Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Slightly OT: return from Hong Kong

Expand Messages
  • crimsonlotus20
    Greetings all, I returned from a rather pleasant 5-day trip to Hong Kong yesterday, where I decided to take the opportunity to probe into the magna/anime
    Message 1 of 3 , Jun 11, 2008
    • 0 Attachment
      Greetings all,

      I returned from a rather pleasant 5-day trip to Hong Kong yesterday,
      where I decided to take the opportunity to probe into the
      magna/anime subculture of the island-city. As with most of the
      developed Pacific Rim, youth culture is heavily Nipponised in theme,
      content and aesthetic - a phenomenon I detected last year in
      Shanghai, too. In this sense, I was reasonably optimistic that a
      distinctive yuri-themed niche of 'manhwa' (Sinicisation of the
      term 'manga') could be found. On the basis of recommendations, I
      went to a number of reading rooms (where much like in Japan one pays
      an hourly fee to access a large library) and bookshops and
      ascertained the wide availability of titles both in Japanese and
      translated into Chinese.

      Now, you must bear with me since, if my Japanese is fifth-rate, my
      Cantonese verges on the nonexistent. Requests for yaoi were greeted
      with much enthusiasm and reasonably explicit yaoi titles were on
      sale (rigorously behind plastic) in underground train station
      kiosks. BL has a massive following and I even found yaoi-themed
      computer games on sale in all-purpose hobby stores. Requests for
      yuri/shoujo-ai, however, drew generally blank stares - though I was
      offered an impressive and, sometimes, home-grown selection of BL
      comics to compensate. I regret to inform that the market is
      minuscule and/or too obscure for me to identify. In reality, part of
      the problem is that there is less variety in manga/anime aimed at
      males (who in Japan, I understand, are crucial in rounding out the
      Yuri market, when not outright dominating it in many titles) -
      domestically-produced manhwa dealing with martial
      arts/historical/sci-fi epics are strong competitors with Japanese
      imports in material aimed at males, something which has doubtless
      choked the yuri market. From what I could gather - the 'skinship'
      that is often mistaken for yuri in Japanese material is prevalent in
      many Hong Kong offerings, especially those of a tawdry high-school
      drama nature - but Yuri in the sense of Marimite or Kashimashi is a
      notable absentee.

      On a relatively bright note, I was able to purchase a copy of the
      rather good 2004 film "Butterfly" (åš'±) which is perhaps one of the
      more frank and sensitive Far Eastern attempts at dealing with
      lesbian sentiments and romance. Oddly enough, though, Hong Kong
      struck me as straitlaced in a very Confucian sort of way. A re-run
      of Pulp Fiction on the hotel satellite channel had all instances of
      the word 'fuck' muted out and local English-language media was
      debating the virtues of allowing the film 'Sex and the City' to
      obtain wide cinematic distribution - in the end, it received the
      equivalent of an NC-18 certificate and a HK$5 surcharge on all
      admissions. Not quite Singapore...but not a million miles away
      either.

      Very well, enough incoherent rambling. Just thought I'd share a few
      impressions of what has effectively become an ancillary arm of
      Japanese pop culture.

      Best regards,
      MdG
    • blu_gloo
      ... greeted ... was ... of ... in ... a ... I live in Hong Kong and I totally agree that yuri manga/anime/novels are pretty much non-existent. When I put yuri
      Message 2 of 3 , Jun 13, 2008
      • 0 Attachment
        --- In Yuricon@yahoogroups.com, "crimsonlotus20" <crimsonlotus@...>
        wrote:

        > Now, you must bear with me since, if my Japanese is fifth-rate, my
        > Cantonese verges on the nonexistent. Requests for yaoi were
        greeted
        > with much enthusiasm and reasonably explicit yaoi titles were on
        > sale (rigorously behind plastic) in underground train station
        > kiosks. BL has a massive following and I even found yaoi-themed
        > computer games on sale in all-purpose hobby stores. Requests for
        > yuri/shoujo-ai, however, drew generally blank stares - though I
        was
        > offered an impressive and, sometimes, home-grown selection of BL
        > comics to compensate. I regret to inform that the market is
        > minuscule and/or too obscure for me to identify. In reality, part
        of
        > the problem is that there is less variety in manga/anime aimed at
        > males (who in Japan, I understand, are crucial in rounding out the
        > Yuri market, when not outright dominating it in many titles) -
        > domestically-produced manhwa dealing with martial
        > arts/historical/sci-fi epics are strong competitors with Japanese
        > imports in material aimed at males, something which has doubtless
        > choked the yuri market. From what I could gather - the 'skinship'
        > that is often mistaken for yuri in Japanese material is prevalent
        in
        > many Hong Kong offerings, especially those of a tawdry high-school
        > drama nature - but Yuri in the sense of Marimite or Kashimashi is
        a
        > notable absentee.

