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Where have all the narrow gaugers gone.....................

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  • Tom Yorke
    ..................................... long time passing............................................................................ It used to be that the
    Message 1 of 18 , Dec 5, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      ..................................... long time
      passing............................................................................
      It used to be that the narrow gaugers were the cream of the crop. The most resourceful,
      most well read, best model builders and always the most creative and cutting edge. What
      happened when I blinked? They seem to be gone, save for a small handful of faithful still
      carrying the torch. Has it at last run its course? Most people don't have the patients to
      build anything. They want it done for them, but in many cases they don't want to pay for
      it. We have been innundated with (quality) items from China that no American company
      can compete with (even though I probably make an equal 25 cents an hour!).

      I remember years ago trolley modellers would spend money on their cars, but use "cerial"
      boxes with holes cut in them for structures! Beautiful trollies, but dreadful structures and
      dime store "scaleless" autos of wierd design and worse manufacture. Then it all changed.
      Things improved. Some really nice layouts started popping up. Now, in contemporary
      times, it seems we have reverted to those glorious years of the past. Wa' hapenn? Did
      everyone just lose interest?

      In days of old, we all knew where to get those pesky little detail parts because we all
      invested in manufacturer's catalogs like Precision, Kemtron, Grandt Line and so on. Now
      every day someone asks where to get something when its right there in the catalog. A
      couple bucks investment and you have the info at your finger tips. Most are even on the
      web now. Another question I love is "does anybody have any information on the WP&Y?
      Ever heard of Google and the internet? Why waste time waiting for 35 different people to
      answer the same thing over several days time when its right there in your computer?
      Questions are fine. That's how we learn, but common now, do a little work yourself. You
      might actually find it fun. Naaa! Guess not. Another thing. Buy some ties. Buy some spikes.
      They don't cost that much. Spend your time building a car from scratch. Why reinvent the
      wheel? I suppose it is possible to make your own glue too if you've a mind to. Me? I'd
      rather spend my limited time being more creative. I can buy glue anywhere.

      If we didn't have a part way back in the Stone Age, we'd make our own. It was much
      quicker than ordering from a catalog. If I'm building something, the last thing I want to do
      is to wait two weeks for a widget that I can make in ten minutes and be done with it. Now,
      if I had that widget from some company, I'd use it - but I'm not going to wait for it unless I
      can't make it.

      All of this really conserns me. I see the hobby really changing and in many ways, not for
      the good. I think the average age for a model railroader in somewhere in the mid 60's
      now. No matter what anybody says in any editorial in any model magazine, model
      railroading IS dying. Creativity from the hand is a thing of the past and that is too bad. The
      current world situation isn't helping any of this much. Some of us like what's going on and
      others don't. Just for the record, I am a don't, but that's enough politics here. It effects our
      minds and attitudes many times in a negative way. I try to use my modelling as an escape
      from reality. I can get lost in a project for hours. I love doing things by hand. And no, I
      wasn't born like that. I had to learn how to do all this stuff. You should see my earliest
      work. No you shouldn't come to think of it!

      Come on people. Let's get going. There isn't much you can do about the world situation,
      but you sure can get lost in your trains. That way you won't even know when the world
      blows up. You'll just be having fun, then..........poof


      Something to think about if you've a mind to.........
      Tom
    • dwain wright
      VERY WELL SAID, TOM. often wonder whats next-being a greeter at the border or wallmart. dwain wright- http://wrightmodelworks.tripod.com/ Tom Yorke
      Message 2 of 18 , Dec 5, 2006
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        VERY WELL SAID, TOM.
        often wonder whats next-being a greeter at the border or wallmart.
        dwain wright-
        http://wrightmodelworks.tripod.com/

        Tom Yorke <tomyorke@...> wrote: ..................................... long time
        passing............................................................................
        It used to be that the narrow gaugers were the cream of the crop. The most resourceful,
        most well read, best model builders and always the most creative and cutting edge. What
        happened when I blinked? They seem to be gone, save for a small handful of faithful still
        carrying the torch. Has it at last run its course? Most people don't have the patients to
        build anything. They want it done for them, but in many cases they don't want to pay for
        it. We have been innundated with (quality) items from China that no American company
        can compete with (even though I probably make an equal 25 cents an hour!).

        I remember years ago trolley modellers would spend money on their cars, but use "cerial"
        boxes with holes cut in them for structures! Beautiful trollies, but dreadful structures and
        dime store "scaleless" autos of wierd design and worse manufacture. Then it all changed.
        Things improved. Some really nice layouts started popping up. Now, in contemporary
        times, it seems we have reverted to those glorious years of the past. Wa' hapenn? Did
        everyone just lose interest?

        In days of old, we all knew where to get those pesky little detail parts because we all
        invested in manufacturer's catalogs like Precision, Kemtron, Grandt Line and so on. Now
        every day someone asks where to get something when its right there in the catalog. A
        couple bucks investment and you have the info at your finger tips. Most are even on the
        web now. Another question I love is "does anybody have any information on the WP&Y?
        Ever heard of Google and the internet? Why waste time waiting for 35 different people to
        answer the same thing over several days time when its right there in your computer?
        Questions are fine. That's how we learn, but common now, do a little work yourself. You
        might actually find it fun. Naaa! Guess not. Another thing. Buy some ties. Buy some spikes.
        They don't cost that much. Spend your time building a car from scratch. Why reinvent the
        wheel? I suppose it is possible to make your own glue too if you've a mind to. Me? I'd
        rather spend my limited time being more creative. I can buy glue anywhere.

