Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Coral Pink Sand Dunes

Expand Messages
  • zion_national_park_hiking
    11 miles from Mount Carmel Junction on the East side of Zion Long a favorite of dune-buggy enthusiasts, Coral Pink Sand Dunes has recently been attracting an
    Message 1 of 22 , Mar 22, 2005
      11 miles from Mount Carmel Junction on the East side of Zion

      Long a favorite of dune-buggy enthusiasts, Coral Pink Sand Dunes has recently been
      attracting an increasing number of campers, hikers, photographers, and all-around nature
      lovers as well. While big boys -- and occasionally big girls -- play with their expensive
      motorized toys, others hike; hunt for wildflowers, scorpions, and lizards; or just sit and
      wiggle their toes in the smooth, cool sand. The colors are especially rich at sunrise and
      sunset. Early-morning visitors will find the tracks of yesterday's dune buggies gone,
      replaced by the tracks of lizards, kangaroo rats, snakes, and the rest of the park's animal
      kingdom, who venture out in the coolness of night, once all the people have departed.


      Just the Facts


      At about 6,000 feet elevation, the park gets warm in summer, with temperatures easily
      reaching the mid 90s Fahrenheit (in the neighborhood of 32°C). Winters are usually
      relatively mild, although snow and bitter cold temperatures are not unheard of. Our choice
      for a visit is May, June, September, or October, when it's delightfully cool at night but
      warm enough during the day to enjoy burying your toes in the cooling sand. There are
      also fewer people there at those times.


      Getting There -- From Zion National Park, take Utah 9 east to U.S. 89, turn right (south)
      and continue to the park entrance road. From downtown Kanab, go about 8 miles north on
      U.S. 89, then southwest (left) on Hancock Road for about 12 miles to get to the park.


      IInformation & Visitor Center -- For copies of the park brochure and off-highway-vehicle
      regulations, contact the park office at P.O. Box 95, Kanab, UT 84741-0095 (tel. 435/648
      -2800). Information is also available online at www.stateparks.utah.gov. At the park entry
      station, which also serves as a visitor center, you'll see a small display area with sand from
      around the world, fossils from the area, and live scorpions, lizards, and tadpoles. This is
      the place to find out about ranger programs.


      Fees & Regulations -- The day-use fee is $5 per vehicle. The standard state park
      regulations apply, with the addition of a few extra rules due to the park's popularity with
      off-road-vehicle users. Quiet hours last from 10pm to 9am. The dunes are open to motor
      vehicles between 9am and 10pm and to hikers at any time. Vehicles going onto the dunes
      must have safety flags, available at the entry station; while on the dunes, they must stay at
      least 10 feet from vegetation and at least 100 feet from hikers. Dogs are permitted on the
      dunes but must be leashed.


      Ranger Programs -- Regularly scheduled ranger talks explain the geology, plants, and
      animals of the dunes. For a real thrill, take a guided evening Scorpion Walk, using a black
      light to find the luminescent scorpions that make the park their home. You'll definitely
      want to wear shoes for this activity! Call to find out if there's a Scorpion Walk scheduled
      during your visit.


      Outdoor Pursuits


      Camping -- The spacious and mostly shady 22-site campground, open year-round, offers
      hot showers, modern restrooms, and an RV dump station, but no hookups. Camping costs
      $14. Call tel. 800/322-3770 or visit the state park website at www.stateparks.utah.gov for
      reservations, with a $7 non-refundable reservation fee.


      Hiking -- The best time for hiking the dunes is early morning, for several reasons: It's
      cooler, the lighting at and just after sunrise produces beautiful shadows and colors, and
      there are no noisy dune buggies until after 9am. Sunset is also very pretty, but you'll be
      sharing the dunes with off-road vehicles. Keep in mind that hiking through fine sand can
      be very tiring, especially for those who go barefoot. A self-guided half-mile loop nature
      trail has numbered signs through some of the dunes; allow a half hour.


      Several other hikes of various lengths are possible within and just outside the park, but
      because there are few signs -- and because landmarks change with the shifting sands --
      it's best to check with park rangers before setting out. Those spending more than a few
      hours in the dunes will discover that even their own tracks disappear in the wind, leaving
      few clues to the route back to park headquarters.


      Off-Roading -- This giant sandbox offers plenty of space for off-road-vehicle enthusiasts.
      Because the sand here is quite fine, extra-wide flotation tires are needed, and lightweight
      dune buggies are usually the vehicle of choice. If exploring the park itself isn't enough for
      you, adjacent to the park on Bureau of Land Management property, you'll find hundreds of
      miles of trails and roads for off-highway vehicles.


      <http://www.frommers.com/destinations/zionnationalpark/1560026214.html>
    • JoeB
      Very cute picture! You have me intrigued to check out the dunes, but will us hikers get run over by hundreds of Mad Max style dune buggies and race cars? It s
      Message 2 of 22 , Mar 22, 2005
        Very cute picture!

        You have me intrigued to check out the dunes, but will us hikers get
        run over by hundreds of Mad Max style dune buggies and race cars?
        It's not really that crazy, is it? Will we have to make a mad dash
        to the cliffs of Pweap before we get run over?


