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Re: Prep for resin

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  • Ross Leavens
    For more detailed plastic pieces, resin or syrene, I ve use an air- eraser with super-fine abrasive, either hand-held or small booth on my bench, to clean
    Message 1 of 10 , Feb 8, 2008
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      For more detailed plastic pieces, resin or syrene, I've use an "air-
      eraser" with super-fine abrasive, either hand-held or small booth on my
      bench, to clean and "sand-blast" the surface in the nooks and crannies
      (careful, easy to get heavy-handed!). It also seems to allow me to get
      away with a thin misted coat of primer with airbrush, avoiding too much
      build up, which can obscure detail when that's a concern.

      Ross
    • Les
      I use a primer too, I use a a Testors Light Gray Paint called Camo Gray, its a very fine grained paint, I put the first coat on lightly then second light coat.
      Message 2 of 10 , Feb 9, 2008
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        I use a primer too, I use a a Testors Light Gray Paint called Camo
        Gray, its a very fine grained paint, I put the first coat on lightly
        then second light coat. I don't like automotive primer because of the
        size of grain it gives, I do use it for larger scale professional
        models. I also use a light color because of what it does to over
        colors such as yellows and reds. The light gray I can wash or use
        floquil paints over.

        Les

        --- In Yorke_Kits@yahoogroups.com, "hvig" <harry.vig@...> wrote:
        >
        > Since there's a high calibre of modeller on this list, I'd like to
        > pick some of your brains.
        >
        > I love the way I can put thinned acrylic paints on either wood or
        > hydrocal and the medium absorbs much of the excess water.
        >
        > Plastic resin kits however will ball up acrylic paint, even when the
        > paint is much thicker.
        >
        > Do any of you have a recommendation on how to prepare the surface for
        > urethane or polyester resin to get the acrylic paint to hold better?
        > (other than scrubbing).
        >
      • Gumtown & Kauri Pass
        Hey all, I find this thread fascinating. I have been painting resin kits for at least 15 years now using nothing but acrylics and have never found the need
        Message 3 of 10 , Feb 9, 2008
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          Hey all,

          I find this thread fascinating. I have been painting resin kits for at
          least 15 years now using nothing but acrylics and have never found the need
          for anything more than a wash in warm soapy water (dishwashing liquid)
          before painting.

          I use Tamiya acrylic paints and an airbrush. I have never used a primer and
          never had problems with with adherence. I wonder if the paint brands are
          making a difference? I've not used any of the "railroad" paints because, at
          least here in New Zealand, they are way overpriced and I've always been very
          happy with the Tamiya paints.

          Lincoln McCann
          Chief Engineer
          Gumtown & Kauri Pass Tramway Co.

          http://homepages.ihug.co.nz/~mccannclan/gkp.html
        • Tom Yorke
          ... Lincoln, Tamiya paints are made for acrylics unlike the cheap brands such as Apple Barrel. If you can get them they are great for the money. Airbrushing
          Message 4 of 10 , Feb 9, 2008
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            --- In Yorke_Kits@yahoogroups.com, "Gumtown & Kauri Pass" <gkp@...> wrote:
            >
            > Hey all,
            >
            > I find this thread fascinating. I have been painting resin kits for at
            > least 15 years now using nothing but acrylics and have never found the need
            > for anything more than a wash in warm soapy water (dishwashing liquid)
            > before painting.
            >
            > I use Tamiya acrylic paints and an airbrush. I have never used a primer and
            > never had problems with with adherence. I wonder if the paint brands are
            > making a difference? I've not used any of the "railroad" paints because, at
            > least here in New Zealand, they are way overpriced and I've always been very
            > happy with the Tamiya paints.
            >
            > Lincoln McCann
            > Chief Engineer
            > Gumtown & Kauri Pass Tramway Co.


            Lincoln,
            Tamiya paints are made for acrylics unlike the cheap brands such as Apple Barrel. If you
            can get them they are great for the money. Airbrushing also helps a lot! Brush painting is
            where you can have some trouble and an undercoat is desirable. Brush painting takes
            some practice, but then again so does airbrush.

            Tom
          • Gumtown & Kauri Pass
            ... Tom & all, I do use brushes as there are some effects that you can t achieve with an airbrush. Usually I use brushes after the model has been covered with
            Message 5 of 10 , Feb 9, 2008
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              > Lincoln,
              > Tamiya paints are made for acrylics unlike the cheap brands such as Apple
              > Barrel. If you
              > can get them they are great for the money. Airbrushing also helps a lot!
              > Brush painting is
              > where you can have some trouble and an undercoat is desirable. Brush
              > painting takes
              > some practice, but then again so does airbrush.
              >
              > Tom


              Tom & all,

              I do use brushes as there are some effects that you can't achieve with an
              airbrush. Usually I use brushes after the model has been covered with it's
              base colour, often the brushes are used for final accenting, picking out
              details, dry brushing etc. I would never use a brush to cover the model in
              paint, the airbrush allows good coverage without obscuring detail. Each
              tool for a purpose.

              You are right about the Tamiya paints. The quality is good and they are
              made for modeling. I have used, and do use more generic artists type paints
              for some work, figure painting for example but tend to stick to the Tamiya
              for rolling stock and motive power etc. Each medium for a purpose.

              Regards

              Lincoln McCann
              Chief Engineer
              Gumtown & Kauri Pass Tramway Co.

              http://homepages.ihug.co.nz/~mccannclan/gkp.html
            • Tom Yorke
              ... Couldn t agree with you more Lincoln! Tom
              Message 6 of 10 , Feb 10, 2008
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                --- In Yorke_Kits@yahoogroups.com, "Gumtown & Kauri Pass" <gkp@...> wrote:
                >
                >
                > > Lincoln,
                > > Tamiya paints are made for acrylics unlike the cheap brands such as Apple
                > > Barrel. If you
                > > can get them they are great for the money. Airbrushing also helps a lot!
                > > Brush painting is
                > > where you can have some trouble and an undercoat is desirable. Brush
                > > painting takes
                > > some practice, but then again so does airbrush.
                > >
                > > Tom
                >
                >
                > Tom & all,
                >
                > I do use brushes as there are some effects that you can't achieve with an
                > airbrush. Usually I use brushes after the model has been covered with it's
                > base colour, often the brushes are used for final accenting, picking out
                > details, dry brushing etc. I would never use a brush to cover the model in
                > paint, the airbrush allows good coverage without obscuring detail. Each
                > tool for a purpose.
                >
                > You are right about the Tamiya paints. The quality is good and they are
                > made for modeling. I have used, and do use more generic artists type paints
                > for some work, figure painting for example but tend to stick to the Tamiya
                > for rolling stock and motive power etc. Each medium for a purpose.
                >
                > Regards
                >
                > Lincoln McCann
                > Chief Engineer
                > Gumtown & Kauri Pass Tramway Co.


                Couldn't agree with you more Lincoln!

                Tom
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