        If we didn't have a part way back in the Stone Age, we'd make our own. It was much
        quicker than ordering from a catalog. If I'm building something, the last thing I want to do
        is to wait two weeks for a widget that I can make in ten minutes and be done with it. Now,
        if I had that widget from some company, I'd use it - but I'm not going to wait for it unless I
        can't make it.

        All of this really conserns me. I see the hobby really changing and in many ways, not for
        the good. I think the average age for a model railroader in somewhere in the mid 60's
        now. No matter what anybody says in any editorial in any model magazine, model
        railroading IS dying. Creativity from the hand is a thing of the past and that is too bad. The
        current world situation isn't helping any of this much. Some of us like what's going on and
        others don't. Just for the record, I am a don't, but that's enough politics here. It effects our
        minds and attitudes many times in a negative way. I try to use my modelling as an escape
        from reality. I can get lost in a project for hours. I love doing things by hand. And no, I
        wasn't born like that. I had to learn how to do all this stuff. You should see my earliest
        work. No you shouldn't come to think of it!

        Come on people. Let's get going. There isn't much you can do about the world situation,
        but you sure can get lost in your trains. That way you won't even know when the world
        blows up. You'll just be having fun, then..........poof

        Something to think about if you've a mind to.........
        Tom






        ---------------------------------
        Cheap Talk? Check out Yahoo! Messenger's low PC-to-Phone call rates.

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • robin edwards
        Tom, I am right with you, but I would rather buy your creative goods and learn from them to try an do some of my own things than try to do my own thing
        Message 3 of 18 , Dec 5, 2006
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          Tom,

          I am right with you, but I would rather buy your creative goods and learn from them to try an do some of my own things than try to do my own thing outright. I do have plenty of good ideas, but lack the creative and artistic ability to carry them off without a lot of hard work and trial and error. I would argue that narrow gaugers in the UK are still the cream of the crop as we don't have as much support as the standard gauge modellers. I guess we also have a lot more flexibility to improvise as well!

          Keep on creating!

          Robin (UK)

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: Tom Yorke
          To: Yorke_Kits@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Tuesday, December 05, 2006 8:27 PM
          Subject: [Yorke_Kits] Where have all the narrow gaugers gone.....................


          ..................................... long time
          passing............................................................................
          It used to be that the narrow gaugers were the cream of the crop. The most resourceful,
          most well read, best model builders and always the most creative and cutting edge. What
          happened when I blinked? They seem to be gone, save for a small handful of faithful still
          carrying the torch. Has it at last run its course? Most people don't have the patients to
          build anything. They want it done for them, but in many cases they don't want to pay for
          it. We have been innundated with (quality) items from China that no American company
          can compete with (even though I probably make an equal 25 cents an hour!).

          I remember years ago trolley modellers would spend money on their cars, but use "cerial"
          boxes with holes cut in them for structures! Beautiful trollies, but dreadful structures and
          dime store "scaleless" autos of wierd design and worse manufacture. Then it all changed.
          Things improved. Some really nice layouts started popping up. Now, in contemporary
          times, it seems we have reverted to those glorious years of the past. Wa' hapenn? Did
          everyone just lose interest?

          In days of old, we all knew where to get those pesky little detail parts because we all
          invested in manufacturer's catalogs like Precision, Kemtron, Grandt Line and so on. Now
          every day someone asks where to get something when its right there in the catalog. A
          couple bucks investment and you have the info at your finger tips. Most are even on the
          web now. Another question I love is "does anybody have any information on the WP&Y?
          Ever heard of Google and the internet? Why waste time waiting for 35 different people to
          answer the same thing over several days time when its right there in your computer?
          Questions are fine. That's how we learn, but common now, do a little work yourself. You
          might actually find it fun. Naaa! Guess not. Another thing. Buy some ties. Buy some spikes.
          They don't cost that much. Spend your time building a car from scratch. Why reinvent the
          wheel? I suppose it is possible to make your own glue too if you've a mind to. Me? I'd
          rather spend my limited time being more creative. I can buy glue anywhere.

          If we didn't have a part way back in the Stone Age, we'd make our own. It was much
          quicker than ordering from a catalog. If I'm building something, the last thing I want to do
          is to wait two weeks for a widget that I can make in ten minutes and be done with it. Now,
          if I had that widget from some company, I'd use it - but I'm not going to wait for it unless I
          can't make it.

          All of this really conserns me. I see the hobby really changing and in many ways, not for
          the good. I think the average age for a model railroader in somewhere in the mid 60's
          now. No matter what anybody says in any editorial in any model magazine, model
          railroading IS dying. Creativity from the hand is a thing of the past and that is too bad. The
          current world situation isn't helping any of this much. Some of us like what's going on and
          others don't. Just for the record, I am a don't, but that's enough politics here. It effects our
          minds and attitudes many times in a negative way. I try to use my modelling as an escape
          from reality. I can get lost in a project for hours. I love doing things by hand. And no, I
          wasn't born like that. I had to learn how to do all this stuff. You should see my earliest
          work. No you shouldn't come to think of it!

          Come on people. Let's get going. There isn't much you can do about the world situation,
          but you sure can get lost in your trains. That way you won't even know when the world
          blows up. You'll just be having fun, then..........poof

          Something to think about if you've a mind to.........
          Tom





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Ted Prichard
          Right on, Tom! It is a sad footnote to our times that this wonderful hobby seems to have a finite life remaining. At age 64, I m in about the youngest 25% of
          Message 4 of 18 , Dec 5, 2006
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            Right on, Tom!