        --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com,
        zion_national_park_hiking <no_reply@y...> wrote:
        >
        > 11 miles from Mount Carmel Junction on the East side of Zion
        >
        > Long a favorite of dune-buggy enthusiasts, Coral Pink Sand Dunes
        has recently been
        > attracting an increasing number of campers, hikers, photographers,
        and all-around nature
        > lovers as well. While big boys -- and occasionally big girls --
        play with their expensive
        > motorized toys, others hike; hunt for wildflowers, scorpions, and
        lizards; or just sit and
        > wiggle their toes in the smooth, cool sand. The colors are
        especially rich at sunrise and
        > sunset. Early-morning visitors will find the tracks of yesterday's
        dune buggies gone,
        > replaced by the tracks of lizards, kangaroo rats, snakes, and the
        rest of the park's animal
        > kingdom, who venture out in the coolness of night, once all the
        people have departed.
        >
        >
        > Just the Facts
        >
        >
        > At about 6,000 feet elevation, the park gets warm in summer, with
        temperatures easily
        > reaching the mid 90s Fahrenheit (in the neighborhood of 32°C).
        Winters are usually
        > relatively mild, although snow and bitter cold temperatures are
        not unheard of. Our choice
        > for a visit is May, June, September, or October, when it's
        delightfully cool at night but
        > warm enough during the day to enjoy burying your toes in the
        cooling sand. There are
        > also fewer people there at those times.
        >
        >
        > Getting There -- From Zion National Park, take Utah 9 east to U.S.
        89, turn right (south)
        > and continue to the park entrance road. From downtown Kanab, go
        about 8 miles north on
        > U.S. 89, then southwest (left) on Hancock Road for about 12 miles
        to get to the park.
        >
        >
        > IInformation & Visitor Center -- For copies of the park brochure
        and off-highway-vehicle
        > regulations, contact the park office at P.O. Box 95, Kanab, UT
        84741-0095 (tel. 435/648
        > -2800). Information is also available online at
        www.stateparks.utah.gov. At the park entry
        > station, which also serves as a visitor center, you'll see a small
        display area with sand from
        > around the world, fossils from the area, and live scorpions,
        lizards, and tadpoles. This is
        > the place to find out about ranger programs.
        >
        >
        > Fees & Regulations -- The day-use fee is $5 per vehicle. The
        standard state park
        > regulations apply, with the addition of a few extra rules due to
        the park's popularity with
        > off-road-vehicle users. Quiet hours last from 10pm to 9am. The
        dunes are open to motor
        > vehicles between 9am and 10pm and to hikers at any time. Vehicles
        going onto the dunes
        > must have safety flags, available at the entry station; while on
        the dunes, they must stay at
        > least 10 feet from vegetation and at least 100 feet from hikers.
        Dogs are permitted on the
        > dunes but must be leashed.
        >
        >
        > Ranger Programs -- Regularly scheduled ranger talks explain the
        geology, plants, and
        > animals of the dunes. For a real thrill, take a guided evening
        Scorpion Walk, using a black
        > light to find the luminescent scorpions that make the park their
        home. You'll definitely
        > want to wear shoes for this activity! Call to find out if there's
        a Scorpion Walk scheduled
        > during your visit.
        >
        >
        > Outdoor Pursuits
        >
        >
        > Camping -- The spacious and mostly shady 22-site campground, open
        year-round, offers
        > hot showers, modern restrooms, and an RV dump station, but no
        hookups. Camping costs
        > $14. Call tel. 800/322-3770 or visit the state park website at
        www.stateparks.utah.gov for
        > reservations, with a $7 non-refundable reservation fee.
        >
        >
        > Hiking -- The best time for hiking the dunes is early morning, for
        several reasons: It's
        > cooler, the lighting at and just after sunrise produces beautiful
        shadows and colors, and
        > there are no noisy dune buggies until after 9am. Sunset is also
        very pretty, but you'll be
        > sharing the dunes with off-road vehicles. Keep in mind that hiking
        through fine sand can
        > be very tiring, especially for those who go barefoot. A self-
        guided half-mile loop nature
        > trail has numbered signs through some of the dunes; allow a half
        hour.
        >
        >
        > Several other hikes of various lengths are possible within and
        just outside the park, but
        > because there are few signs -- and because landmarks change with
        the shifting sands --
        > it's best to check with park rangers before setting out. Those
        spending more than a few
        > hours in the dunes will discover that even their own tracks
        disappear in the wind, leaving
        > few clues to the route back to park headquarters.
        >
        >
        > Off-Roading -- This giant sandbox offers plenty of space for off-
        road-vehicle enthusiasts.
        > Because the sand here is quite fine, extra-wide flotation tires
        are needed, and lightweight
        > dune buggies are usually the vehicle of choice. If exploring the
        park itself isn't enough for
        > you, adjacent to the park on Bureau of Land Management property,
        you'll find hundreds of
        > miles of trails and roads for off-highway vehicles.
        >
        >
        >
        <http://www.frommers.com/destinations/zionnationalpark/1560026214.htm
        l>
      • luvs_to_hike
        Its fun out there. When i went last year there were 2 teen boys getting buried up to their necks. The ATVs have to stay on the trails and beyond the fenced,
        Message 3 of 22 , Mar 22, 2005
          Its fun out there. When i went last year there were 2 teen boys getting buried up to their
          necks. The ATVs have to stay on the trails and beyond the fenced, foot traffic area. You
          are safe. ;)

          When we went Sunday the weather was miserable. The heater broke on the truck too! We
          had 7 kids in the back, no heat and it was just horribly cold.