        I live in Hong Kong and I totally agree that yuri manga/anime/novels
        are pretty much non-existent. When I put 'yuri manga' (in Chinese)
        into google search, the results I come back in are mostly in
        simplified Chinese. Hong Kong and Taiwan use traditional Chinese,
        whereas other parts of China use simplified Chinese. So that implies
        that most people who write about yuri on the web aren't from Hong
        Kong.

        I wasn't sure if you meant that there are hardly any Japanese yuri
        manga titles traslated into Chinese, or there are hardly any yuri
        manga titles written by Chinese people. I'm a lazy person so I've
        never actually tried to look for yuri manga translated into Chinese,
        so I've never seen any.

        But it seems that Marimite novels and manga are licensed in Chinese
        by some Taiwan company, so I could find it somewhere in Hong Kong,
        if I wasn't so lazy. Otherwise, the only time I've seen Marimite was
        on Animax, and that was only one episode to fill up one of the
        unfavourable timeslots.

        GI
      • crimsonlotus20
        Frankly, I was looking for yuri-themed manhwa produced by Chinese authors, whether in Classical or Simplified format. I went up and down Nathan Road and took a
        Message 3 of 3 , Jun 13, 2008
        • 0 Attachment
          Frankly, I was looking for yuri-themed manhwa produced by Chinese
          authors, whether in Classical or Simplified format. I went up and down
          Nathan Road and took a very immersive night-walk through Mongkok to
          have a look at the various offerings, but you're right, nothing like
          the sort of variety on offer in Japan. Oh well, perhaps domestic
          producers have yet to reach commercial/thematic maturity. We shall
          see, but I eagerly await the arrival of a more diversified yuri
          market. I think that the nipponisation of popular culture in East Asia
          could very well contribute to that.

          Regards,
          MdG

          --- In Yuricon@yahoogroups.com, "blu_gloo" <blu_gloo@...> wrote:
          >
          > --- In Yuricon@yahoogroups.com, "crimsonlotus20" <crimsonlotus@>
          > wrote:
          >
          > > Now, you must bear with me since, if my Japanese is fifth-rate, my
          > > Cantonese verges on the nonexistent. Requests for yaoi were
          > greeted
          > > with much enthusiasm and reasonably explicit yaoi titles were on
          > > sale (rigorously behind plastic) in underground train station
          > > kiosks. BL has a massive following and I even found yaoi-themed
          > > computer games on sale in all-purpose hobby stores. Requests for
          > > yuri/shoujo-ai, however, drew generally blank stares - though I
          > was
          > > offered an impressive and, sometimes, home-grown selection of BL
          > > comics to compensate. I regret to inform that the market is
          > > minuscule and/or too obscure for me to identify. In reality, part
          > of
          > > the problem is that there is less variety in manga/anime aimed at
          > > males (who in Japan, I understand, are crucial in rounding out the
          > > Yuri market, when not outright dominating it in many titles) -
          > > domestically-produced manhwa dealing with martial
          > > arts/historical/sci-fi epics are strong competitors with Japanese
          > > imports in material aimed at males, something which has doubtless
          > > choked the yuri market. From what I could gather - the 'skinship'
          > > that is often mistaken for yuri in Japanese material is prevalent
          > in
          > > many Hong Kong offerings, especially those of a tawdry high-school
          > > drama nature - but Yuri in the sense of Marimite or Kashimashi is
          > a
          > > notable absentee.
          >
          > I live in Hong Kong and I totally agree that yuri manga/anime/novels
          > are pretty much non-existent. When I put 'yuri manga' (in Chinese)
          > into google search, the results I come back in are mostly in
          > simplified Chinese. Hong Kong and Taiwan use traditional Chinese,
          > whereas other parts of China use simplified Chinese. So that implies
          > that most people who write about yuri on the web aren't from Hong
          > Kong.
          >
          > I wasn't sure if you meant that there are hardly any Japanese yuri
          > manga titles traslated into Chinese, or there are hardly any yuri
          > manga titles written by Chinese people. I'm a lazy person so I've
          > never actually tried to look for yuri manga translated into Chinese,
          > so I've never seen any.
          >
          > But it seems that Marimite novels and manga are licensed in Chinese
          > by some Taiwan company, so I could find it somewhere in Hong Kong,
          > if I wasn't so lazy. Otherwise, the only time I've seen Marimite was
          > on Animax, and that was only one episode to fill up one of the
          > unfavourable timeslots.
          >
          > GI
          >
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.