            It is a sad footnote to our times that this wonderful hobby seems to
            have a finite life remaining. At age 64, I'm in about the "youngest
            25%" of members in the local train club, certainly the youngest
            third. For whatever the reason, folks still seem to think that
            railroads are a dying breed, too. Aware of my hobby, a woman friend
            said precisely that to me last week, unaware (until I told her) that
            the prototypes are carrying record volumes of freight. (Long-haul
            passenger service is a totally different story, but light rail
            is "rocking" in many areas.)

            However, I suspect that a similar situation exists with model planes
            and ships, too. No proof of this, just that it used to be that ponds
            and lakes would have frequent R/C sailors of some sort; the drone of
            model planes was a common Sunday event. Let's face it, the computer
            has given access to extraordinary sources of (other) hobby-oriented
            subjects, offering instant gratification instead of toiling at a
            workbench for hours with nothing to show for it. For some of us, the
            voyage is worth as much or more than the destination, while others
            lack that patience.

            Off the soapbox now, that's my humble opinion.

            Ted
          • Matthew Malkiewicz
            Tom, Very well spoken. I agree with you, whole-heartedly. I am hoping the Thomas the Train generation will bring youth back into the hobby. If just half
            Message 5 of 18 , Dec 5, 2006
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              Tom,



              Very well spoken. I agree with you, whole-heartedly.



              I am hoping the "Thomas the Train" generation will bring youth back into the hobby.

              If just half those kids stick with our hobby, it will be in very good hands.



              I wish I had a nickel for every Thomas engine sold.



              Matthew, age 41, in New Jersey.







              ----- Original Message -----
              From: Tom Yorke
              To: Yorke_Kits@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Tuesday, December 05, 2006 3:27 PM
              Subject: [Yorke_Kits] Where have all the narrow gaugers gone.....................


              ..................................... long time
              passing............................................................................
              It used to be that the narrow gaugers were the cream of the crop. The most resourceful,
              most well read, best model builders and always the most creative and cutting edge. What
              happened when I blinked? They seem to be gone, save for a small handful of faithful still
              carrying the torch. Has it at last run its course? Most people don't have the patients to
              build anything. They want it done for them, but in many cases they don't want to pay for
              it. We have been innundated with (quality) items from China that no American company
              can compete with (even though I probably make an equal 25 cents an hour!).

              I remember years ago trolley modellers would spend money on their cars, but use "cerial"
              boxes with holes cut in them for structures! Beautiful trollies, but dreadful structures and
              dime store "scaleless" autos of wierd design and worse manufacture. Then it all changed.
              Things improved. Some really nice layouts started popping up. Now, in contemporary
              times, it seems we have reverted to those glorious years of the past. Wa' hapenn? Did
              everyone just lose interest?

              In days of old, we all knew where to get those pesky little detail parts because we all
              invested in manufacturer's catalogs like Precision, Kemtron, Grandt Line and so on. Now
              every day someone asks where to get something when its right there in the catalog. A
              couple bucks investment and you have the info at your finger tips. Most are even on the
              web now. Another question I love is "does anybody have any information on the WP&Y?
              Ever heard of Google and the internet? Why waste time waiting for 35 different people to
              answer the same thing over several days time when its right there in your computer?
              Questions are fine. That's how we learn, but common now, do a little work yourself. You
              might actually find it fun. Naaa! Guess not. Another thing. Buy some ties. Buy some spikes.
              They don't cost that much. Spend your time building a car from scratch. Why reinvent the
              wheel? I suppose it is possible to make your own glue too if you've a mind to. Me? I'd
              rather spend my limited time being more creative. I can buy glue anywhere.

              If we didn't have a part way back in the Stone Age, we'd make our own. It was much
              quicker than ordering from a catalog. If I'm building something, the last thing I want to do
              is to wait two weeks for a widget that I can make in ten minutes and be done with it. Now,
              if I had that widget from some company, I'd use it - but I'm not going to wait for it unless I
              can't make it.

              All of this really conserns me. I see the hobby really changing and in many ways, not for
              the good. I think the average age for a model railroader in somewhere in the mid 60's
              now. No matter what anybody says in any editorial in any model magazine, model
              railroading IS dying. Creativity from the hand is a thing of the past and that is too bad. The
              current world situation isn't helping any of this much. Some of us like what's going on and
              others don't. Just for the record, I am a don't, but that's enough politics here. It effects our
              minds and attitudes many times in a negative way. I try to use my modelling as an escape
              from reality. I can get lost in a project for hours. I love doing things by hand. And no, I
              wasn't born like that. I had to learn how to do all this stuff. You should see my earliest
              work. No you shouldn't come to think of it!

              Come on people. Let's get going. There isn't much you can do about the world situation,
              but you sure can get lost in your trains. That way you won't even know when the world
              blows up. You'll just be having fun, then..........poof

              Something to think about if you've a mind to.........
              Tom





              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Matthew Malkiewicz
              Where are the model craftsmen? Sleeping out for the new Playstation PS3. ... From: Ted Prichard To: Yorke_Kits@yahoogroups.com Sent: Tuesday, December 05, 2006
              Message 6 of 18 , Dec 5, 2006
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                Where are the model craftsmen?
                Sleeping out for the new Playstation PS3.