          Bo and my 7 year old got out in that cold and raced. On the drive back is was like 3
          different weather zones. One area was getting drenched by snow!

          If you go check out South Canyon Indian Pictographs! 4WD needed.
          http://www.zionnational-park.com/moquith-mountain.htm



          --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "JoeB" <joe@c...> wrote:
          >
          > Very cute picture!
          >
          > You have me intrigued to check out the dunes, but will us hikers get
          > run over by hundreds of Mad Max style dune buggies and race cars?
          > It's not really that crazy, is it? Will we have to make a mad dash
          > to the cliffs of Pweap before we get run over?
          >
          >
          > --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com,
          > zion_national_park_hiking <no_reply@y...> wrote:
          > >
          > > 11 miles from Mount Carmel Junction on the East side of Zion
          > >
          > > Long a favorite of dune-buggy enthusiasts, Coral Pink Sand Dunes
          > has recently been
          > > attracting an increasing number of campers, hikers, photographers,
          > and all-around nature
          > > lovers as well. While big boys -- and occasionally big girls --
          > play with their expensive
          > > motorized toys, others hike; hunt for wildflowers, scorpions, and
          > lizards; or just sit and
          > > wiggle their toes in the smooth, cool sand. The colors are
          > especially rich at sunrise and
          > > sunset. Early-morning visitors will find the tracks of yesterday's
          > dune buggies gone,
          > > replaced by the tracks of lizards, kangaroo rats, snakes, and the
          > rest of the park's animal
          > > kingdom, who venture out in the coolness of night, once all the
          > people have departed.
          > >
          > >
          > > Just the Facts
          > >
          > >
          > > At about 6,000 feet elevation, the park gets warm in summer, with
          > temperatures easily
          > > reaching the mid 90s Fahrenheit (in the neighborhood of 32°C).
          > Winters are usually
          > > relatively mild, although snow and bitter cold temperatures are
          > not unheard of. Our choice
          > > for a visit is May, June, September, or October, when it's
          > delightfully cool at night but
          > > warm enough during the day to enjoy burying your toes in the
          > cooling sand. There are
          > > also fewer people there at those times.
          > >
          > >
          > > Getting There -- From Zion National Park, take Utah 9 east to U.S.
          > 89, turn right (south)
          > > and continue to the park entrance road. From downtown Kanab, go
          > about 8 miles north on
          > > U.S. 89, then southwest (left) on Hancock Road for about 12 miles
          > to get to the park.
          > >
          > >
          > > IInformation & Visitor Center -- For copies of the park brochure
          > and off-highway-vehicle
          > > regulations, contact the park office at P.O. Box 95, Kanab, UT
          > 84741-0095 (tel. 435/648
          > > -2800). Information is also available online at
          > www.stateparks.utah.gov. At the park entry
          > > station, which also serves as a visitor center, you'll see a small
          > display area with sand from
          > > around the world, fossils from the area, and live scorpions,
          > lizards, and tadpoles. This is
          > > the place to find out about ranger programs.
          > >
          > >
          > > Fees & Regulations -- The day-use fee is $5 per vehicle. The
          > standard state park
          > > regulations apply, with the addition of a few extra rules due to
          > the park's popularity with
          > > off-road-vehicle users. Quiet hours last from 10pm to 9am. The
          > dunes are open to motor
          > > vehicles between 9am and 10pm and to hikers at any time. Vehicles
          > going onto the dunes
          > > must have safety flags, available at the entry station; while on
          > the dunes, they must stay at
          > > least 10 feet from vegetation and at least 100 feet from hikers.
          > Dogs are permitted on the
          > > dunes but must be leashed.
          > >
          > >
          > > Ranger Programs -- Regularly scheduled ranger talks explain the
          > geology, plants, and
          > > animals of the dunes. For a real thrill, take a guided evening
          > Scorpion Walk, using a black
          > > light to find the luminescent scorpions that make the park their
          > home. You'll definitely
          > > want to wear shoes for this activity! Call to find out if there's
          > a Scorpion Walk scheduled
          > > during your visit.
          > >
          > >
          > > Outdoor Pursuits
          > >
          > >
          > > Camping -- The spacious and mostly shady 22-site campground, open
          > year-round, offers
          > > hot showers, modern restrooms, and an RV dump station, but no
          > hookups. Camping costs
          > > $14. Call tel. 800/322-3770 or visit the state park website at
          > www.stateparks.utah.gov for
          > > reservations, with a $7 non-refundable reservation fee.
          > >
          > >
          > > Hiking -- The best time for hiking the dunes is early morning, for
          > several reasons: It's
          > > cooler, the lighting at and just after sunrise produces beautiful
          > shadows and colors, and
          > > there are no noisy dune buggies until after 9am. Sunset is also
          > very pretty, but you'll be
          > > sharing the dunes with off-road vehicles. Keep in mind that hiking
          > through fine sand can
          > > be very tiring, especially for those who go barefoot. A self-
          > guided half-mile loop nature
          > > trail has numbered signs through some of the dunes; allow a half
          > hour.
          > >
          > >
          > > Several other hikes of various lengths are possible within and
          > just outside the park, but
          > > because there are few signs -- and because landmarks change with
          > the shifting sands --
          > > it's best to check with park rangers before setting out. Those
          > spending more than a few
          > > hours in the dunes will discover that even their own tracks
          > disappear in the wind, leaving
          > > few clues to the route back to park headquarters.
          > >
          > >
          > > Off-Roading -- This giant sandbox offers plenty of space for off-
          > road-vehicle enthusiasts.
          > > Because the sand here is quite fine, extra-wide flotation tires
          > are needed, and lightweight
          > > dune buggies are usually the vehicle of choice. If exploring the
          > park itself isn't enough for
          > > you, adjacent to the park on Bureau of Land Management property,
          > you'll find hundreds of
          > > miles of trails and roads for off-highway vehicles.
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > <http://www.frommers.com/destinations/zionnationalpark/1560026214.htm
          > l>
        • zion_national_park_hiking
          It s 9 a.m. when we drive a Yamaha Rhino 660 onto the flourlike sand of Coral Pink Sand Dune State Park and out of sight of our Ford F-350 Super Duty Crew Cab
          Message 4 of 22 , Apr 15 10:29 AM
            It's 9 a.m. when we drive a Yamaha Rhino 660 onto the flourlike sand
            of Coral Pink Sand
            Dune State Park and out of sight of our Ford F-350 Super Duty Crew
            Cab 4x4. On the back
            of the truck is a Lance camper, which serves as our home on wheels
            during this adventure.

