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15367Re: Jubei-Chan 2 or Absent Mothers

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  • Andy00@aol.com
    Jun 10, 2004
      Well....I think Jubei-chan handled the "dead mother" thing a LITTLE better than most, (or at least it's more complex) 
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      Jiyu and Sai have their OWN issues they have to work through.   Sai is constantly running away from/trying to overcompensate for his feelings of guilt over his wife's death.

      The thing to understand is that Sai KNEW how to break the Mystic Fever (my term) that killed Jiyu's mother.   (Icing down one's body and holding the other.  He does this for Jiyu in the first season, and Ayunosuke does it for Jiyu to keep her from collapsing in the second to last ep in second season.  Freasha can "suck away" the Mystic Fever at will.)

      But he was so busy with work, he succumbed to the temptation of merely assuming that Jiyu thought it was more serious than it was.    So he returns late that night to a young Jiyu not looking at him, and telling him that "Mama's dead."

      This death has been hanging over them for a LOONG time.  Both of them overcompensate to try and create a happy family, to the point of NOT really communicating with each other, but _at_ each other.  (It's no coincidence that their supernatural troubles involve the inability of the dead to either adapt to the present or to move on, and Jiyu and Sai not talking about her being Jubei-chan.)

      This has resulted in Jiyu's identity being "unbalanced."  Most magical girl series have a mundane goal surrounded by the supernatural, and Jiyu's is

      A friend of mine tells me that all magical girl series are a twisted metaphor for puberty.  Well, Jubei-chan is even more of that than most.   Second season hits that imagery over our heads with most of Jiyu's classmates constantly talking about growing up and deciding what to do with their lives.  The director practically shouts it in episode 11 of Second Season where Sai tells the Disassociated Jiyu that she has to choose her own path, and that he'll support her whatever she does (or whoever she becomes)

      ....and then there's the Freudian approach to this series, which is something else.  Obsessions with parents (both subliminal and direct) and it's affect on gender identity (the eyepatches and swords are rather interesting yonical and phallic symbols)
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