                ----- Original Message -----
                From: Ted Prichard
                To: Yorke_Kits@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Tuesday, December 05, 2006 5:29 PM
                Subject: [Yorke_Kits] Where have all the model craftsmen gone?


                Right on, Tom!

                It is a sad footnote to our times that this wonderful hobby seems to
                have a finite life remaining. At age 64, I'm in about the "youngest
                25%" of members in the local train club, certainly the youngest
                third. For whatever the reason, folks still seem to think that
                railroads are a dying breed, too. Aware of my hobby, a woman friend
                said precisely that to me last week, unaware (until I told her) that
                the prototypes are carrying record volumes of freight. (Long-haul
                passenger service is a totally different story, but light rail
                is "rocking" in many areas.)

                However, I suspect that a similar situation exists with model planes
                and ships, too. No proof of this, just that it used to be that ponds
                and lakes would have frequent R/C sailors of some sort; the drone of
                model planes was a common Sunday event. Let's face it, the computer
                has given access to extraordinary sources of (other) hobby-oriented
                subjects, offering instant gratification instead of toiling at a
                workbench for hours with nothing to show for it. For some of us, the
                voyage is worth as much or more than the destination, while others
                lack that patience.

                Off the soapbox now, that's my humble opinion.

                Ted





                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • michael lynch
                ... DWAIN..Choose the northern border, we are friendly, like girls in bikinis or thongs, always carry Tim Hortons donuts with us wherever we go and good old
                Message 7 of 18 , Dec 5, 2006
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                  --- In Yorke_Kits@yahoogroups.com, dwain wright <fong4lai@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > VERY WELL SAID, TOM.
                  > often wonder whats next-being a greeter at the border or wallmart.
                  > dwain wright-
                  >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

                  DWAIN..Choose the northern border, we are friendly, like girls in
                  bikinis or thongs, always carry Tim Hortons donuts with us wherever we
                  go and good old canuck beer 5% alcohol.....madmike3434
                • Ray Keck
                  Tom- I must agree on many levels (including the fact that I m a don t ). I felt a twinge of guilt as I read your post. I m an architect with years of modeling
                  Message 8 of 18 , Dec 5, 2006
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                    Tom-

                    I must agree on many levels (including the fact that I'm a 'don't").
                    I felt a twinge of guilt as I read your post. I'm an architect with
                    years of modeling experience in many forms, and I rarely scratch-
                    build. Hell, I hardly ever build anything. With the job, the kids,
                    the nagging S.O. and her "honey do" list, I'm lucky if I get to
                    spend two hours a MONTH at the work bench.

                    I have an enormous collection of kits, rolling stock, details, etc.,
                    etc. I horde to keep up with the latest offerings. I keep telling
                    myself that someday I'll build it all. In the meantime my kids are
                    growing up, and they're not getting to be a part of Dad's hobby. The
                    little guy loves Thomas, and I have high hopes for him, but time
                    always seems to run out.

                    I yearn for my single days when I could spend the weekend building a
                    coaling tower, or detailing the sports car. By the time I have the
                    time (and the space) again, I'll be too old.

                    Now don't get me wrong: I scoff at the hordes of "hobbyists" who
                    pay through the nose for anything built-up on Ebay. And you're right
                    about the guys who don't read the magazines, hunt for resources, or
                    do any legwork. Heck, that's half the fun.


                    BTW, I'm 49, maybe a bit younger than your assumed demographic (and
                    only ten years younger than you). But I recall with fondness the
                    Mantua and Walthers kits of my youth, and have no intention of
                    skipping the fun of building.

                    Now if I could just get my wife to buy a house with a basement....

                    Ray Keck



                    -- In Yorke_Kits@yahoogroups.com, "Tom Yorke" <tomyorke@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > ..................................... long time
                    > passing
                    >
                    > Come on people. Let's get going. There isn't much you can do about
                    the world situation,
                    > but you sure can get lost in your trains. That way you won't even
                    know when the world
                    > blows up. You'll just be having fun, then..........poof
                    >
                    >
                    > Something to think about if you've a mind to.........
                    > Tom
                    >
                  • Matthew Malkiewicz
                    Ray, I agree. And in Large Scale, for example, Accucraft is producing museum quality narrow gauge rolling stock for not a lot more than offerings from
                    Message 9 of 18 , Dec 5, 2006
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                      Ray, I agree.



                      And in Large Scale, for example, Accucraft is producing museum quality narrow gauge rolling stock for not a lot more than offerings from Bachmann, USA Trains, and Aristo. On Accucraft's web page they are now announcing ON30 equipment.



                      I am sure there is plenty of "why build a kit when I can buy an Accucraft" out there.



                      The urge is growing within to pursue ON30 more aggressively; I am still heavily into 1:20.3 scale. I have Tom's Large Scale Box Cab on reserve, and you can bet I will throw plenty of fun filled hours at it constructing and super detailing it.



                      Matthew








                      Ray Keck wrote:

                      Now don't get me wrong: I scoff at the hordes of "hobbyists" who pay through the nose for anything built-up on Ebay.



                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • azflyer2001@cox.net
                      Ray, You said exactly what I was thinking. As an electrical designer, work is work and it never seems to slow down. At least your a few years closer to
                      Message 10 of 18 , Dec 5, 2006
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                        Ray,

                        You said exactly what I was thinking. As an electrical designer, work is work and it never seems to slow down. At least your a few years closer to retirement.