            Coral Pink is a seven-mile-long, half-mile-wide sliver of
            southwestern Utah real estate.
            It's at the base of the famous Utah Steps, a geological formation of
            Navajo sandstone that
            leads into Zion National Park to the northwest and Grand
            Staircase-Escalante National
            Monument to the northeast.

            The dune complex is actually a valley in a deep notch between the
            Moquith Mountains to
            the east and the Moccasin Mountains to the north. Its location serves
            as a natural
            collection area for the fine sands blown off the surrounding
            mountains' steep red cliffs and
            outcroppings.





            The lower 1200 acres are under the protection of the Utah State Parks
            Department; the
            larger, upper portion of the dunes and the surrounding land are under
            BLM control.





            The park itself is a year 'round recreational area, perfect for those
            who enjoy playing with
            their motorized toys in a giant sandbox. Well, maybe not year 'round.
            "Spring, early
            summer, and fall are really the most ideal times to ride in the
            Pink," says Michael Frank,
            the park's head ranger. "During the heat of summer, temperatures can
            easily top 100
            degrees. That kind of heat, combined with our altitude (6000-foot
            elevation) can make it
            uncomfortable for those who aren't used to such conditions."




            continued
            http://trucktrend.com/features/travel/163_0410_ontheroad/
          • dstriek
            How do these vehicles and people walking on the dunes manage to coexist? any incidents? i was thinking about making a little trip to check out the Dunes on our
            Message 5 of 22 , Apr 15 6:51 PM
              How do these vehicles and people walking on the dunes manage to
              coexist? any incidents?

              i was thinking about making a little trip to check out the Dunes on
              our trip, but am beginning to wonder if its a wise idea on foot.

              --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com,
              zion_national_park_hiking <no_reply@y...> wrote:
              >
              > It's 9 a.m. when we drive a Yamaha Rhino 660 onto the flourlike sand
              > of Coral Pink Sand
              > Dune State Park and out of sight of our Ford F-350 Super Duty Crew
              > Cab 4x4. On the back
              > of the truck is a Lance camper, which serves as our home on wheels
              > during this adventure.
              >
              > Coral Pink is a seven-mile-long, half-mile-wide sliver of
              > southwestern Utah real estate.
              > It's at the base of the famous Utah Steps, a geological formation of
              > Navajo sandstone that
              > leads into Zion National Park to the northwest and Grand
              > Staircase-Escalante National
              > Monument to the northeast.
              >
              > The dune complex is actually a valley in a deep notch between the
              > Moquith Mountains to
              > the east and the Moccasin Mountains to the north. Its location
              serves
              > as a natural
              > collection area for the fine sands blown off the surrounding
              > mountains' steep red cliffs and
              > outcroppings.
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > The lower 1200 acres are under the protection of the Utah State
              Parks
              > Department; the
              > larger, upper portion of the dunes and the surrounding land are
              under
              > BLM control.
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > The park itself is a year 'round recreational area, perfect for
              those
              > who enjoy playing with
              > their motorized toys in a giant sandbox. Well, maybe not
              year 'round.
              > "Spring, early
              > summer, and fall are really the most ideal times to ride in the
              > Pink," says Michael Frank,
              > the park's head ranger. "During the heat of summer, temperatures can
              > easily top 100
              > degrees. That kind of heat, combined with our altitude (6000-foot
              > elevation) can make it
              > uncomfortable for those who aren't used to such conditions."
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > continued
              > http://trucktrend.com/features/travel/163_0410_ontheroad/
            • kip66666
              Hi, I wouldn t not do it, but two years ago we were hiking during the summer (not a holiday period) in what I recall was clearly designated as the hiking area
              Message 6 of 22 , Apr 15 7:41 PM
                Hi,

                I wouldn't not do it, but two years ago we were hiking during the
                summer (not a holiday period) in what I recall was clearly
                designated as the hiking area of the dunes when the buggies
                flew over the top of the dune about 75-100 feet in front of us. We
                weren't in imminent danger, but we weren't very pleased, either.
                The dunes are lovely. It is a shame that hiking in them is so
                precarious, based on our experince.

