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Re: [Yuricon] Re: Drama CDs

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  • Johann Chua
    ... I ve noticed that North American VAs who do anime (David Kaye, Venus Terzo, Kari Wahlgren, Yuri Lowenthal) sound better in North American cartoons (like
    Message 1 of 16 , Dec 8, 2008
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      On Mon, Dec 8, 2008 at 11:57 PM, atheniag <anilesbocon01@...> wrote:
      > I cringe at the thought of curent dub actors voicing Marimite DCDs.
      > Yes, I am a voice purist, but simply because Japanese seiyuu have
      > trained differently and record differently than English-language
      > voice-over actors. Should the dubbing industry ever become so thriving
      > here that there are schools that train actors' voices to the level
      > they do in Japan, and should they begin recording all together in one
      > room, so they can actually act off one another, I don't have any
      > objection.

      I've noticed that North American VAs who do anime (David Kaye, Venus
      Terzo, Kari Wahlgren, Yuri Lowenthal) sound better in North American
      cartoons (like Beast Wars and Legion of Super Heroes) where they do
      record as a group, albeit without the complication of overdubbing. And
      tend to have better scripts and voice directors. ISTR Ian Cortlett
      mentioning that ovedubbing anime is twice as much work as
      pre-recording voices, for the same amount of pay. Of course in Japan
      afureco _is_ the industry.

      The rationale I've heard for one-by-one dubbing is for better lip
      sync, which is why Disney animated movies also use individual
      recording, despite being done before the animation. Jan Scott-Frazier
      (nee Scott Frazier)* has a bit of a pet peeve with the American
      animation industry's obsession with perfect lip sync.

      Supposedly the reason for group recording in Japan is due to the high
      cost of studio time in Tokyo, though I have no independent
      confirmation for this.

      *(I find it interesting that as Scott Frazier, Jan was promoting the
      Animo digital animation software suite in Japan. Animo was used in
      SImoun.)
    • iatheia
      ... DCDs. ... thriving ... one ... And ... Frazier ... high ... Ah, yet another weird reason. How can you lip sync something that was translated? Well, you can
      Message 2 of 16 , Dec 8, 2008
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        --- In Yuricon@yahoogroups.com, "Johann Chua" <johannconradchua@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > On Mon, Dec 8, 2008 at 11:57 PM, atheniag <anilesbocon01@...> wrote:
        > > I cringe at the thought of curent dub actors voicing Marimite
        DCDs.
        > > Yes, I am a voice purist, but simply because Japanese seiyuu have
        > > trained differently and record differently than English-language
        > > voice-over actors. Should the dubbing industry ever become so
        thriving
        > > here that there are schools that train actors' voices to the level
        > > they do in Japan, and should they begin recording all together in
        one
        > > room, so they can actually act off one another, I don't have any
        > > objection.
        >
        > I've noticed that North American VAs who do anime (David Kaye, Venus
        > Terzo, Kari Wahlgren, Yuri Lowenthal) sound better in North American
        > cartoons (like Beast Wars and Legion of Super Heroes) where they do
        > record as a group, albeit without the complication of overdubbing.
        And
        > tend to have better scripts and voice directors. ISTR Ian Cortlett
        > mentioning that ovedubbing anime is twice as much work as
        > pre-recording voices, for the same amount of pay. Of course in Japan
        > afureco _is_ the industry.
        >
        > The rationale I've heard for one-by-one dubbing is for better lip
        > sync, which is why Disney animated movies also use individual
        > recording, despite being done before the animation. Jan Scott-
        Frazier
        > (nee Scott Frazier)* has a bit of a pet peeve with the American
        > animation industry's obsession with perfect lip sync.
        >
        > Supposedly the reason for group recording in Japan is due to the
        high
        > cost of studio time in Tokyo, though I have no independent
        > confirmation for this.
        >
        > *(I find it interesting that as Scott Frazier, Jan was promoting the
        > Animo digital animation software suite in Japan. Animo was used in
        > SImoun.)

        Ah, yet another weird reason. How can you lip sync something that was
        translated? Well, you can try, but I sincerelly do doubt the
        effectiveness of it...
      • Johann Chua
        ... Way back when we first got Tagalog-dubbed telenovelas, they suffered from the La Traidora Effect of really bad lip sync. Voice actors here mostly do
        Message 3 of 16 , Dec 8, 2008
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          On Tue, Dec 9, 2008 at 7:19 AM, iatheia <iatheia@...> wrote:
          > --- In Yuricon@yahoogroups.com, "Johann Chua" <johannconradchua@...>
          > wrote:
          >
          >> The rationale I've heard for one-by-one dubbing is for better lip
          >> sync, which is why Disney animated movies also use individual
          >> recording, despite being done before the animation. Jan Scott-
          > Frazier
          >> (nee Scott Frazier)* has a bit of a pet peeve with the American
          >> animation industry's obsession with perfect lip sync.
          >
          > Ah, yet another weird reason. How can you lip sync something that was
          > translated? Well, you can try, but I sincerelly do doubt the
          > effectiveness of it...

          Way back when we first got Tagalog-dubbed telenovelas, they suffered
          from the "La Traidora Effect" of really bad lip sync. Voice actors
          here mostly do radio dramas and anime, which is much easier to dub
          over than live-action of American animation. Live-action dubbing has
          gotten better, though it's mostly Korean and Chinese dramas these
          days.

          Anime _never_ has perfect lip sync, even in Japanese, since they don't
          really try. Syncing the animation to pre-recorded voices is the only
          way to get it, but that costs ridiculous amounts of money for marginal
          benefit.
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