                        Travis in Mesa
                        35 years old and over worked.


                        ---- Ray Keck <raykeck@...> wrote:
                        > Tom-
                        >
                        > I must agree on many levels (including the fact that I'm a 'don't").
                        > I felt a twinge of guilt as I read your post. I'm an architect with
                        > years of modeling experience in many forms, and I rarely scratch-
                        > build. Hell, I hardly ever build anything. With the job, the kids,
                        > the nagging S.O. and her "honey do" list, I'm lucky if I get to
                        > spend two hours a MONTH at the work bench.
                        >
                        > I have an enormous collection of kits, rolling stock, details, etc.,
                        > etc. I horde to keep up with the latest offerings. I keep telling
                        > myself that someday I'll build it all. In the meantime my kids are
                        > growing up, and they're not getting to be a part of Dad's hobby. The
                        > little guy loves Thomas, and I have high hopes for him, but time
                        > always seems to run out.
                        >
                        > I yearn for my single days when I could spend the weekend building a
                        > coaling tower, or detailing the sports car. By the time I have the
                        > time (and the space) again, I'll be too old.
                        >
                        > Now don't get me wrong: I scoff at the hordes of "hobbyists" who
                        > pay through the nose for anything built-up on Ebay. And you're right
                        > about the guys who don't read the magazines, hunt for resources, or
                        > do any legwork. Heck, that's half the fun.
                        >
                        >
                        > BTW, I'm 49, maybe a bit younger than your assumed demographic (and
                        > only ten years younger than you). But I recall with fondness the
                        > Mantua and Walthers kits of my youth, and have no intention of
                        > skipping the fun of building.
                        >
                        > Now if I could just get my wife to buy a house with a basement....
                        >
                        > Ray Keck
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > -- In Yorke_Kits@yahoogroups.com, "Tom Yorke" <tomyorke@...> wrote:
                        > >
                        > > ..................................... long time
                        > > passing
                        > >
                        > > Come on people. Let's get going. There isn't much you can do about
                        > the world situation,
                        > > but you sure can get lost in your trains. That way you won't even
                        > know when the world
                        > > blows up. You'll just be having fun, then..........poof
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > Something to think about if you've a mind to.........
                        > > Tom
                        > >
                        >
                        >
                      • Ray Keck
                        You guys make me feel less fustrated, since I m not alone. There must be hundreds of us who are collecting kits we KNOW won t be avaiable in the future, so we
                        Message 11 of 18 , Dec 5, 2006
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                          You guys make me feel less fustrated, since I'm not alone. There must
                          be hundreds of us who are collecting kits we KNOW won't be avaiable
                          in the future, so we stash them for the day we can build.

                          I work on small projects that I can store away... a boat, rolling
                          stock, modified locos. But until I can have a space where they can
                          live free outside of a box or display case, my structure kits live in
                          the confines of my storage unit. Sad, but true.

                          As for 1:20 trains I, too, cannot resist, and don't. I have purchased
                          every circus trin I could find in G for my son, and still haven't set
                          up the shelf layout I've promised. Here's my New Year's resolution to
                          build it. The boys need to be shown the magic and tradition of
                          trains. Maybe the daughter, too.

                          We all have an obligation to pass this most American craft along to
                          our offspring. Not to negate our friends from other countries. Just
                          that, to me, a layout doesn't just emulate trains. It emulates a time
                          and place, most often a time and place no longer existing in this
                          country.

                          I have a BLI holiday loco with a string of Bachmann Christmas cars
                          running on a 4-foot square around our tree. The kids take turn
                          running it and hitting the whistle and bell (and the special holiday
                          sounds BLI added). They'll take that over a video game for the
                          duration of the holidays, at least.

                          I take my kids to the Cal State Rail Museum several times a year, and
                          on excursions.

                          I'll do my best to carry this hobby forward. I'm not half as talented
                          as you old farts, but I'll do what I can.

                          Tom, I promise to build one of your kits and show you the (meager)
                          results before we're both gone.