                Kip


                --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, dstriek
                <no_reply@y...> wrote:
                >
                > How do these vehicles and people walking on the dunes
                manage to
                > coexist? any incidents?
                >
                > i was thinking about making a little trip to check out the Dunes
                on
                > our trip, but am beginning to wonder if its a wise idea on foot.
                >
              • luvs_to_hike
                Hi :) There is a boundry... a little wooden fence, but the ATVs, from what I have seen, never go near the fence. Walkers do however. Most of the ATVs are on a
                Message 7 of 22 , Apr 15 8:11 PM
                  Hi :)

                  There is a boundry... a little wooden fence, but the ATVs, from what I have seen, never go
                  near the fence. Walkers do however.

                  Most of the ATVs are on a special serious of trails are far from the walkers.

                  It's perfectly safe.

                  Photo of the fence
                  http://www.zionnational-park.com/sdhike.htm

                  --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, dstriek <no_reply@y...> wrote:
                  >
                  > How do these vehicles and people walking on the dunes manage to
                  > coexist? any incidents?
                  >
                  > i was thinking about making a little trip to check out the Dunes on
                  > our trip, but am beginning to wonder if its a wise idea on foot.
                • luvs_to_hike
                  I have been out there a lot and the ATVs are always so far away that I cant even hear them. My kids run all over and play and they are perfectly safe. No one
                  Message 8 of 22 , Apr 15 8:13 PM
                    I have been out there a lot and the ATVs are always so far away that I cant even hear them.
                    My kids run all over and play and they are perfectly safe.

                    No one is safe on those moterized contraptions though! ;)

                    I am not a fan of ATVs but the dunes is a safe place for them to be where they do not tear
                    up the land and are safe. ATV riders do need some place to go.



                    --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "kip66666" <sigetich@o...> wrote:
                    >
                    >
                    > Hi,
                    >
                    > I wouldn't not do it, but two years ago we were hiking during the
                    > summer (not a holiday period) in what I recall was clearly
                    > designated as the hiking area of the dunes when the buggies
                    > flew over the top of the dune about 75-100 feet in front of us. We
                    > weren't in imminent danger, but we weren't very pleased, either.
                    > The dunes are lovely. It is a shame that hiking in them is so
                    > precarious, based on our experince.
                    >
                    > Kip
                  • Lisa Armstrong
                    We had the same experience. The two different areas are very clearly marked, but they are not always respected by the dune buggy riders. And, even when they
                    Message 9 of 22 , Apr 15 8:32 PM
                      We had the same experience. The two different areas are very clearly
                      marked, but they are not always respected by the dune buggy riders. And,
                      even when they are, there is a lot of noise to put up with while you're
                      enjoying your hike.

                      Lisa
                      *gently used textbooks for all your educational needs*
                      http://stores.ebay.com/ScholarTimes-Used-Textbooks_W0QQsspagenameZl2QQtZkm

                      -----Original Message-----
                      From: Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com
                      [mailto:Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of kip66666
                      Sent: Friday, April 15, 2005 8:41 PM
                      To: Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com
                      Subject: [Zion_National_Park_Hiking] Re: Coral Pink Sand Dunes




                      Hi,

                      I wouldn't not do it, but two years ago we were hiking during the
                      summer (not a holiday period) in what I recall was clearly
                      designated as the hiking area of the dunes when the buggies
                      flew over the top of the dune about 75-100 feet in front of us. We
                      weren't in imminent danger, but we weren't very pleased, either.
                      The dunes are lovely. It is a shame that hiking in them is so
                      precarious, based on our experince.

                      Kip


                      --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, dstriek
                      <no_reply@y...> wrote:
                      >
                      > How do these vehicles and people walking on the dunes
                      manage to
                      > coexist? any incidents?
                      >
                      > i was thinking about making a little trip to check out the Dunes
                      on
                      > our trip, but am beginning to wonder if its a wise idea on foot.
                      >









                      If you would like to read posts on the net instead of taking email: Visit
                      us on the web
                      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Zion_National_Park_Hiking/

                      To stop mail:
                      http://groups.yahoo.com/mygroups?sort=m&order=a&page=1&edit=1



                      ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
                      --
                      Yahoo! Groups Links

                      a.. To visit your group on the web, go to:
                      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Zion_National_Park_Hiking/

                      b.. To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                      Zion_National_Park_Hiking-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

                      c.. Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.



                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Lisa Armstrong
                      It is true that they need somewhere to go where they are not tearing up the flora and fauna. :) Maybe it depends on where you are. The ATVs were very close
                      Message 10 of 22 , Apr 15 8:32 PM
                        It is true that they need somewhere to go where they are not tearing up the
                        flora and fauna. :) Maybe it depends on where you are. The ATVs were very
                        close to us and we were on the hiking part.

                        Lisa
                        *gently used textbooks for all your educational needs*
                        http://stores.ebay.com/ScholarTimes-Used-Textbooks_W0QQsspagenameZl2QQtZkm

                        -----Original Message-----
                        From: Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com
                        [mailto:Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of luvs_to_hike
                        Sent: Friday, April 15, 2005 9:14 PM
                        To: Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com
                        Subject: [Zion_National_Park_Hiking] Re: Coral Pink Sand Dunes



                        I have been out there a lot and the ATVs are always so far away that I
                        cant even hear them.
                        My kids run all over and play and they are perfectly safe.

