearful
                                  > > > > > about the permit problem. No calander reservations
                                  available
                                  > > at
                                  > > > all.
                                  > > > > > Hopefully a walk in permitt would be possible.
                                  > > > > >
                                  > > > > > Maybe this would put preasure in increase the permitts? I
                                  bet
                                  > > the
                                  > > > > > crushing interest may just be a fad that will return to
                                  normal
                                  > > > after
                                  > > > > > a few months.
                                  > > > > >
                                  > > > > > Shaun
                                  > > > > >
                                  > > > > > --- In
                                  > > Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "bomabro84738"
                                  > > > > > bbeck@ wrote:
                                  > > > > > >
                                  > > > > > > Just keep me posted and I'd love to get out with you if I
                                  > > can!
                                  > > > > > > I spoke with Linda Price this morning (BLM admistrator
                                  for N
                                  > > > and S
                                  > > > > > > Coyote Buttes) and she said that she was SWAMPED
                                  returning
                                  > > calls
                                  > > > > > > from the media all over the world wanting access to the
                                  Dino.
                                  > > > > > > tracks! I have a feeling that getting a permit to North
                                  > > Coyote
                                  > > > > > > Buttes aka "The Wave" and newly found Dino Tracks is
                                  going
                                  > > to be
                                  > > > > > > really, REALLY tough in the near future! We'll have to
                                  pick
                                  > > out
                                  > > > a
                                  > > > > > > snowy day this winter maybe ;)
                                  > > > >
                                  > > >
                                  > >
                                  >
                                • ~tanya
                                  That must be embarassing for the ones who said they were... head of the University of Utah Palentology Dept right?
                                  Message 16 of 17 , Nov 11, 2008

                                    That must be embarassing for the ones who said they were... head of the University of Utah Palentology Dept right?


                                    --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "bomabro84738" <bbeck@...> wrote:
                                    >
                                    > As we do. Keep looking. It's an absolutely mesermizing place to
                                    > be....dancing dinosaurs or no!
                                    >
                                    > --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "Bill" wmjaho@
                                    > wrote:
                                    > >
                                    > > Here's an article on the subject: http://tinyurl.com/57arrn
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > > --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "bomabro84738"
                                    > > <bbeck@> wrote:
                                    > > >
                                    > > > Bump...spoke with Linda and they had just returned from "Dino"
                                    > > > tracks.......Not! Two paleontologists confirm that they are not
                                    > > > tracks.
                                    > > >
                                    > > > Might be interested in going out there with you though Shaun! Let
                                    > me
                                    > > > know. Permits can be had I believe at Paria Contact station the
                                    > day
                                    > > > before your intended hike. You might call Kanab Field office
                                    > though
                                    > > > and see if they are issuing walk-ins?
                                    > > >
                                    > > > Coyote Buttes Special Permit Offices
                                    > > > Arizona Strip Field Office: 345 East Riverside Drive St. George
                                    > > > 435.688.3200.
                                    > > > Kanab Office: 318 N 100 E 435.644.4600
                                    > > > Paria Contact Station: Located south of Highway 89 between mile
                                    > post
                                    > > > 21 and 22, between Kanab and Page, Az.
                                    > > >
                                    > > > --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "Shaun"
                                    > > > <trackrunner83@> wrote:
                                    > > > >
                                    > > > > Bump will be down this and next weekends.
                                    > > > >
                                    > > > >
                                    > > > > --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "~tanya"
                                    > > > > <gotta@> wrote:
                                    > > > > >
                                    > > > > >
                                    > > > > > I love to hike on snowy days near the Wave. [:p] I want
                                    > to
                                    > > > go.
                                    > > > > >
                                    > > > > >
                                    > > > > > --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "Shaun"
                                    > > > > > <trackrunner83@> wrote:
                                    > > > > > >
                                    > > > > > > Of course Bo would be awesome to hike with you again. I was
                                    > > > > fearful
                                    > > > > > > about the permit problem. No calander reservations
                                    > available
                                    > > > at
                                    > > > > all.
                                    > > > > > > Hopefully a walk in permitt would be possible.
                                    > > > > > >
                                    > > > > > > Maybe this would put preasure in increase the permitts? I
                                    > bet
                                    > > > the
                                    > > > > > > crushing interest may just be a fad that will return to
                                    > normal
                                    > > > > after
                                    > > > > > > a few months.
                                    > > > > > >
                                    > > > > > > Shaun
                                    > > > > > >
                                    > > > > > > --- In
                                    > > > Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "bomabro84738"
                                    > > > > > > bbeck@ wrote:
                                    > > > > > > >
                                    > > > > > > > Just keep me posted and I'd love to get out with you if I
                                    > > > can!
                                    > > > > > > > I spoke with Linda Price this morning (BLM admistrator
                                    > for N
                                    > > > > and S
                                    > > > > > > > Coyote Buttes) and she said that she was SWAMPED
                                    > returning
                                    > > > calls
                                    > > > > > > > from the media all over the world wanting access to the
                                    > Dino.
                                    > > > > > > > tracks! I have a feeling that getting a permit to North
                                    > > > Coyote
                                    > > > > > > > Buttes aka "The Wave" and newly found Dino Tracks is
                                    > going
                                    > > > to be
                                    > > > > > > > really, REALLY tough in the near future! We'll have to
                                    > pick
                                    > > > out
                                    > > > > a
                                    > > > > > > > snowy day this winter maybe ;)
                                    > > > > >
                                    > > > >
                                    > > >
                                    > >
                                    >

                                  • kol84b
                                    ... Actually, that s one of the interesting things about this whole story. It s a couple of geologists -who study rocks - who said they were dinosaur tracks.
                                    Message 17 of 17 , Nov 11, 2008
                                      --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "~tanya" <gotta@...>
                                      wrote:
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > That must be embarassing for the ones who said they were... head of the
                                      > University of Utah Palentology Dept right?
                                      >

                                      Actually, that's one of the interesting things about this whole story.
                                      It's a couple of geologists -who study rocks - who said they were
                                      dinosaur tracks. It's palentologists who said no. Sometimes the line
                                      between the two specialties is a little blurry.
                                      Cliff
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