                          Ray




                          --- In Yorke_Kits@yahoogroups.com, <azflyer2001@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > Ray,
                          >
                          > You said exactly what I was thinking. As an electrical designer,
                          work is work and it never seems to slow down. At least your a few
                          years closer to retirement.
                          >
                          > Travis in Mesa
                          > 35 years old and over worked.
                          >
                          >
                          > ---- Ray Keck <raykeck@...> wrote:
                          > > Tom-
                          > >
                          > > I must agree on many levels (including the fact that I'm
                          a 'don't").
                          > > I felt a twinge of guilt as I read your post. I'm an architect
                          with
                          > > years of modeling experience in many forms, and I rarely scratch-
                          > > build. Hell, I hardly ever build anything. With the job, the
                          kids,
                          > > the nagging S.O. and her "honey do" list, I'm lucky if I get to
                          > > spend two hours a MONTH at the work bench.
                          > >
                          > > I have an enormous collection of kits, rolling stock, details,
                          etc.,
                          > > etc. I horde to keep up with the latest offerings. I keep telling
                          > > myself that someday I'll build it all. In the meantime my kids
                          are
                          > > growing up, and they're not getting to be a part of Dad's hobby.
                          The
                          > > little guy loves Thomas, and I have high hopes for him, but time
                          > > always seems to run out.
                          > >
                          > > I yearn for my single days when I could spend the weekend
                          building a
                          > > coaling tower, or detailing the sports car. By the time I have
                          the
                          > > time (and the space) again, I'll be too old.
                          > >
                          > > Now don't get me wrong: I scoff at the hordes of "hobbyists" who
                          > > pay through the nose for anything built-up on Ebay. And you're
                          right
                          > > about the guys who don't read the magazines, hunt for resources,
                          or
                          > > do any legwork. Heck, that's half the fun.
                          > >
                          > >
                          > > BTW, I'm 49, maybe a bit younger than your assumed demographic
                          (and
                          > > only ten years younger than you). But I recall with fondness the
                          > > Mantua and Walthers kits of my youth, and have no intention of
                          > > skipping the fun of building.
                          > >
                          > > Now if I could just get my wife to buy a house with a basement....
                          > >
                          > > Ray Keck
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > > -- In Yorke_Kits@yahoogroups.com, "Tom Yorke" <tomyorke@> wrote:
                          > > >
                          > > > ..................................... long time
                          > > > passing
                          > > >
                          > > > Come on people. Let's get going. There isn't much you can do
                          about
                          > > the world situation,
                          > > > but you sure can get lost in your trains. That way you won't
                          even
                          > > know when the world
                          > > > blows up. You'll just be having fun, then..........poof
                          > > >
                          > > >
                          > > > Something to think about if you've a mind to.........
                          > > > Tom
                          > > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          >
                        • Les
                          I agree with all that has been said here. I m 38, and haven t touched a model in about two years, not for lack of interest, just trying to refurbish a 100 year
                          Message 12 of 18 , Dec 6, 2006
                          • 0 Attachment
                            I agree with all that has been said here. I'm 38, and haven't touched a
                            model in about two years, not for lack of interest, just trying to refurbish
                            a 100 year old house and live in it at the same time, and keep my business
                            somewhere near the black.

                            I've four R/C model boats to finish, a layout to build, one to wire for a
                            friend, and lots of kits not even started (and more on the way, thanks to
                            Tom (please, please, dont tell the wife!)). Prebuilt is great, and gets
                            things running really fast, but nothing beats building it yourself.

                            When I do occasionally get to the local model railway club, I'm the youngest
                            there by about 35 years, and much as I enjoy teking the p*** out of the
                            older members, having a cuppa, discussing WW2, etc, I dont get there more
                            than two or three times a year.

                            What I really wonder is how life got so frantic that I can't get into my
                            workshop to sit down, let alone do anything...

                            Rant over!

                            Lost Other Les, whos also a don't, for what its worth.

                            ----- Original Message -----
                            From: <azflyer2001@...>
                            To: <Yorke_Kits@yahoogroups.com>
                            Cc: "Ray Keck" <raykeck@...>
                            Sent: Wednesday, December 06, 2006 2:14 AM
                            Subject: Re: [Yorke_Kits] Re: Where have all the narrow gaugers
                            gone.....................


                            > Ray,
                            >
                            > You said exactly what I was thinking. As an electrical designer, work is
                            > work and it never seems to slow down. At least your a few years closer to
                            > retirement.
                            >
                            > Travis in Mesa
                            > 35 years old and over worked.
                            >
                            >
                            > ---- Ray Keck <raykeck@...> wrote:
                            >> Tom-
                            >>
                            >> I must agree on many levels (including the fact that I'm a 'don't").
                            >> I felt a twinge of guilt as I read your post. I'm an architect with
                            >> years of modeling experience in many forms, and I rarely scratch-
                            >> build. Hell, I hardly ever build anything. With the job, the kids,
                            >> the nagging S.O. and her "honey do" list, I'm lucky if I get to
                            >> spend two hours a MONTH at the work bench.
                            >>
                            >> I have an enormous collection of kits, rolling stock, details, etc.,
                            >> etc. I horde to keep up with the latest offerings. I keep telling
                            >> myself that someday I'll build it all. In the meantime my kids are
                            >> growing up, and they're not getting to be a part of Dad's hobby. The
                            >> little guy loves Thomas, and I have high hopes for him, but time
                            >> always seems to run out.
                            >>
                            >> I yearn for my single days when I could spend the weekend building a
                            >> coaling tower, or detailing the sports car. By the time I have the
                            >> time (and the space) again, I'll be too old.
                            >>
                            >> Now don't get me wrong: I scoff at the hordes of "hobbyists" who
                            >> pay through the nose for anything built-up on Ebay. And you're right
                            >> about the guys who don't read the magazines, hunt for resources, or
                            >> do any legwork. Heck, that's half the fun.
                            >>
                            >>
                            >> BTW, I'm 49, maybe a bit younger than your assumed demographic (and
                            >> only ten years younger than you). But I recall with fondness the
                            >> Mantua and Walthers kits of my youth, and have no intention of
                            >> skipping the fun of building.
                            >>
                            >> Now if I could just get my wife to buy a house with a basement....
                            >>
                            >> Ray Keck
                            >>
                            >>
                            >>
                            >> -- In Yorke_Kits@yahoogroups.com, "Tom Yorke" <tomyorke@...> wrote:
                            >> >
                            >> > ..................................... long time
                            >> > passing
                            >> >
                            >> > Come on people. Let's get going. There isn't much you can do about
                            >> the world situation,
                            >> > but you sure can get lost in your trains. That way you won't even
                            >> know when the world
                            >> > blows up. You'll just be having fun, then..........poof
                            >> >
                            >> >
                            >> > Something to think about if you've a mind to.........
                            >> > Tom
                            >> >
                            >>
                            >>
                            >
                            >
                            > Thomas A. Yorke Design Studio Web Site
                            >
                            > http://www.thomasayorke.com/
                            >
                            > Remember, additional Yorke_Kits photos and files can now be found at:
                            >
                            > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Yorke_pics
                            >
                            >
                            > Yahoo! Groups Links
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > --
                            > No virus found in this incoming message.
                            > Checked by AVG Free Edition.
                            > Version: 7.1.409 / Virus Database: 268.15.6/567 - Release Date: 04/12/2006
                            >
                            >
                          • Darryl Huffman
                            When I look back over the last 62 years, I can t remember a time when I wasn t building models. The types, quality, and style have changed according to my
                            Message 13 of 18 , Dec 6, 2006
                            • 0 Attachment
                              When I look back over the last 62 years, I can't remember a time when I
                              wasn't building models.