                        No one is safe on those moterized contraptions though! ;)

                        I am not a fan of ATVs but the dunes is a safe place for them to be where
                        they do not tear
                        up the land and are safe. ATV riders do need some place to go.



                        --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "kip66666"
                        <sigetich@o...> wrote:
                        >
                        >
                        > Hi,
                        >
                        > I wouldn't not do it, but two years ago we were hiking during the
                        > summer (not a holiday period) in what I recall was clearly
                        > designated as the hiking area of the dunes when the buggies
                        > flew over the top of the dune about 75-100 feet in front of us. We
                        > weren't in imminent danger, but we weren't very pleased, either.
                        > The dunes are lovely. It is a shame that hiking in them is so
                        > precarious, based on our experince.
                        >
                        > Kip






                        If you would like to read posts on the net instead of taking email: Visit
                        us on the web
                        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Zion_National_Park_Hiking/

                        To stop mail:
                        http://groups.yahoo.com/mygroups?sort=m&order=a&page=1&edit=1



                        ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
                        --
                        Yahoo! Groups Links

                        a.. To visit your group on the web, go to:
                        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Zion_National_Park_Hiking/

                        b.. To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                        Zion_National_Park_Hiking-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

                        c.. Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.



                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • luvs_to_hike
                        Try this ATV free (I think) zone for hiking at the dunes :) This is a nice hike to some pictographs
                        Message 11 of 22 , Apr 15 10:02 PM
                          Try this ATV free (I think) zone for hiking at the dunes :)

                          This is a nice hike to some pictographs

                          <http://www.zionnational-park.com/moquith-mountain.htm>

                          --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "Lisa Armstrong" <lisa@a...> wrote:
                          > We had the same experience. The two different areas are very clearly
                          > marked, but they are not always respected by the dune buggy riders. And,
                          > even when they are, there is a lot of noise to put up with while you're
                          > enjoying your hike.
                          >
                          > Lisa
                          > *gently used textbooks for all your educational needs*
                          > http://stores.ebay.com/ScholarTimes-Used-Textbooks_W0QQsspagenameZl2QQtZkm
                        • bsilliman2001
                          I ve been told that there is a backcountry road from in the vicinity of Organ Pipe NM that goes north through the Coral Pink Sand Dunes and exits onto Highway
                          Message 12 of 22 , Jan 25, 2006
                            I've been told that there is a backcountry road from in the vicinity
                            of Organ Pipe NM that goes north through the Coral Pink Sand Dunes and
                            exits onto Highway 89.

                            What condition is this road in?
                            Is 4x4 required?
                            Would a mini-van be able to make it through?

                            Thanks,

                            bruce from bryce
                          • Dean Kurtz
                            ... Organ Pipe? I think you have your national monuments confused. Is it possible that you mean Pipe Springs? If so, here it is: One road from Pipe Springs
                            Message 13 of 22 , Jan 25, 2006
                              >I've been told that there is a backcountry road from in the vicinity of
                              >Organ Pipe NM that goes north through the Coral Pink Sand Dunes and exits
                              >onto Highway 89.<

                              Organ Pipe? I think you have your national monuments confused. Is it
                              possible that you mean Pipe Springs? If so, here it is: One road from Pipe
                              Springs to the Sand Dunes, then through them, gets you to the county road
                              that connects to Highway 89. Not possible in anything but a 4x4 or (better)
                              ATV, also not legal. This road crosses Kaibab Paiute land and is gated and
                              locked, and they are VERY particular about who gets through. Second road
                              actually connects Cane Beds on Highway 389 in Arizona ('bout 4 miles south
                              of that famous hamlet of Colorado City) to Highway 89 via the county road
                              through Coral Pink Sand Dunes. This road is paved from Highway 89 to the
                              Arizona border, and from Highway 389 to some point north, though I'm not
                              sure where as this improvement was made within the last 2 months and I have
                              not been through since. The way the road was it could be done with a
                              mini-van, if you were very careful about avoiding sand pits or if the road
                              was damp (not wet).

                              Dean
                            • luvs_to_hike
                              No clue? There is a fun and scenic road that comes in from highway 389 and goes through to highway 89. For this road its okay for a 2WD as long as its not
                              Message 14 of 22 , Jan 25, 2006
                                No clue? There is a fun and scenic road that comes in from highway 389 and goes
                                through to highway 89. For this road its okay for a 2WD as long as its not wet.

                                --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "bsilliman2001" <weabruce@h...>
                                wrote:
                                >
                                > I've been told that there is a backcountry road from in the vicinity
                                > of Organ Pipe NM that goes north through the Coral Pink Sand Dunes and
                                > exits onto Highway 89.
                                >
                                > What condition is this road in?
                                > Is 4x4 required?
                                > Would a mini-van be able to make it through?
                                >
                                > Thanks,
                                >
                                > bruce from bryce
                                >
                              • luvs_to_hike
                                What is Cane Beds?
                                Message 15 of 22 , Jan 25, 2006
                                  What is "Cane Beds?"

