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Re: Technical Question

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  • Steve
    In the Southwest, I normally set my camera to underexpose 1/3 stop. (I have my exposure gradients set to 1/3, not 1/2 stop, for more precise control.) Near
    Message 1 of 7 , Apr 30, 2006
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      In the Southwest, I normally set my camera to underexpose 1/3 stop. (I
      have my exposure gradients set to 1/3, not 1/2 stop, for more precise
      control.)

      Near midday, I'll drop that to 2/3 stop underexposure. If you're using
      digital, it's easy to bracket exposures, as well.

      Following up on what other people have said, I see that you have a
      point and shoot digital.

      Always have your saturation at +1 above the default. In the Southwest,
      especially shooting near noon, it should be +2.

      Next piece of advice; don't shoot between 10am-2pm (11am-3pm in DST).
      Even with a digital SLR and Photoshopping, there's only so much you
      can get out of such pictures.

      Finally, I'm going to recommend a book: "Natural Park Photography," by
      Tim Fitzhaus. In addition to time of day suggestions like mine, he'll
      tell you the best seasons of the year to shoot at selected spots in
      all major U.S. National Parks.

      Steve
      >
      > Take a look at the photos I posted and let me know how to improve
      > them. They seem to be washed out, colors not vibrant.
      >
      > I shot them with manual settings, ISO100.
      >
      > Today I'm going to try manual at ISO50 and also auto. Switching back
      > and forth may give me a better idea. I wonder also if adjusting the
      > white balance might help.
      >
      > I'll some photos later.
      >
      > bruce from bryce
      >
    • bruce silliman
      And a thanks to you also Steve. The best picture I posted, the one of the formations from the car was at about 3pm so it was a nicer photo. I need to start
      Message 2 of 7 , May 1, 2006
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        And a thanks to you also Steve. The best picture I posted, the one of the
        formations from the car was at about 3pm so it was a nicer photo.
        I need to start taking time to think these things out prior to the shot. If
        I can get it down outside with full light then I can work on shooting in
        canyons, which is a whole new ball game.

        bruce from bruce


        >From: "Steve" <socraticgadfly@...>
        >Reply-To: Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com
        >To: Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com
        >Subject: [Zion_National_Park_Hiking] Re: Technical Question
        >Date: Mon, 01 May 2006 06:24:12 -0000
        >
        >In the Southwest, I normally set my camera to underexpose 1/3 stop. (I
        >have my exposure gradients set to 1/3, not 1/2 stop, for more precise
        >control.)
        >
        >Near midday, I'll drop that to 2/3 stop underexposure. If you're using
        >digital, it's easy to bracket exposures, as well.
        >
        >Following up on what other people have said, I see that you have a
        >point and shoot digital.
        >
        >Always have your saturation at +1 above the default. In the Southwest,
        >especially shooting near noon, it should be +2.
        >
        >Next piece of advice; don't shoot between 10am-2pm (11am-3pm in DST).
        >Even with a digital SLR and Photoshopping, there's only so much you
        >can get out of such pictures.
        >
        >Finally, I'm going to recommend a book: "Natural Park Photography," by
        >Tim Fitzhaus. In addition to time of day suggestions like mine, he'll
        >tell you the best seasons of the year to shoot at selected spots in
        >all major U.S. National Parks.
        >
        >Steve
        > >
        > > Take a look at the photos I posted and let me know how to improve
        > > them. They seem to be washed out, colors not vibrant.
        > >
        > > I shot them with manual settings, ISO100.
        > >
        > > Today I'm going to try manual at ISO50 and also auto. Switching back
        > > and forth may give me a better idea. I wonder also if adjusting the
        > > white balance might help.
        > >
        > > I'll some photos later.
        > >
        > > bruce from bryce
        > >
        >
        >
        >
        >
      • JoeB
        On long hikes, sometimes I hate having to shoot a beautiful spot during the dead hours (roughly 11am to 3pm). Late afternoon is always the most beautiful (and
        Message 3 of 7 , May 1, 2006
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          On long hikes, sometimes I hate having to shoot a beautiful spot
          during the dead hours (roughly 11am to 3pm). Late afternoon is always
          the most beautiful (and early morning is beautiful in some cases). And
          I often wind up hiking out in the dark because I wanted to get some
          cool sunset shot in the middle of nowhere.

          Fall is the BEST because you get all of that wonderful warm angled
          light throughout the day! Now, I'm still trying to figure out how to
          take all of my good photo gear into the tech canyons without killing
          them or annoying my partners with how slow I am! :)

          --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "bruce silliman"
          <weabruce@...> wrote:
          >
          > And a thanks to you also Steve. The best picture I posted, the one
          of the
          > formations from the car was at about 3pm so it was a nicer photo.
          > I need to start taking time to think these things out prior to the
          shot. If
          > I can get it down outside with full light then I can work on
          shooting in
          > canyons, which is a whole new ball game.
          >
          > bruce from bruce
          >
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