                              The types, quality, and style have changed according to my whims and
                              experiences, but I don't think I have ever had a day in which I wasn't
                              constantly thinking about my latest model.

                              My list of modeling projects just gets longer and longer. I have slowed
                              down and require more sleep than before. Plus this computer eats into my
                              time. But other than that I am just as driven as ever.

                              Personally, when I go to conventions and see the quality of work being done
                              I realize I am falling behind more and more rather than gaining on the
                              competition.

                              A few years ago I had never heard of Brian Nolan or Laurie Green or John
                              Hunter or Dave Revelia or Brian Block or Lowell Ross, just to name a few.
                              But they are all doing tremendous work.

                              Quality and the desire to do better disappearing? Not according to what I
                              see. But that is just me.

                              Having fun in Alaska.

                              Darryl Huffman
                              Anchorage, Alaska

                              Looking for a gift idea? I have several inexpensive DVDs that are easy to
                              mail.
                              www.darrylhuffman.50megs.com
                            • M JONES
                              Well Tom I m here. When I decided to go from N scale to On30 I made myself promise to build everything! So far so good, buildings, rolling stock, mountains,
                              Message 14 of 18 , Dec 6, 2006
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                                Well Tom I'm here.
                                When I decided to go from N scale to On30 I made myself promise to build everything!
                                So far so good, buildings, rolling stock, mountains, trees, ect.
                                I agree "you can get lost for hours" and often do - its my only way to stay sane.
                                Most people today never had to work for anything, everyone wants it now.
                                BTW Im 39, lived my whole life in Florida, love narrow gauge and well used but cared for logging equipment.
                                My stuff has appeared in FSRR, and more will.
                                I also agree the hobby is changing, hopefully not dying.
                                I try to expose all my daughters friends to my RR, and all of them really enjoy seeing it and running the trains.
                                -Marty Jones


                                ---------------------------------
                                Everyone is raving about the all-new Yahoo! Mail beta.

                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              • Lowell Ross
                                Darryl and group, Darryl; thanks for the complement. At the young age of 38, running my own architectural practice, and having three young kids at home (1, 3,
                                Message 15 of 18 , Dec 6, 2006
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                                  Darryl and group,
                                  Darryl; thanks for the complement. At the young age of 38, running
                                  my own architectural practice, and having three young kids at home
                                  (1, 3, and 7). I find time to model hard to come by, but I do make
                                  the time. When I do build a model I try to involve my kids. My
                                  three year old son is the most interested and has already built a
                                  nice (cardboard) building on his own – you should see him with a
                                  needle nose tweezers. Believe it or not my one year old son loves to
                                  sit on my lap as I build something at the workbench - really. My
                                  seven year old daughter is into running trains and has built several
                                  buildings. I do not force the hobby on them, but rather let them
                                  engage at their own pace or interest level.

                                  My hope is that they see the importance of using their mind and hands
                                  to create something rather than buy it. In an age of instant
                                  gratification taking the time to do something right is a lesson well
                                  worth teaching. To me model railroading is more than just trains.
                                  There are so many facets to this hobby that many if not all are great
                                  lessons for kids. History, art, construction, patients (rare these
                                  days), satisfaction with a job well done, the list goes on.

                                  I hope my kids continue with some form of the hobby, but for now I am
                                  happy to see the benefits and lessons they are learning in the
                                  process. For us it has become more than just a hobby, it's become a
                                  family building experience.

                                  Take care,
                                  Lowell Ross


                                  P.S. Turn off the TV or computer and go build something :-)



                                  > A few years ago I had never heard of Brian Nolan or Laurie Green or
                                  John
                                  > Hunter or Dave Revelia or Brian Block or Lowell Ross, just to name
                                  a few.
                                  > But they are all doing tremendous work.
                                  >
                                  > Quality and the desire to do better disappearing? Not according to
                                  what I
                                  > see. But that is just me.
                                  >
                                  > Having fun in Alaska.
                                  >
                                  > Darryl Huffman
                                  > Anchorage, Alaska
                                  >
                                • edbuckner@comcast.net
                                  I have just started in model trains, but I have been in the model airplane hobby for the last 42 of my 50 years. The model airplane hobby is going through
                                  Message 16 of 18 , Dec 6, 2006
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                                    I have just started in model trains, but I have been in the model airplane hobby for the last 42 of my 50 years. The model airplane hobby is going through similar changes. Most activity now is ARF (Almost Ready to Fly) airplanes. Most of the model airplane magazines do not have construction articles anymore, and are mostly reviews of ARFs.