                                  --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "Dean Kurtz" <dkurtz@x...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  > >I've been told that there is a backcountry road from in the vicinity of
                                  > >Organ Pipe NM that goes north through the Coral Pink Sand Dunes and exits
                                  > >onto Highway 89.<
                                  >
                                  > Organ Pipe? I think you have your national monuments confused. Is it
                                  > possible that you mean Pipe Springs? If so, here it is: One road from Pipe
                                  > Springs to the Sand Dunes, then through them, gets you to the county road
                                  > that connects to Highway 89. Not possible in anything but a 4x4 or (better)
                                  > ATV, also not legal. This road crosses Kaibab Paiute land and is gated and
                                  > locked, and they are VERY particular about who gets through. Second road
                                  > actually connects Cane Beds on Highway 389 in Arizona ('bout 4 miles south
                                  > of that famous hamlet of Colorado City) to Highway 89 via the county road
                                  > through Coral Pink Sand Dunes. This road is paved from Highway 89 to the
                                  > Arizona border, and from Highway 389 to some point north, though I'm not
                                  > sure where as this improvement was made within the last 2 months and I have
                                  > not been through since. The way the road was it could be done with a
                                  > mini-van, if you were very careful about avoiding sand pits or if the road
                                  > was damp (not wet).
                                  >
                                  > Dean
                                  >
                                • Dean Kurtz
                                  ... The community that you drive through by Highway 389 when you take the road that connects that highway to the Sand Dunes and Highway 89. Lots of
                                  Message 16 of 22 , Jan 25, 2006
                                    >What is "Cane Beds?"<

                                    The "community" that you drive through by Highway 389 when you take the road
                                    that connects that highway to the Sand Dunes and Highway 89. Lots of
                                    trailers...
                                  • luvs_to_hike
                                    Poor Bo.... I had him driving all over looking for a bed of canes ;)
                                    Message 17 of 22 , Jan 25, 2006
                                      Poor Bo....

                                      I had him driving all over looking for a bed of canes ;)

                                      --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "Dean Kurtz" <dkurtz@x...> wrote:
                                      >
                                      > >What is "Cane Beds?"<
                                      >
                                      > The "community" that you drive through by Highway 389 when you take the road
                                      > that connects that highway to the Sand Dunes and Highway 89. Lots of
                                      > trailers...
                                      >
                                    • luvs_to_hike
                                      Speaking of communities --- what s going on at the dunes? On the Utah side (I think it was) there is a road with a street sign. Its a nice gravel road and
                                      Message 18 of 22 , Jan 25, 2006
                                        Speaking of communities --- what's going on at the dunes? On the Utah side (I think it
                                        was) there is a road with a street sign. Its a nice gravel road and there are power boxes all
                                        along it. There are some trailers at the end of the road at Elephant Butte.

                                        A housing project out there? Pligs?

                                        --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "Dean Kurtz" <dkurtz@x...> wrote:
                                        >
                                        > >What is "Cane Beds?"<
                                        >
                                        > The "community" that you drive through by Highway 389 when you take the road
                                        > that connects that highway to the Sand Dunes and Highway 89. Lots of
                                        > trailers...
                                        >
                                      • Dean Kurtz
                                        No idea, but that road sign has been there for years and there is at least one residence out on that road somewhere. ... From: luvs_to_hike
                                        Message 19 of 22 , Jan 25, 2006
                                          No idea, but that road sign has been there for years and there is at least
                                          one residence out on that road somewhere.

                                          ----- Original Message -----
                                          From: "luvs_to_hike" <no_reply@yahoogroups.com>
                                          To: <Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com>
                                          Sent: Wednesday, January 25, 2006 6:34 PM
                                          Subject: [Zion_National_Park_Hiking] Re: Coral Pink Sand Dunes


                                          >
                                          > Speaking of communities --- what's going on at the dunes? On the Utah
                                          > side (I think it
                                          > was) there is a road with a street sign. Its a nice gravel road and there
                                          > are power boxes all
                                          > along it. There are some trailers at the end of the road at Elephant
                                          > Butte.
                                          >
                                          > A housing project out there? Pligs?
                                          >
                                          > --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "Dean Kurtz"
                                          > <dkurtz@x...> wrote:
                                          >>
                                          >> >What is "Cane Beds?"<
                                          >>
                                          >> The "community" that you drive through by Highway 389 when you take the
                                          >> road
                                          >> that connects that highway to the Sand Dunes and Highway 89. Lots of
                                          >> trailers...
                                          >>
                                          >
                                          >
                                          >
                                          >
                                          >
                                          >
                                          > If you would like to read posts on the net instead of taking email: Visit
                                          > us on the web
                                          > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Zion_National_Park_Hiking/
                                          >
                                          > To stop mail:
                                          > http://groups.yahoo.com/mygroups?sort=m&order=a&page=1&edit=1
                                          > Yahoo! Groups Links
                                          >
                                          >
                                          >
                                          >
                                          >
                                          >
                                        • bomabro84738
                                          ... vicinity ... and ... Bruce, I think you are reffering to Pipe Springs NM and the road we took was on 389 to the west of Pipe Springs, pretty close to
                                          Message 20 of 22 , Jan 25, 2006
                                            --- In Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com, "bsilliman2001"
                                            <weabruce@h...> wrote:
                                            >
                                            > I've been told that there is a backcountry road from in the
                                            vicinity
                                            > of Organ Pipe NM that goes north through the Coral Pink Sand Dunes
                                            and
                                            > exits onto Highway 89.
                                            >
                                            > What condition is this road in?
                                            > Is 4x4 required?
                                            > Would a mini-van be able to make it through?
                                            >
                                            > Thanks,
                                            >
                                            > bruce from bryce


                                            Bruce, I think you are reffering to Pipe Springs NM and the road we
                                            took was on 389 to the west of Pipe Springs, pretty close to Colorado
                                            City. The road is dirt for the first 8 miles then turns to asphalt
                                            for the rest of the way thru Coral Pink and until it meets up with
                                            89. The road takes you thru a small community called Cane Beds.
                                            Bo
                                          • bruce silliman
                                            Thanks Dean and yes I meant Pipe Springs.
                                            Message 21 of 22 , Jan 25, 2006
                                              Thanks Dean and yes I meant Pipe Springs.


