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OT: Lesbian Lit in Saudi Arabia?

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  • Rikaishi
    Found an interesting tidbit from this article on a particular controversial book which has helped spark a rush of publications by female writers in Saudi
    Message 1 of 3 , Feb 9, 2008
      Found an interesting tidbit from this article on a particular controversial book which has helped spark a rush of publications by female writers in Saudi Arabia, which has until recently been a very strict Muslim society.
      One of those women used the pen name Siba al-Harz to write The Others, an account of "enforced" lesbianism resulting from the strict segregation of the sexes and guilt among young women in Saudi society. Considered more literary than Girls of Riyadh, it employs a sophisticated use of classical Arabic, and its publisher--the same one that published Alsanea's book--calls it one of the best books by young Saudi women writers today.

      I'd be interested to hear if anyone knows of an English translation or synopsis of this book, be it official or unofficial.

      Full article can be found here: http://www.forbes.com/2008/01/09/saudi-arabia-fiction-forbeslife-globalpop08-cx_me_0109eltahawy.html?feed=rss_news
    • Ellen Kuhfeld
      I wonder how long it ll be before the local committee for the suppression of vice kills her? Ellen Rose ... From: Yuricon@yahoogroups.com
      Message 2 of 3 , Feb 9, 2008
        Message
        I wonder how long it'll be before the local committee for the suppression of vice kills her?
         
        Ellen Rose
         
        -----Original Message-----
        From: Yuricon@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Yuricon@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Rikaishi
        Sent: Saturday, February 09, 2008 4:44 PM
        To: yuricon@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [Yuricon] OT: Lesbian Lit in Saudi Arabia?

        Found an interesting tidbit from this article on a particular controversial book which has helped spark a rush of publications by female writers in Saudi Arabia, which has until recently been a very strict Muslim society.

        One of those women used the pen name Siba al-Harz to write The Others, an account of "enforced" lesbianism resulting from the strict segregation of the sexes and guilt among young women in Saudi society. Considered more literary than Girls of Riyadh, it employs a sophisticated use of classical Arabic, and its publisher--the same one that published Alsanea's book--calls it one of the best books by young Saudi women writers today.

        I'd be interested to hear if anyone knows of an English translation or synopsis of this book, be it official or unofficial.

        Full article can be found here: http://www.forbes. com/2008/ 01/09/saudi- arabia-fiction- forbeslife- globalpop08- cx_me_0109eltaha wy.html?feed= rss_news

      • crimsonlotus20
        Actually, the SA religious secret police is far more interested in male sodomy (something Freudian there, no doubt), since it is an affront to Arabic
        Message 3 of 3 , Feb 9, 2008
          Actually, the SA religious secret police is far more interested in
          male sodomy (something Freudian there, no doubt), since it is an
          affront to Arabic constructs of masculinity (ie. a man is being
          penetrated, therefore questioning manliness as a whole). Conversely,
          low-profile relations between women are not high on the priority list
          of 'vices' to be suppressed, though I would imagine that we would have
          to keen an exceedingly low profile. Actually, I recall reading about a
          ruling by which male homosexuality, or acts associated with it,
          carried capital penalties, but acts deemed 'against nature' between
          women tended to be punished with 'mere' flogging.

          The notion of 'enforced' lesbianism is, however, a recurring motif in
          both the Islamic world and the West's perception of it. Montesquieu in
          his Persian Letters alludes to lesbianism or bisexuality in the harem
          and a Mediaeval Arab ruling stated that the alleged impregnation of a
          serving girl, via the girl's mistress who, after having sex with her
          husband, went on to sleep with her servant, would have to be treated
          as if the master of the house had directly impregnated the serving
          girl himself, thereby compelling the man to pay for the child's
          upkeep. This episode could well be anecdotal, but I do recall reading
          about it from a fairly reputable source.

          Regards,
          MdG

          --- In Yuricon@yahoogroups.com, "Ellen Kuhfeld" <ellen@...> wrote:
          >
          > I wonder how long it'll be before the local committee for the
          > suppression of vice kills her?
          >
          > Ellen Rose
          >
          >
          > -----Original Message-----
          > From: Yuricon@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Yuricon@yahoogroups.com] On
          > Behalf Of Rikaishi
          > Sent: Saturday, February 09, 2008 4:44 PM
          > To: yuricon@yahoogroups.com
          > Subject: [Yuricon] OT: Lesbian Lit in Saudi Arabia?
          >
          >
          >
          > Found an interesting tidbit from this article on a particular
          > controversial book which has helped spark a rush of publications by
          > female writers in Saudi Arabia, which has until recently been a very
          > strict Muslim society.
          >
          >
          >
          > One of those women used the pen name Siba al-Harz to write The Others,
          > an account of "enforced" lesbianism resulting from the strict
          > segregation of the sexes and guilt among young women in Saudi society.
          > Considered more literary than Girls of Riyadh, it employs a
          > sophisticated use of classical Arabic, and its publisher--the same one
          > that published Alsanea's book--calls it one of the best books by young
          > Saudi women writers today.
          >
          >
          >
          > I'd be interested to hear if anyone knows of an English translation or
          > synopsis of this book, be it official or unofficial.
          >
          > Full article can be found here: http://www.forbes
          > <http://www.forbes.com/2008/01/09/saudi-arabia-fiction-forbeslife-glob
          > alpop08-cx_me_0109eltahawy.html?feed=rss_news>
          > com/2008/01/09/saudi-arabia-fiction-forbeslife-globalpop08-cx_me_0109e
          > ltahawy.html?feed=rss_news
          >
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