                                    The heyday for model airplanes was in the 1930s and 1940s when they airplanes were new and wonderous things. But I don't think we should be suprised that 37 years after we have landed a man on the moon, airplanes are old news.

                                    One aspect of model airplanes that has seemed to have taken off, especially with young people, is doing what they call 3-D aerobatics with radio controlled airplanes and helicopters. This is done with models that have unbelievable power to weight ratios that allow them to do things that full scales aircraft can not do. They look at it more as a sport than flying aircraft and I think it's an extension of video games.

                                    I hear the same lament from the old guys in that hobby too, but I guess we should just enjoy the hobby the best we can, and let the future take care of itself.

                                    Ed Buckner

                                    -------------- Original message --------------
                                    From: "Matthew Malkiewicz" <mfmalk@...>
                                    Where are the model craftsmen?
                                    Sleeping out for the new Playstation PS3.

                                    ----- Original Message -----
                                    From: Ted Prichard
                                    To: Yorke_Kits@yahoogroups.com
                                    Sent: Tuesday, December 05, 2006 5:29 PM
                                    Subject: [Yorke_Kits] Where have all the model craftsmen gone?

                                    Right on, Tom!

                                    It is a sad footnote to our times that this wonderful hobby seems to
                                    have a finite life remaining. At age 64, I'm in about the "youngest
                                    25%" of members in the local train club, certainly the youngest
                                    third. For whatever the reason, folks still seem to think that
                                    railroads are a dying breed, too. Aware of my hobby, a woman friend
                                    said precisely that to me last week, unaware (until I told her) that
                                    the prototypes are carrying record volumes of freight. (Long-haul
                                    passenger service is a totally different story, but light rail
                                    is "rocking" in many areas.)

                                    However, I suspect that a similar situation exists with model planes
                                    and ships, too. No proof of this, just that it used to be that ponds
                                    and lakes would have frequent R/C sailors of some sort; the drone of
                                    model planes was a common Sunday event. Let's face it, the computer
                                    has given access to extraordinary sources of (other) hobby-oriented
                                    subjects, offering instant gratification instead of toiling at a
                                    workbench for hours with nothing to show for it. For some of us, the
                                    voyage is worth as much or more than the destination, while others
                                    lack that patience.

                                    Off the soapbox now, that's my humble opinion.

                                    Ted

                                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




                                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                  • UncaDuck50@aol.com
                                    I take my kids to the Cal State Rail Museum several times a year, and on excursions. I ll do my best to carry this hobby forward. I m not half as talented as
                                    Message 17 of 18 , Dec 6, 2006
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                                      I take my kids to the Cal State Rail Museum several times a year, and
                                      on excursions.

                                      I'll do my best to carry this hobby forward. I'm not half as talented
                                      as you old farts, but I'll do what I can.

                                      Tom, I promise to build one of your kits and show you the (meager)
                                      results before we're both gone.

                                      Ray
                                      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

                                      Ray-
                                      Whereabouts do you live? The RR museum in Portola will allow you to
                                      rent a diesel locomotive in 12"=1 foot scale and operate it - your kids can
                                      take turns at the controls as well - just think how a video of that would go
                                      over at "show & tell" time!
                                      The museum is now on winter hours, but after the spring thaw...... You
                                      have to arrange this all in advance, and the cost is about $125/hour, which
                                      includes a qualified engineer to instruct and supervise.

                                      There are a lot of other neat railroad attractions in Northern Calif-
                                      contact me
                                      off-group if you like, and I'll be happy to pass info along.

                                      Best to you,
                                      Doug Rowe, up near the rebuilding Virginia & Truckee RR -link follows-
                                      _http://www.steamtrain.org/_ (http://www.steamtrain.org/)


                                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                    • Shawn
                                      I m 32 years old; that might make me the youngest person on this list. I built a layout when I was in highschool but gave up on modeling by the time I was 20.
                                      Message 18 of 18 , Dec 6, 2006
                                      • 0 Attachment
                                        I'm 32 years old; that might make me the youngest person on this list.
                                        I built a layout when I was in highschool but gave up on modeling by
                                        the time I was 20. I just got back into the hobby. I've put together
                                        a little workshop and have been experimenting with staining, painting,
                                        and weathering various materials. I've purchased, via ebay and the
                                        local hobby shop, several decades worth of back issues of MR, RMC and
                                        my favorite, NG&SLG. I had heard of the Gazette but had never seen
                                        one until a few months ago. It was like I was living a lie, thinking
                                        I knew about the hobby, then realizing the truth when I saw that first
                                        issue. The craftsmanship featured in the Gazette and FSRR is just so
                                        awesome! (The stuff the publish in MR doesn't even begin to compare
                                        to the Gazette). Anyway, I've learned alot and am attempting to apply
                                        my newfound knowledge. One way or another the hobby, including
                                        scratchbuilding just for the hell of it, will survive. I dream of
                                        one day building something something worthy of a Gazette article.

                                        Tom, your work is an inspiration.
                                        I few years ago I went back to school to finally earn my degree.
                                        Recently got done with it all and my career prospects are really
                                        looking up. As soon as I get that first big paycheck from my new job,
                                        I'm going to order a couple of your kits. Can't wait. Hopefully I'll
                                        know what I'm doing by the time they show up in the mailbox!

                                        There is one upside to the changes in the hobby... guys my age will
                                        never be able to speculate in brass models because we know in 20 years
                                        there won't be a market for them. Ha!

                                        Back to the workbench,
                                        --Shawn
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