                                              >From: "Dean Kurtz" <dkurtz@...>
                                              >Reply-To: Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com
                                              >To: <Zion_National_Park_Hiking@yahoogroups.com>
                                              >Subject: Re: [Zion_National_Park_Hiking] Coral Pink Sand Dunes
                                              >Date: Wed, 25 Jan 2006 13:25:05 -0700
                                              >
                                              > >I've been told that there is a backcountry road from in the vicinity of
                                              > >Organ Pipe NM that goes north through the Coral Pink Sand Dunes and exits
                                              > >onto Highway 89.<
                                              >
                                              >Organ Pipe? I think you have your national monuments confused. Is it
                                              >possible that you mean Pipe Springs? If so, here it is: One road from
                                              >Pipe
                                              >Springs to the Sand Dunes, then through them, gets you to the county road
                                              >that connects to Highway 89. Not possible in anything but a 4x4 or
                                              >(better)
                                              >ATV, also not legal. This road crosses Kaibab Paiute land and is gated and
                                              >locked, and they are VERY particular about who gets through. Second road
                                              >actually connects Cane Beds on Highway 389 in Arizona ('bout 4 miles south
                                              >of that famous hamlet of Colorado City) to Highway 89 via the county road
                                              >through Coral Pink Sand Dunes. This road is paved from Highway 89 to the
                                              >Arizona border, and from Highway 389 to some point north, though I'm not
                                              >sure where as this improvement was made within the last 2 months and I have
                                              >not been through since. The way the road was it could be done with a
                                              >mini-van, if you were very careful about avoiding sand pits or if the road
                                              >was damp (not wet).
                                              >
                                              >Dean
                                              >
                                            • ~*~News Today~*~
                                              Coral Pink Sand Dunes By: D. Gary Webb With the Beach Boys rocking in the background – mostly for the use of the older boarders – kids in baggy shorts and
                                              Message 22 of 22 , Jul 1, 2006
                                                Coral Pink Sand Dunes
                                                By: D. Gary Webb With the Beach Boys rocking in the background – mostly for the use of the older boarders – kids in baggy shorts and all manner of ocean gear took their turns at hitting the perfect wave.
                                                In this case, the perfect wave was a 40-foot wall of sand, whittled away from the surrounding sandstone cliffs by millions of years of snow, rain, and in this case, boy scouts.
                                                For Troop 346, right up there with Ali as “The Greatest,” only in different circles, made the Coral Pink Sand Dunes a yearly – at least – trip.
                                                The Dunes are within a couple of hours of everywhere, but for the uninitiated, take the road marked Lake Powell out of Kanab, but don’t go as far as the Paria River. It’s 30 or so miles from Kanab, and another dozen on a good dirt road.
                                                Hey, we’re talking sand dunes; don’t get hyper if you get a bit dirty. There will be sand in your shoes, socks and hair; but hopefully none in your eggs.
                                                While the area is now full of 4x4’s and moto’s, there is still enough of the old area to remind an old scout of the old days, and old surf boards.
                                                For a month beforehand we would carefully craft our boards, which generally resembled regular surfboards. Some guys made the edges round, trying to gain an edge with less resistance.
                                                The object of the event, of course, was to beat your opponent. No clock; the winner simply went on until he got beat, and after a full day of sliding down the hill only to have to walk back up, I realized the prize wasn’t worth the climb. Besides, I always had a good stash of scout-worthy goodies.
                                                We had long boards, short boards, wide boards and skinny ones. It didn’t take me long to discover that long and medium were the answer – depending on one’s weight, of course – and that the kind of linoleum and wax didn’t matter.
                                                Some times a board would go faster depending on who rode it. Must be something to do with weight, right? So, we weighted them, lightened them, curved and straightened them. Again, it depended on the rider more than the board.
                                                We had no iPods, no tunes of any kind, so abbreviated versions of the Beach Boys were always in style. Crashes were not only predictable, when a kid goes fast downhill and eventually stops rather suddenly, but some scouts made an art of flips, crashes and the like.
                                                About the only thing we could really count on was that “Dirt Mouth” would always have a dirt ring around his nose and mouth, that it was farther up the hill than back down, and that the scout leaders would have great meals all lined up.
                                                Life, like all things, has changed the Dunes. There is a price if you go all the way into the bathrooms and camping areas, which are nearer the biggest bowl area, and it doesn’t have all the great camping spots anymore.
                                                Where only side-winders and bird tracks dotted the area along with the occasional cat, there are few snake trails and even fewer birds now.
                                                The sand, forever red and forever in my adidas and carpet, will be there long after I’m gone, though.
                                                 

                                                __________________________________________________
                                                Do You Yahoo!?
                                                Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
                                                http://mail.yahoo.com

                                              Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.