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Utah national parks may benefit under expanded budget request

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  • ~*~News Today~*~
    Utah s national parks may get an additional $4.6 million based on a proposed $258 million boost to the overall National Park Service budget proposed Monday by
    Message 1 of 2 , Feb 6, 2007
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      Utah's national parks may get an additional $4.6 million based on a proposed $258 million boost to the overall National Park Service budget proposed Monday by the Bush administration.
      Photo
(Deseret Morning News graphic)
      Deseret Morning News graphic
            The increase pushes the National Park Service budget request to $2.4 billion, the largest ever requested, and it is just one part of the president's $2.9 trillion 2008 budget the White House sent to Congress on Monday.
            The four-volume budget book shows Congress where Bush wants tax revenues to go, but it is ultimately up to the members how it will be spent. The budget's release kicks off the annual federal spending process for the next fiscal year.
            In the coming weeks, Cabinet officials will testify before House and Senate committees on what their departments' requests include, and the lawmakers will form spending bills to put the agencies' budgets together.
            Interior Department Secretary Dirk Kempthorne said all 390 national parks would benefit from the proposed $258 million increase over the 2006 levels. Congress did not approve the 2007 Interior Department spending bill. It approved a continuing resolution until Feb. 15, 2007, leaving the federal government running at 2006 budget levels, so comparisons can only be made to the 2006 funding levels.
            In Utah, the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, which also reaches into Arizona, received the biggest proposed increase at $927,000. Zion National Park could get $901,000, Canyonlands National Park may get an additional $896,000 and Bryce National Park has been recommended for a $489,000 increase. In all, Utah's national parks have a $35 million budget request, an increase from the $30 million allotted for 2006.
            The National Park Conservation Association strongly supports the administration's decision to put more money toward the parks.
            "This budget proposal is a victory for all Americans who cherish our heritage and homeland. It is especially important for the citizens, businesses and communities who care for and depend upon Utah's national parks," said NPCA Southwest Regional Director David Nimkin.
       
            Also in the proposed budget, Utah may get $2 million to help restore sagebrush habitat as part of the Bush administration's new Healthy Lands Initiative.
            Kempthorne said this new program's goal is to work on landscape restoration in six Western states — including Utah — that have wildlife habitat and energy resources.
            "This initiative will combine the wildlife-science and land-managing expertise of Interior agencies with the knowledge and experience of local communities to restore and protect working Western landscapes that host both world-class wildlife habitat and world-class energy resources," Kempthorne said.
            Also in the president's budget request:
            • An increase of $8.8 million to the Central Utah Project through the Interior Department, which aims to create a system of dams and aqueducts designed to bring water from the Uinta Basin to the Wasatch Front. President Bush requested $43 million for the project, which is almost $9 million above the 2007 level Congress allowed to continue from 2006 and $2.8 million above the president's request from last year.
            • The 2008 budget proposes $190 million for payment in lieu of taxes (PILT), about $42.5 million below what Congress approved for 2007 and $8 million below the president's previous request. PILT pays local governments for federal land located within the counties on which counties cannot collect taxes.
            "The initial budget number for PILT this year is disappointing, but we will work as we always do to increase that," said Rep. Rob Bishop, R-Utah. "We have to give our Western counties more of their own lands or more financial compensation for having them under federal control."
            Rep. Chris Cannon, R-Utah, said the administration does not seem to understand how PILT funding affects rural Western counties with large amounts of federal land.
            "If they are wondering why the West is turning from red to purple and blue, perhaps showing a bit more respect for those who have to deal with the government's massive presence in our counties and states would help," Cannon said.

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    • ~*~News Today~*~
      Utah s national parks may get an additional $4.6 million based on a proposed $258 million boost to the overall National Park Service budget proposed Monday by
      Message 2 of 2 , Feb 13, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
        Utah's national parks may get an additional $4.6 million based on a proposed $258 million boost to the overall National Park Service budget proposed Monday by the Bush administration.
        Photo (Deseret Morning News graphic)
        Deseret Morning News graphic
              The increase pushes the National Park Service budget request to $2.4 billion, the largest ever requested, and it is just one part of the president's $2.9 trillion 2008 budget the White House sent to Congress on Monday.
              The four-volume budget book shows Congress where Bush wants tax revenues to go, but it is ultimately up to the members how it will be spent. The budget's release kicks off the annual federal spending process for the next fiscal year.
              In the coming weeks, Cabinet officials will testify before House and Senate committees on what their departments' requests include, and the lawmakers will form spending bills to put the agencies' budgets together.
              Interior Department Secretary Dirk Kempthorne said all 390 national parks would benefit from the proposed $258 million increase over the 2006 levels. Congress did not approve the 2007 Interior Department spending bill. It approved a continuing resolution until Feb. 15, 2007, leaving the federal government running at 2006 budget levels, so comparisons can only be made to the 2006 funding levels.
              In Utah, the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, which also reaches into Arizona, received the biggest proposed increase at $927,000. Zion National Park could get $901,000, Canyonlands National Park may get an additional $896,000 and Bryce National Park has been recommended for a $489,000 increase. In all, Utah's national parks have a $35 million budget request, an increase from the $30 million allotted for 2006.
              The National Park Conservation Association strongly supports the administration's decision to put more money toward the parks.
              "This budget proposal is a victory for all Americans who cherish our heritage and homeland. It is especially important for the citizens, businesses and communities who care for and depend upon Utah's national parks," said NPCA Southwest Regional Director David Nimkin.
        Also in the proposed budget, Utah may get $2 million to help restore sagebrush habitat as part of the Bush administration's new Healthy Lands Initiative.
              Kempthorne said this new program's goal is to work on landscape restoration in six Western states — including Utah — that have wildlife habitat and energy resources.
              "This initiative will combine the wildlife-science and land-managing expertise of Interior agencies with the knowledge and experience of local communities to restore and protect working Western landscapes that host both world-class wildlife habitat and world-class energy resources," Kempthorne said.
              Also in the president's budget request:
              • An increase of $8.8 million to the Central Utah Project through the Interior Department, which aims to create a system of dams and aqueducts designed to bring water from the Uinta Basin to the Wasatch Front. President Bush requested $43 million for the project, which is almost $9 million above the 2007 level Congress allowed to continue from 2006 and $2.8 million above the president's request from last year.
              • The 2008 budget proposes $190 million for payment in lieu of taxes (PILT), about $42.5 million below what Congress approved for 2007 and $8 million below the president's previous request. PILT pays local governments for federal land located within the counties on which counties cannot collect taxes.
              "The initial budget number for PILT this year is disappointing, but we will work as we always do to increase that," said Rep. Rob Bishop, R-Utah. "We have to give our Western counties more of their own lands or more financial compensation for having them under federal control."
              Rep. Chris Cannon, R-Utah, said the administration does not seem to understand how PILT funding affects rural Western counties with large amounts of federal land.
              "If they are wondering why the West is turning from red to purple and blue, perhaps showing a bit more respect for those who have to deal with the government's massive presence in our counties and states would help," Cannon said.

        http://deseretnews.com/dn/view/0,1249,660193072,00.html


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